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1 Atcheson, Wayne Faith of the Crimson Tide Inspiring Alabama Sports Stories of Faith
Cross Training Publishing 2000 1929478224 / 9781929478224 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by author on end paper. Subtitle: Inspiring Alabama Sports Stories of Faith

This book features moving stories of faith from Alabama athletes, coaches and staff. These (sometimes humours) stories are taken from events with Crimson Tide athletics; from events during games, practices and in the locker room. They deal with a variety of spiritual issues like role models, adversity, illness, tragedy, hardship, decision-making, forgiveness, death, patience and love. Featuring stories from: Shaun Alexander, Coach Ronnie Cottrell, Coach Mike DuBose, Tommy Ford, Chad & Leah Goss, Coach Mark Gottfried, Coach Charlie Harbison, Coach Ellis Johnson, Kermit Koenig, Bill McDonald, Coach Rick Moody, Coach Betty Palmer, Coach David Patterson, Ryan Pflugner, Andy Phillips, John David Phillips, Coach Robert Scott, Coach Dick Spybey, Kevn Stephen, and Coach Jim Wells. ; 1.06 x 8.86 x 5.94 Inches; 288 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 18.97 USD

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Faith in the Fight, Binsfield, John W. &  William C. Davis
2 Binsfield, John W. & William C. Davis Faith in the Fight
Stackpole Books 2003 0811700178 / 9780811700177 First Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good in As New dust jacket 
Tan and black cover with gilt print. Some marginal notations from the former owner an Army Chaplain who may have used them for sermon notes. Condition otherwise like new. For both Union and Confederate soldiers, religion was the greatest sustainer of morale in the Civil War, and faith was a refuge in a great time of need. Guarding and guiding the spiritual well-being of the fighters, army chaplains were a voice of hope and reason in an otherwise chaotic military existence. Here for the first time, encompassing the depth and breadth of their dedication and sacrifice, is their fascinating and uplifting story. Dr. James I. Robertson, Jr., is an alumni distinguished professor of history and the executive director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech. William C. Davis is professor of history and director of programs of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies. John Brinsfield is a retired army chaplain in Atlanta, Georgia. Benjamin Maryniak is a lifelong student of the Civil War in Lancaster, New York. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover.; Photographs; 9.10 X 6.10 X 1 inches; 256 pages 
Price: 24.97 USD
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3 Cronin, John J Conferences on the spiritual and religious life
St Louis, MO Wellington 1941 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Green cover has spotting. Tight binding and clean contents. Signed by author. Scarce. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. ; 227 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 26.18 USD
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4 Custer, Jack (evangelist) Our Spiritual Warfare
Lebanon, TN Outreach Evangelism Publications ca 1950 First Edition; Various Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Tan cover with black print. Rare booklet on spiritual warfare. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo; 17 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Gospel and Spiritual song book of Nation Wide Hit Songs, Fowler, Wally
5 Fowler, Wally Gospel and Spiritual song book of Nation Wide Hit Songs
Nashville, Tenn Wally Fowler 1950 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Song book by Author and the Oak Ridge Quartet. Signed by author and members of the Oakridge Quartet. Johnny New, Pat Patterson, Bobby Lee Weber, Glen Allred, and Bobby Whitfield. Photos of members inside book. Soiling to cover. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Rare. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; Signed by Collection of Signatures 
Price: 29.97 USD
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6 Godbey, Rev. W. B. Satan's Side-Tracks for Holiness People
Nashville, Tenn Pentecostal Mission Pub. Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Tan cover with black print. Rare booklet has signature on front. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo; 48 pages 
Price: 29.97 USD
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The Two SOns, Godbey, Rev. W. B.
7 Godbey, Rev. W. B. The Two SOns
Cincinnati, OH God's Revivalist Press ca 1900 1st Thus; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Tan cover with black print. Rare. work on Luke 16th chapter. Booklet has former owners name on front. Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 32 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
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Keswickism, Godbey, W.B.
