ABookLegacy    

 Hard to Find and Rare Books

 Americana, Local History, Genealogy, Religion, Military

 Author Signed, First Editions, and others! 

Quick Search

Title
Author
Description
Keyword
Book Number
Advanced Search
 
 
Our secure web pages are hosted by Chrislands Inc, who use a Thawte SSL Certificate to ensure secure transmission of your information.
Fully Trusted SSL Certificate
 
A Book Legacy

Promote Your Page Too
Sign Up Today for Newsletter and Discounts!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse
 
Browse By Category
African American
Alabama
Alaska
Americana
Archaeology
Arizona
Arkansas
Art
Astronomy
Autobiography
Biography
Books On Books
Business- See Scholarly
California
Canada
Children
Colorado
Comics
Connecticut
Cookbook

View Other Categories
 
 
 

Search

Click on Book Title to view full description

 
Leila Ada, The Jewish Convert: An Authentic Memoir, Heighway, Osborn W. Trenery
21 Heighway, Osborn W. Trenery Leila Ada, The Jewish Convert: An Authentic Memoir
Philadelphia PA Presbyterian Board of Publication 1853 Revised Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
This is the original 1853 edition of this book. Brown decorative cover with gold relief. Cover shows some fading, title page yellowing and foxing around engraving otherwise pages clean and crisp. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. The story of a Jewish maiden to Christianity, her treatment by the family, and her Uncle's treatment of her to try and force her back into Judism. Scarce. ; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 230 pages 
Price: 37.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, Ironside, H. A
22 Ironside, H. A Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet
Neptune City, NJ Loizeaux Bros 1968 Second Edition; Twentieth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust in excellent condition and covered in mylar cover.. Has fold out chart. Former owners name in front. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; Lectures on Daniel the Prophet; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 253 pages 
Price: 26.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised), Ironside, H.A.
23 Ironside, H.A. Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised)
Bible Truth Depot 1954 First Edition; Eighth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Fair dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight and now in mylar cover. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 126 pages 
Price: 17.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
24 Ironside, Henry A. Addresses on the Epistles of John and an Exposition on the Epistle of Jude
Loizeaux Brothers, Incorporated 1948 New Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has minor chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission. 
Price: 26.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Brazen Serpent, or Faith in Christ Illustrated, Jones, Joseph H. D. D. (1797-1868)
25 Jones, Joseph H. D. D. (1797-1868) The Brazen Serpent, or Faith in Christ Illustrated
Philadelphia PA Presbyterian Board of Publication 1864 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Reddish brown cover has raised pattern and lettering is in gold. This is an extremely rare publication made during the civil war. The first five chapters all have the title "The Brazen Serpent", Chapter 6 is Little Eleanor about a gifted child who died and then Chapter 7 is The Basket Boy. The book is written for children and is mostly about the serpent in the wilderness. There are contemporary stories mixed in to illustrate God's care for faithful.The cover is in fine condition, but pages starting to yellow.Very clean contents. Joseph Huntington Jones, D. D., the brother of Judge Joel Jones, was born in Coventry, Connecticut, on August 24th, 1797. He graduated at Harvard University, in 1817. For a time he was employed as Tutor in Bowdoin College, Maine. He completed his theological studies at the Princeton Theological Semi­nary; was licensed as a probationer, September 19th, 1822, by the Presbytery of Susquehanna, and was, by the same Presbytery, ordained as an evangelist, April 29th, 1824. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. From 1861 to 1868 he was Secretary of the Relief Fund for Disabled Ministers, in which capacity he did a noble work, for which he deserves the lasting gratitude of the Church. He died on December 22d of 1868. Rare.; Engraving; 24mo 5" - 6" tall; 108 pages 
Price: 127.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
26 MacPherson, Rev. John, M.A. Presbyterianism
Edinburgh T. & T. Clark ca 1930 1st Thus; Various Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Red cover with black print. Not ex-library. Clean contents. Scarce. Possibly no publication date in item.; 12mo; 154 pages 
Price: 20.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A History of Providence Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, September 10, 1838-JUly 10, 1977, No Author Listed
27 No Author Listed A History of Providence Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, September 10, 1838-JUly 10, 1977
Clinton, S.C. Printers Assocites, Inc. 1977 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good 
Red cover gold print. Biographies of pastors, history of the church, gravestones, and much local history associated with the town and the church. Rare. 
Price: 29.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Our Church 1889-1989 The First Presbyterian Church Dade City, FLorida, No Author Listed
28 No Author Listed Our Church 1889-1989 The First Presbyterian Church Dade City, FLorida
No Publisher Listed 1988 Various Hardcover Fine with no dust jacket 
Blue cover with gold print. History of the Presbyterian Church in Dade City, FL. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Rare. 
Price: 59.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Review of Paley's Moral Philosophy, No Author Listed
29 No Author Listed Review of Paley's Moral Philosophy
Southern Presbyterian Review ca1850 1st Edition Thus Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
This early imprint (circa 1850) is from Dr. William Paley, D.D. The Principles of Moral and Political Economy. No cover and pages browning due to age. It was found among other Civil War Era imprints. The notable signature is that of J. Banks Lyle who is thought to be Joseph Banks Lyle a Teacher from S.C. and Oklahoma who was a CAPTAIN 5 REGT SC INF, Confederate States Army, South Carolina, who was granted the Confederate Medal of Honor. Born: Dec. 6, 1829, near Winnsboro, S.C. Died: Aug. 16, 1913, buried at Caddo Cemetery, Oklahoma .J. Banks Lyle, graduated A.B. from South Carolina College in 1856, was a Confederate War Hero, and a Teacher at Limestone Springs Academy in Spartanburg County, S.C. In 1870 he moved West where he taught at Paris, Tx, and Caddo Indian Territory (Oklahoma). An account of Captain Lyles was given by General Bratton as follows: "The most conspicuous feat of valor and skill (personal) that came in my knowledge during the war of secession was achieved in my brigade by an officer on the 27th of October, 1864. In the severe and constant fighting of that army, my staff, as well as line suffered, and it was necessary to fill the places of the wounded with officers of the line. To meet such demands, Capt. J. Banks Lyle, of the 5th S.C. regiment was then and had been for some time rendering efficient service in the brigade staff. On the morning of the above date, the enemy were in heavy force on the north side of the James and assailed our works with more or less vigor at various points, extending their attacks to and beyond the Charles City Wood.In the afternoon his cavalry assaulted our works, on the Williamsburg road held by our cavalry and were driven off. Field's division of cavalry was promptly moved to the Williamsburg road in anticipation of the assault by infantry, which followed, pushing our cavalry further to the left, my brigade under its Senior, Col. Walker, occupying the line crossing the road and were in position to meet and repulse it. In their retreat quite a number of them took refuge in a wash or gully, which ran through a depression in the filed some 300 or 400 yards in front of our line, nearly half way to the enemy's line. Capt. Lyle saw that they were whipped and would surrender if called on to do so. He so reported and asked permission to advance the skirmish line and take them in. His request was refused , but convinced that they would escape, simply because they were not invited to surrender before night came to cover their retreat he determined to attempt their capture. He went to the skirmish line and tried to get them to volunteer, and failing in that (all were willing to go if ordered), he started alone, but had not advanced a great ways when two men (I am sorry I cannot give their names) called out "hold on captain, you shan't go by yourself" and moved out with him. They had gone but a short distance when he concluded not to subject his brave little force to the danger of the possible error of his judgment, but to use their aid without risk to them. He had observed an officer trying to arouse the collapsed spirit of his men in the gully, and halting his volunteers on the crest overlooking their position, and ordered them to fire on the officer and put a stop to the harangue, while he advanced alone over the open field in full view of Field's division on our side and the whole force of the enemy on the other side. He was recognized by the men of his own brigade, but hose of the other one, misapprehending his conduct, fired on him at long range so heavily that the dust form bullets falling around him almost concealed him from view. This continued until word could be passed along the line stopping it, and of course served to attract the attention of all to him as he approached the gully where the enemy were, and in full view of friend and foe accomplished the capture, and made them file out without arms and move on to our lines. There was great excitement and enthusiasm on our side. Men all along the division mounted the works and exclamations of admiration, and inquiring "who is he, etc." The enemy did not seem to understand it at first, and took no part until they saw the men filing into our works, when they opened a battery on the scene which contributed to the general excitement, but was especially effective in