8 Godbey, W.B. Keswickism
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Booklet's cover is detached and has chips. Contents complete. Rare work by Godbey on Keswickism. Rare if not unique. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life.II. Wesley and WesleyanismA. Wesley & SanctificationIn the theology of John Wesley one finds a new direction, distinct both from Reformed and classic Arminianism Wesley built his understanding of the nature of man solidly upon the Reformed position of original sin, and the subsequent necessity of divine grace for salvation. Here however he parted company with the reformers and injected the doctrine of prevenient grace, (all men have received of the Holy Spirit the ability to respond to God) into his understanding of the doctrine of salvation. Wesley rejected the Reformed concept of election , opting instead for the Arminian concept of conditional election. Thus he joined the Reformed doctrine of the total sinfulness of the individual and the primacy of grace with the Arminian stress on human freedom, with its subsequent moral obligations. But his doctrine of Sanctification was not traditional Arminianism Wesley was also heavily influenced by the mystics. Packer has observed that he superimposed“on the Augustinianism of the Anglican prayer book and the heaven aspiring High Church moralist in which he was reared a concept of perfection . . . that he had learned from the Greek Patristic sources. “Macarius the Egyptian” . . . and Ephraem Syrus were chief among these. There idea of perfection was not of sinlessness, but of an ever deepening process of all around moral change. To this idea Wesley then added the lesson he had learned form those whom he called the “mystic writers” (a category including the Anglican William Law, the Roman Catholics Molinos, Fenelon, Gaston de Renty, Francis de Sales, and Madame Guyon, the Lutheran Pietist Francke, and the pre-reformation Theologia Gremanica) The lesson was that the heart of true godliness is a motivating spirit of love to God and man; without this all religion is hollow and empty. (Keep In Step with the Spirit,134)Wesley asserted the primacy of justification, and the assurance the believer could have based upon the righteousness of Christ. However, his Arminian view of election creeps into his view of final salvation. He views the process of Sanctification as one of making the individual worthy of salvation. This process is a work of God, but it is also a work of man. At this point a synergism appears. At one point he explicitly states that good works are a condition of final justification which he regards as necessary for final salvation (Lindstrom, 207)B. Developments within WesleyanismAs Wesleyanism took root in America, it was institutionalized in the context of the circuit rider and revivalism. This had profound results on the form of the teaching. As early as 1784 Francis Asbury advocated preaching the experience of entire sanctification as one which believers should expect immediately by faith. Revivalism emphasized definable turning points in a Christian’s life as essential. Holiness preaching tended to center around Wesley’s sanctification teaching of a second crisis experience subsequent to justification which was commonly termed entire sanctification. From this followed it followed that it was the duty of those who had experienced entire sanctification to confess it and seek to bring others into this experience.As Methodism became respectable, there was a call for a return to the pure doctrine of Wesley. In the latter part of the nineteenth century the National holiness Association was born to promote Wesleyan-holiness theology. Three names are prominent in the promulgation of holiness theology: Phobe Palmer; William Boardman; and Hannah Whitehall Smith.Phobe Palmer’s emphasis becomes key here. Although she says nothing that Wesley did not say a century before, she changes the Wesleyan emphasis subtly, and injects presuppositions foreign to Wesley. Whereas with Wesley the experience of perfection was something to be sought, for Palmer it was vital for continuance of salvation. For Palmer the crisis was vital. Perfection was the beginning of the Christian life and growth in holiness and the focal point of the Christian life. The focus of sanctification tended to be wholly upon a single point of wholehearted commitment, and divorced from any gradual process. “Thus, the moment of death to self and birth to love readily became an end in itself--a goal rather than an essential element in the establishment of a new relationship of freedom and love in the hearts of believers as the Holy Spirit led them from grace to grace in the