hurrying the movement of the prisoners into our works. The number of officers and men captured were about 600 with three stands of colors and swords by the armful."It was based on this deed that he won the Confederate Medal of Honor by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Captain Lyle moved to Caddo, O.K. from S.C. where he died on August 16, 1913, Captain Lyle had lived in Caddo the past sixteen years (since 1897), was 84 years of age at his death.Captain Lyle prior to the Civil War was a school teacher in South Carolina and at the outbreak raised a company of volunteers composed chiefly of his pupils. He served the entire four years in the Confederate Army and was recommended for promotion for conspicuous bravery and intelligent conduct. Imprint is in an archival sleeve for protection. ; Curiosa; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 32 pages; Signed by Notable Personage, Unrelated 
Price: 199.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
30 No Author Listed The Book of Church Order of the Presbyterian Church in the United States
Richmond, VA John Knox Press 1956 1st Thus; Twenty-Ninth Printing Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Blue cover with gold print on spine. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Clean contents. Fully indexed.; 24mo 5" - 6" tall 
Price: 49.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Young Envelope Makers, No Author Listed
31 No Author Listed The Young Envelope Makers
Richmond, VA Presbyterian Committee of Publications 1867 Later Printing; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Tan cover with seal of Prebyterian Committee, Richmond on front. Scarce. Some browning to pages otherwise clean. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition.; Engravings; 24mo 5" - 6" tall; 198 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
32 Overmyer, Joe B. , J. Blair Morton History of the Presbytery of Kanawha
Charleston, W. Va. Jarrett Printing Co. 1957 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Book Started by Dr. J. Blair Morton who was clerk of Kanawha Presbytery for 37 years and finished by 17 years after his death.; Phographs 
Price: 39.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
33 Reed, R. C. What is the Kingdom of God?
Richmond VA Presbyterian Committee of Publications 1922 paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Tan cover has chips. Back cover missing. Rare. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 16mo; 146 pages 
Price: 10.45 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
34 Reid, John Calvin Thanksgiving in the Face of Atomic Bombs
Pittsburg PA MT. Lebanon Presbyterian Church N.D. First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Booklet Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 16mo; 10 pages 
Price: 3.68 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A Pioneer Church Being a Reverently Realistic Account of the First Presbyterian Church of Boulder, Colorado in it's Total Pioneer Origin 1872-1972, Schoolland, John B.
35 Schoolland, John B. A Pioneer Church Being a Reverently Realistic Account of the First Presbyterian Church of Boulder, Colorado in it's Total Pioneer Origin 1872-1972
Boulder CO Johnson Publishing Company 1972 Various Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Blue cloth cover has tears at top of spine. Hing beginning to crack otherwise tight and clean. Fully illustrated. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Photographs & illustrations; 4to; 183 pages 
Price: 11.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Trenton Falls, Picturesque and Descriptive, Sherman, John, et al.
36 Sherman, John, et al. Trenton Falls, Picturesque and Descriptive
New York, NY N. Orr & Co. 1868 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by N. Orr 
Brown cloth cover with gold Inlay illustration. Rubs and dented corners. Excellent engravings and history. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Former owners name inscribed in pencil in front and dated 1874.Dr. Hall in his History of the Presbyterian Church in Trenton says that the Falls of the Delaware was not only the first, name given to that part of the river where Trenton was afterwards built, but was used for more than a century to denote the general locality. Mr. Raum, speaking in his History of Trenton, of the Dutch and Swedes who preceded the English in this country, referred to their fortifications on the Delaware, by them called the South River, near Gloucester in New Jersey, and also on the Hudson, or North River, in New York, 2 and remarked that the Yorkshire commissioners chose the purchase from the Assunpink, or Falls of the Delaware, to Rancocas Creek. THE growth of Trenton for some time after the settlement in 1679 appears to have been slow. It is stated in Woodward and Hageman’s History o f Burlington and Mercer Counties 168 that prior to 1700 no great progress was made in the settlement here; that about that time purchases began to be made from the original proprietors or those who had taken up the land; and that most of the old deeds for lands in this vicinity bear date from 1699 to 1710. ; Engravings, black and white photographs; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 96 pages 
Price: 39.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Biography of Rev. James Thomas Barbee, 1838-1920, Simpson, George Brown
37 Simpson, George Brown Biography of Rev. James Thomas Barbee, 1838-1920
Sturgis, KY M & M Print 1980 1st Thus; Various Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by Simpson, Nina June 
Yellow cover with black print. A rare account of the Presbyterian church in Tennessee and Kentucky. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. ; B&W Illustrations; 133 pages 
Price: 24.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Paul, A Typical Presbyterian, Smith, Egbert
38 Smith, Egbert Paul, A Typical Presbyterian
Richmond VA Presbyterian Committee of Publications 1930 1st Thus; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Rare imprint of Sermon by author from early 1900"s or late 1800"s. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book. 
Price: 11.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Cry of the World, Smith, Oswald J
39 Smith, Oswald J The Cry of the World
Edinburgh, Scotland Marshall, Morgan & Scott 1961 Revised Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket 
Book looks new. Dust has minor chips around edges, now in brodart mylar cover. Former owner name in front. Oswald Jeffrey Smith (November 8, 1889 – January 25, 1986) was a Canadian pastor, author, and missions advocate. He founded The Peoples Church in Toronto in 1928. Smith attended the Toronto Bible Training School, the Manitoba Presbyterian College in Winnipeg, and the McCormick Seminary in Chicago. Smith was ordained as a minister of the Presbyterian Church of Canada in 1918. Very clean text. ; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 128 pages 
Price: 11.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
God the Refuge of His People, from the message by Smith to the S.C. General Assembly, December 7, 1850, Smith, Whitefoord, Rev.
40 Smith, Whitefoord, Rev. God the Refuge of His People, from the message by Smith to the S.C. General Assembly, December 7, 1850
South Carolina House of Representives, South Carolina 1850 1st Edition Thus Manila Folder or Binder Good with No dust jacket as issued 
No cover, text complete, a few pages loose from stitching. This imprint is an original extract from the Message of his Excellency, W.B. Seabrook the Governor of South Carolina in the S.C. Senate Journal, 1850. Gov. Seabrook and other Southern States had been considering the affects of the Northern States actions against the South and the southern movement to "disunion". "One such slight by the U.S. Congress happened in 1841. He proposed that South Carolina receive her share of the proceeds from the sale of public lands as provided for by Act of Congress in 1841 and hitherto declined for constitutional reasons. The governor dwelt at considerable length on the differences between North and South, and the evidence for his conclusion that the South could no longer hope for security of life, or liberty, or property within the Union. He concluded: “The time, then, has come to resume the exercise of the powers of self protection, which in the hour of unsuspecting confidence, we surrendered to foreign hands...... While adhering faithfully to the remedy of joint State action for redress of common grievances, I beseech you to remember, that no conjuncture of events ought to induce us to abandon the right of deciding ultimately on our own destiny.” “ By legislative resolution, Friday, December 6, was designated as a day of fasting and humiliation, on which the clergy of South Carolina should call together their congregations to ask divine guidance for the General Assembly in devising measures conducive to the best interests and welfare of the state. On that day the Reverend Whitefoord Smith conducted religious services and delivered a sermon before the members of the Assembly. The sermon was largely a defense of the institution of slavery." (The Secession Movement in South Carolina, 1847-1852) "Born in Charleston in 1812, Smith he took his name from the family name of his father’s mother. His great-great grandfather, Sir Adam Whitefoord, had been a Scottish baronet, and his great-grandfather, Col. Charles Whitefoord, was an officer in the 5th Regiment of Foot. He attended the city schools in Charleston before moving on to South Carolina College. He was a student in Columbia during the presidency of Thomas Cooper. While at college, he found that he could not accept all of the teachings in the “Shorter Catechism” and left the Presbyterian Church of his ancestors for the Methodist Church. Methodism was, at the time, a denomination of the common people" (.wofford.edu/from_the_archives) This imprint is one of 2000 printed after the S.C. General Assembly meeting where Dr. Smith spoke. Rare. In archival sleeve for preservation. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 16 pages 
Price: 149.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
< PREV  1   2  3  NEXT >  


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to [email protected]
Copyright©2020. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie
db error Data too long for column 'request' at row 1