will of God. (Dieter, 41)C. Key PropositionsSecond Work Of Grace.For the holiness proponents particularly the second work of grace became vital for retaining one’s salvation. Palmer particularly sees justification as dependent upon the believer’s faithfulness. she states:“As I ascended the heavenly way, clearer light shone upon my mind, revealing higher duties, requiring more of the spirit of sacrifice, and furnishing yet stronger tests of obedience. but with increasing light, increasing strength was given, enabling me to be answerable to these higher duties: for I had not learned how to retain justification while under condemnation at the same time for neglecting known duties.”For Palmer the solution lay in sanctification, envisioned as a post conversion crisis. She termed this a crisis because for her the issue was the retention or loss of justification. again she states:“I saw I could not; I must either make the necessary sacrifices, or I must sin, and by my sin forfeit my state of justification. And here my justification would have ended with me had I refused to be holy.”Thus, the second work of grace is really the basis of one’s continuance in salvation.The means of achieving this second work of grace is conceived of as an act of faith akin to the act of faith involved in justification. William Boardman notes:“Whether the question relates to justification or sanctification, the answer is the same. The way of freedom from sin is the same as the way of freedom from condemnation. . . faith in the purifying presence of Jesus.” (Higher Christian Life, 81)This same mentality persists to this day. in the Spring of 1986 I attended a Sanctification Conference sponsored by the C&MA in Piedmont CA. The keynote speaker, the president of the denomination began his first sermon with the words, “There are two gospels, the gospel of justification is for the sinner, the gospel of sanctification for the saint.” Justification is seen as delivering from the penalty of sin, sanctification is seen to deliver from the power of sin.For Boardman, this work of grace is a mystical inauguration into a process:“In the one, atonement has been made, and the moment it is accepted, pardon is complete; in the other, although the righteousness of Christ is perfect in which the soul is to be clothed, yet the work of unfolding . . . is a work of time and progress.” (40)Hannah Whitehall Smith propounds the basic teaching of holiness theology by bifurcating justification and sanctification. Her contribution, no doubt reflecting her Quaker background was the injection of a quietism into the process. She envisions the process as an entire surrender to the Lord, and a perfect trust in Him. She envisions three steps to the process:(1) The Christian must realize the gift of God.“In order therefore to enter into a practical experience of this interior life, the soul must be in a receptive attitude, fully recognizing that it is God’s gift in Christ Jesus.” (The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life, 47)(2) Consecration is necessary.She states that the soul must be abandoned to God and lie passive in His hands (47) “To some minds the word ‘abandonment might express this idea better than the word consecration. But whatever word we use, we mean an entire surrender of the whole being to God--spirit soul and body placed under his absolute control, for Him to do with us as He pleases.”(3) Faith then follows surrender.“Love may be lavished upon us by another without stint or measure, but until we believe we are that we are loved, it never really becomes ours.” (51) She concludes: “In order to enter into this blessed interior life of rest and triumph, you have to take two steps--first entire abandonment; and second absolute faith. (52-54)While, holiness theologies come in many varieties and with various emphases, they all make the crucial disjuncture between justification, appropriated by faith and securing pardon form sin and sanctification/crisis/second work of grace/baptism by the spirit as a post conversion faith experience which breaks the power of sin.Sinlessness:In Wesley’s mind sin was primarily voluntary and was thus intimately bound up with the will. In a sermon on 1 John 3:9 speaking of the privilege of sinlessness he defined sin in a wholly voluntary manner.By sin I here understand outward sin, according to the plain common acceptation [sic] of the word; an actual, voluntary, transgression of the law of God; and of any commandment of God, acknowledged to be such, at the time it is transgressed.Elsewhere speaking of the nature of sin he declared:Not only sin, properly so called, (that is, a voluntary transgression of a known law) but sin, improperly so called, (that is an involuntary transgression of a divine law, known or unknown) needs the atoning blood.I believe there is no such perfection in this life as excludes these involuntary transgressions which I apprehend to be naturally consequent on the ignorance and mistakes inseparable from mortality.Therefore sinless perfection is a phrase I never use, lest I should seem to contradict myself.I believe a person filled with the love of God is still liable to these involuntary transgressions.Such transgressions you may call sin, if you please: I do not, for the reasons above-mentioned. (Works: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 19 (XI, 396)Wesley’s hamartiology “emphasized the willful or spiritual dimensions of sin more than the outward (moral) or cognitive (theoretical knowledge) aspects of it. Sinlessness in this context was more a matter of willing God’s will than replicating God’s perfect knowledge, action, or holiness; sin was more a matter of knowledgeable and willful rebellion against God’s will than a failure or lack of conformity to the glory of God.” (John Tyson, Charles Wesley on Sanctification (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1986) 257.)Christian Perfection:John Wesley saw Christian perfection which was available to all believers in this life as a gift from God and to be accomplished in a moment in time Christian Perfection is that love of God and our neighbor, which implies deliverance from all sin. That this is received merely by faith That it is given instantaneously, in one moment. That we are to expect it, not at death, but at any moment; that is, now is the accepted time, now is the day of this salvationJohn Wesley was adamant about the instantaneous nature of this perfection/sanctification. His brother Charles however more and more brought the process to the forefront as the years progressed.Wesley himself drew up a list of ten propositions concerning perfection which teach a progress-crisis-progress as a model for Christian perfection. In these propositions it can clearly be seen that Wesley does not understand the term teleios in the sense of mature (BAG,187) but rather in the sense of his own definition of sinlessness. There is such a thing as perfection: for it is again and again mentioned in Scripture. It is not so early as justification: for justified persons are to “go on to maturity.” (Heb. 6:1) It is not so late as death; for St. Paul speaks of living men that were perfect (Phil. 3:15) It is not absolute. Absolute perfection belongs not to man, nor to angels, but to God alone. It does not make a man infallible: None is infallible, while he remains in the body. It is sinless? It is not worthwhile to contend for a term. It is ‘salvation from sin.’ It is ‘perfect love.’ (I John 4:18) This is the essence of it; its properties, or inseparable fruits, are, rejoicing evermore, praying without ceasing, and in everything giving thanks. (I Thess. 5:16, etc.) It is improvable. It is so far from lying in an indivisible point, from being incapable of increase, that one perfected in love may grow in grace far swifter than he did before. It is amissible, capable of being lost; of which we have numerous instances. But we were not thoroughly convinced of this, till five or six years ago. It is constantly both preceded and followed by a gradual work.” (WORKS: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 25 (XI, 441-42)).As can be seen from the above quoted propositions, for Wesley perfection was not the equivalent of maturity, but it was to be equated with sinlessness (i.e. voluntary transgression), or love. He explained perfection elsewhere as “perfect love.” “I want you to be all love. This is the perfection I believe and teach.” He was careful not to set perfection too high, recognizing the dangers of “high-strained perfection” which he said led to a thousand nervous disorders. Such high-strained perfection (“so high as no man we have ever heard or read of attained [it]”) would have the unexpected result of driving Christian perfection out of the world.Entire Sanctification:This is “a personal, definitive work of God’s sanctifying grace by which the war within oneself might cease and the heart be fully released from rebellion into wholehearted love for God and others.” (Dieter, 17) This experience has negative and positive benefits. Negatively, it is seen as a cleansing of the heart, which heals the remaining systemic damage from Adam’s transgression. Positively, it, it is a freedom, “a turning of the whole heart toward God in love to seek and to know His will, which becomes the soul’s delight.” (Dieter, 18) Wesley listed the benefits of this sanctification: To love God with all one’s heart and one’s neighbor as oneself; To have the mind that is in Christ; To bear the fruit of the Spirit (in accordance with Gal. 5); The restoration of the image of God in the soul, a recovery of man to the moral image of God, which consists of righteousness and true holiness”; 5.Inward and outward righteousness, “holiness of life issuing from the heart”; God’s sanctifying of the person in spirit, soul and body; The person’s own perfect consecration to God; A continuous presentation through Jesus of the individual’s thoughts, words and actions as a sacrifice to God of praise and thanksgiving; Salvation from all sin. (Wesley, sermon “On Perfection”, Works 6, 413-15.)D. Scriptural SupportWesleyans claim that they approach Scripture holistically and do not rely on proof-texts for their doctrine, and that the holistic teaching of Scripture, its warp and woof, supports their doctrine of Sanctification. Nevertheless there are several passages which form the matrix of their understanding of the nature of sanctification. These include:Deut. 30:6Ezekiel 35:-26, 29Matt. 5:8, 48; 6;10Rom 2:29Rom 12:1-2 Therefore I urge you brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship.Phoebe Palmer a leader in the revival of Wesleyanism in the late 19th century gives a typical holiness exposition of this passage, placing it in the context of the altar of Exodus 29:37. According to Palmer, Christ is the believers altar. Since according to Exodus everything that touched the altar is holy, every Christian who was willing by faith to present himself without reservation as a living sacrifice upon the altar of the finished work of Christ would be entirely sanctified and cleansed from all sin. (Dieter, 39)2 Cor 3:17-18; 7:1Gal 2:20Ephesians 3:14-29; 5:27Phil 3:151 Thess. 5:23Titus 2:11-14;Heb. 6:1; 7:25; 10:14John 8:34-36;John 17:20-23:Commenting on the John 17 passage, Mildred Wynkoop has noted parallels with Ephesians 4:Jesus had in mind a spiritually unified body of believersThat would bring glory to Himself.He died to sanctify them. Al other elements of redemption were included but incidental to this.Sanctification was in word and in truth. This “word” obviously not the Scripture primarily, but was found in living fellowship with the living Word, who is himself Truth.The commission was accompanied by a moral fitness--for the unity of the spirit indicated in both passages is moral clear through.(Wynkoop Theology of Love, 320, cited by Dieter, 32)1 John 1:51 John 7-91 John 2:61 John 3:31 John 3:8-10In commenting on this passage Wesley based his whole thesis upon his definition if sin as voluntary transgression. (see above), James 1:4E. CritiqueRedefinition Of Terminology:The Reformed have for centuries taken Wesley to task for teaching sinless perfection. While this charge is not really accurate, for the reasons shown above, Wesley himself must bear the blame for this charge because of his own redefinition of terms. Packer notes:It was indeed confusing for Wesley to give the name perfection to a state which from many standpoints was one of continued imperfection. It was yet more confusing that he should define sin “properly so called”, subjectively, as “voluntary transgression of a known law,” rather than objectively, as failure, whether conscious or unconscious, voluntary or involuntary, to conform to God’s revealed standards. It was supremely confusing when he let himself speak of sanctified persons as being without sin ( because they were not consciously breaking any known law) while at the same time affirming that they need the blood of Christ every moment to cover their actual shortcomings. Wesley himself insisted that by the objective standard of God’s “perfect law,” every sanctified sinner needs pardon every day; that makes it seem perverse of him also to have insisted on stating his view of the higher Christian life in terms of being perfect and not sinning.Unrealistic Theological Rationale:Wesley at least saw the experience of perfection uprooting and eradicating sinful desire from the heart. His understanding saw this not only as a change in the moral nature but as effecting some kind of a physical change as well. (see Packer 140-141) This thread of Wesley’s teaching has been picked up by such groups as the church of the Nazarene in its teaching of the eradication of the sin nature.Spiritual Elitism:The injection of a second work of grace into the Christian life also leads to a spiritual elitism on the part of those who have attained this “higher life.” There is a subtle tendency to look down patronizingly upon those who have not had this experience. (One of my former students at Simpson recently told me he was going to write an article entitled, “my life as a second class Christian”!)Dangers of Legalism:Particularly in the holiness groups, the Wesleyan concept of perfection as perfect love was exchanged for what Wesley called “high-strained” perfectionism which seeks the absolute perfection of God. To achieve this high standard, sin was redefined in terms of external acts and equated with cultural norms e.g. smoking, drinking, dancing, hair length, makeup, movies. Richard Lovelace speaks eloquently to this problem. . “. .. the conscience cannot accept sanctification unless it is based in a foundation in justification. When this is attempted the resulting insecurity creates a luxuriant overgrowth of religious flesh as believers seek to build a holiness formidable enough to pacify their consciences and quiet their sense of alienation from God. (The Dynamics of Spiritual Life, 104,) “The fully enlightened conscience cannot be pacified by any amount of grace inherent in our lives, since that always falls short of the perfection demanded by God’s law. . . such a conscience is forced to draw back into the relative darkness of self-deception. Either it manufactures a fictitious righteousness in heroic works of ascetic piety, or it redefines sin in shallow terms so that it can lose the consciousness of its presence.” (99)Problems With Exegesis:Wesley’s Scriptural proof of his doctrine (see above) consist of either promises and calls to holiness (with affirmations that God will indeed finally deliver his people from sin) or they are statements of accomplished deliverance which the believer possesses now. “Wesley affirms that the promises find fulfillment in total and absolute terms in this life and appeals to declarations, along with the prayers and commands, to buttress his conclusions.” (Packer, 139). In short he falls victim to a totally realized eschatology rather than seeing the tension of an “already but not yet” with reference to the Christian life.Protestations notwithstanding . . .Wesley in his own life did not rely upon justification for his acceptance before God. He looked to his state of Sanctification and there found that he was less than perfect. This caused him doubt of his salvation.On October 14, 1738 he wrote, “I cannot find in myself the love of God, or of Christ. Hence my deadness and wanderings in public prayer...Again: I find I have not that joy in the Holy Ghost.”On January 4, 1739 he wrote, “My friends affirm I am mad, because I said I was not a Christian a year ago. I affirm I am not a Christian now. Indeed, what I might have been I know not....Though I have constantly used all means of grace for twenty years, I am not a Christian.”On June 27, 1766 he wrote to Charles Wesley, “. . . and yet (this is the mystery) I do not love God. I never did. Therefore I never believed in the Christian sense of the word. Therefore I am only an honest heathen.”Comment by P.T. Forsythe :“It is a fatal mistake to think of holiness as a possession we have distinct from our faith and conferred upon it. That is a Catholic idea, still saturating Protestant Pietism. (see also Dieter, 14.)III. KeswickWith Keswick one finds a different situation than with the Holiness Movement. Whereas Wesleyan holiness theology is traceable directly to Wesley and has clearly identifiable tenets, Keswick is much more amorphous and comes in many varieties from the strict Keswick of a Major Ian Thomas, John Hunter, Alan Redpath and the Torchbearers fellowship to the milder Keswick of Campus Crusade For Christ and Moody Bible Institute and other respected Evangelical educational institutions. Whereas Holiness theology has tended to dominate in Arminian circles, Keswick has tended to dominate American Evangelicalism of a more Calvinistic bent. Indeed Packer asserts that it has become standard in virtually all of Evangelicalism except confessional Reformed and Lutheran.(151)A. Keswick OriginsIdeological roots: Holiness TheologyCharles Finney & Oberlin TheologyPhobe Palmer & Entire DevotionWilliam Boardman & The Higher Christian LifeHannah Whitehall Smith & The Christian Secret of a Happy LifeHistoric Origins:The term Keswick derives its name from a small community in the Lake district of England. In the wake of the Moody-Sankey campaigns there was an increased thirst for personal holiness and spiritual victory in the lives of many English Evangelicals. T. D. Harford-Battersby, vicar of Keswick was such a man. He had attended the Oxford meetings led by Robert Pearsall Smith and William Boardman 1874. (Bible.org) ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 63 pages 
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Youthful Piety, Godbey, W.B.
9 Godbey, W.B. Youthful Piety
Cincinnati, OH God's Revivalist Press 1909 1st Thus; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Tan cover with black print. Booklet has former owners name on front. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall 
Price: 29.97 USD
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10 Hames, Rev. J. M. Spiritual Shocks
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1940 First Edition; 1st Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Blue cover with black print. Very clean contents. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo; 52 pages 
Price: 14.97 USD
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11 Harris, Reader Power for Service The Personality and Work of the Holy Spirit
London, England Christian Literature Crusade 1953 Sixth Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Rare copy. Very clean. Richard Reader Harris, from the Wheaton College Archives and Special Collections.Richard Reader Harris, from the Wheaton College Archives & Special Collections.Reader Harris (Reader appears to be his Christian name, though occasionally he seems to go by the name Richard Reader Harris) was born in 1847. His father was Chief Constable of Worcestershire. The younger Reader Harris became an engineering apprentice on the railways, but was desperate to travel, keeping a bag packed ready to leave immediately if need be. His chance came when Bolivia required a young engineer to develop their railways, and he spent a year there. On returning to Great Britain, he trained as a lawyer, was called to Gray’s Inn and took silk. In his spiritual journey, he had become an agnostic. However he was increasingly influenced by Christian literature, and was converted in 1884. The moment of his conversion happened, appropriately enough, on a train. He was travelling west through London, and heard the station announcement “Ealing! Ealing! Ealing!” as “Healing! Healing! Healing!” He desired that healing, committed himself to Christ, and missed his stop.; 12mo; 48 pages 
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Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, Ironside, H. A
12 Ironside, H. A Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet
Neptune City, NJ Loizeaux Bros 1968 Second Edition; Twentieth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust in excellent condition and covered in mylar cover.. Has fold out chart. Former owners name in front. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; Lectures on Daniel the Prophet; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 253 pages 
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Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised), Ironside, H.A.
13 Ironside, H.A. Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised)
Bible Truth Depot 1954 First Edition; Eighth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Fair dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight and now in mylar cover. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 126 pages 
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14 Ironside, Henry A. Addresses on the Epistles of John and an Exposition on the Epistle of Jude
Loizeaux Brothers, Incorporated 1948 New Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has minor chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission. 
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Le Livre des elus, ou Jesus Crucifie, Jean-Baptiste de Saint Jure
15 Jean-Baptiste de Saint Jure Le Livre des elus, ou Jesus Crucifie
Paris, France Chez Charles-Pierre Berton 1771 Second Edition; First Printing Hardcover Fair with no dust jacket 
Original 171 edition translatesThe Book of the Elect, or Jesus Crucified. Leather cover very worn and hing cracked but not loose. End papers missing, title page and contents complete and in good condition. See Scan. Minor water stain on 391-406. Written in French. Rare 1771 edition. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Jesuit spiritual director and writer; b. Metz, France, Feb. 19, 1588; d. Paris, April 30, 1657. Saint-Jure entered the Society of Jesus on Sept. 4, 1604, and taught grammar and philosophy for a time. In 1645 and 1646 he was spiritual director at the College of Clermont. He served as rector of Amiens, Alençon, and Orleans and later was in charge of the professed house at Paris. He spent some time in England during the reign of Charles I. Many mystics came to him throughout his life for spiritual direction—among them the Baron of Renty and Mother Jeanne of the Angels. He also acted as spiritual director for the cloistered Dominican nuns of Paris, an exceptional position for a Jesuit. The superior of the convent, Mother Elizabeth of the Child Jesus, wrote in glowing terms of his inspirational guidance in bringing her Dominicans safely through the storm of Jansenism.; French Edition; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 406 pages 
Price: 249.97 USD
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Volks- Und Heimatkunde Des Politischen Bezirkes Hohenelbe Und Der Deutschen Gemeinden Der Im Westen Angrenzenden Gerichtsbezirke Neupakau Und Starkenbach. Unter Mitwirkung Von Mitgliedern Des Arnauer Und Des Hohenelber Lehr, JIRASEK, FRANZ JOS (JOSF)
16 JIRASEK, FRANZ JOS (JOSF) Volks- Und Heimatkunde Des Politischen Bezirkes Hohenelbe Und Der Deutschen Gemeinden Der Im Westen Angrenzenden Gerichtsbezirke Neupakau Und Starkenbach. Unter Mitwirkung Von Mitgliedern Des Arnauer Und Des Hohenelber Lehr
Marktoberdorf/Allgau Heimatkreis Holhenelbe/ Risengebirge E.V. 1986 Reprint; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
1986 reprint. Two volume set. Red covers with black engraving and gold print on cover. Written in German. This is the 1986 reprint of the first edition 1907-1915. Written in German with rough translation from German " Outside titled "History of the High Elber district." - First to geostatistics and geophysics, weather, flora & fauna, people and life of the people (dialect, dress, etc., folklore, superstitions, habits and customs, legends and folk tales), agriculture, trade and industry, trade u . traffic, spiritual culture, political conditions, welfare services ... In particular, the local churches Spindleruv Mlyn, Friedrichstal, Krause chalets, Ochs ditch Hackel, Upper Hohenelbe, Hohenelbe, Harta; Hennersdorf Pelsdorf, Pomeranian village Niederhof, Upper Langenau means Langenau low Langenau Schwarzental, Lauterwasser, forestry, Mönchdorf, Porsch joke, Arnau, Polke village, Moors Hermann iron, Arnsdorf, Tschermna, Kottwitz, upper and Lower oil, oil-Döberney, Kleinborowitz, Anseith, Oberprausnitz, Niederprausnitz, Switschin, Grossborowitz, Nedarsch, Widach, Stupna, Stückau, Starkenbach, Huttendorf, Benetzko. - With a "look back at the years 1915-1985" in Vol 1 (it references to "meritorious Riesengebirgler" as the musicologist Paul Nettl (1889-1972) and the writer Franz Fühmann (1922-1984)" Scarce.; National and local history of the district chief of the German Elbe River and the communities in the West and neighboring jur; Vol. 1 & 2; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall 
Price: 24.97 USD
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17 JOHNSON, James Weldon God's Trombones Seven Negro Sermons in Verse
Viking 1957 Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by Aaron Johnson 
Reddish cloth cover with sand colored spine and reddish-brown print. Lettering by C. B. Falls. Contents clean with some minor wear to cover. Has former owners paper label in front. Wonderflul block print illustrations. Negro spiritual verses include, Let My People Go, Go Down Death, The Creation, Listen Lord-A Prayer. Scarce. ; Drawings; 56 pages 
Price: 29.67 USD
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The Beth El story,  With a history of the Jews in Michigan before 1850,, Katz, Irving I
18 Katz, Irving I The Beth El story, With a history of the Jews in Michigan before 1850,
Wayne University Press 1955 First Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Blue-Grey cloth cover with gold print. This is a history of the Jewish Temple in Detroit named Beth El. It includes a history of the Jews in Michigan. "Bethel (, "House of God")—also written as Beth El or Beth-El—was an ancient Israelite town, located about ten miles north of Jerusalem, famous for its shrine. According to the biblical account, altars were established at Bethel by both Abraham and Jacob, and the latter described it as a place of awesome spiritual power (Gen. 28:17). Bethel also housed the Ark of the Covenant during the period of the judges, when it was also a sacred place to offer sacrifices to God and receive oracles from God." ; Photos and illustrations; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 238 pages 
Price: 11.97 USD
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Pentecostal sanctification and other topics, Keen, S. A
19 Keen, S. A Pentecostal sanctification and other topics
Apollo, PA M.W. Knapp N.D. First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Paperback edition. Reprint of the 1897 edition?A Gold mine of Spiritual Truths to Bless the Soul. Has small stainin on front. See Scan. Scarce. ; 99 pages 
Price: 16.97 USD
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W.D. Howells, Traveler From Altruria 1889-1894, Kirk, Clara Marburg
20 Kirk, Clara Marburg W.D. Howells, Traveler From Altruria 1889-1894
Rutgers University Press 1962 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Dust has chips, but now in mylar protective cover. The author assembled some of the writing of Howell. William Dean Howells (March 1, 1837 – May 11, 1920) was an American realist novelist, literary critic, and playwright, nicknamed "The Dean of American Letters". He was particularly known for his tenure as editor of The Atlantic Monthly, as well as for his own prolific writings, including the Christmas story "Christmas Every Day" and the novels The Rise of Silas Lapham and A Traveler from Altruria. Howells was a Christian socialist whose ideals were greatly influenced by Russian writer Leo Tolstoy.[21] He joined a Christian socialist group in Boston between 1889 and 1891[22] and attended several churches, including the First Spiritual Temple and the Church of the Carpenter, the latter being affiliated with the Episcopal Church and the Society of Christian Socialists.[23] These influences led him to write on issues of social justice from a moral and egalitarian point of view, being critic of the social effects of industrial capitalism.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 148 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
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