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The Shepherd of the Ocean  An Account of Sir Walter Raleigh and His Times, Adamson, Jack H. & H. F. Folland
1 Adamson, Jack H. & H. F. Folland The Shepherd of the Ocean An Account of Sir Walter Raleigh and His Times
Gambit Inc Pubns 1969 0876450184 / 9780876450185 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Stated first printing. Book looks new, dust has very minor rubs. Sir Walter Raleigh (1552 (or 1554) – 29 October 1618), also spelled Ralegh was an English landed gentleman, writer, poet, soldier, politician, courtier, spy and explorer. Raleigh was born to a Protestant family in Devon, the son of Walter Raleigh and Catherine Champernowne. Little is known of his early life, though he spent some time in Ireland, in Killua Castle, Clonmellon, County Westmeath, taking part in the suppression of rebellions and participating in the Siege of Smerwick. The author Jack Hale Adamson (1918–1975) was a literary scholar, biographer, teacher, and university administrator. This book was named a "Notable Book of 1969" by the New York Times. He was a Mormon and served as a missionary in Edinburg, Scotland in 1938-39. (Wikipedia) Fully indexed with bibliography.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 464 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
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2 Alspach, Russell K Irish poetry, from the English invasion to 1798,
H. Milford, Oxford University Press 1943 First Edition Hardcover Fine with no dust jacket 
This book contains Irish poetry from the English invasion of 1167 to the eighteenth century. 139 pages and fully indexed. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 
Price: 12.90 USD
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Book of Common Prayer, and Administration of the Sacraments, and Other rites and Ceremonies of the Church, According to the use of the United Church of England and Ireland.illuminated and Illustrated with Engravings from the works of the Great Painters, Anon
3 Anon Book of Common Prayer, and Administration of the Sacraments, and Other rites and Ceremonies of the Church, According to the use of the United Church of England and Ireland.illuminated and Illustrated with Engravings from the works of the Great Painters
London John Murray 1845 1st Edition Thus; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with No dust jacket as issued Illustrated by Great Painters 
Maroon leather hard bound with gilt decorative edge on cover and gilt design on spine. Gilt page edges all three sides. Worn at edges and where boards attach to spine. Title page in red and black surrounded by an ornamental gilt border, each page chromolithographed in red and black with ruled borders, decorative designs, initial letters, and with vignette illustrations and full-page chromo plates highlighted in gold. Marbled endpapers. Some foxing to pages. Engravings throughout and beautiful illuminated borders to many of the pages along with colored scripts and designs. ; B & W Photos, Color illustrations; Large 8vo 9" - 10" tall; 484 pages 
Price: 449.97 USD
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4 Bartholomew, J.G. (editor) The Citizen's Atlas of the World 1898 Map of Scotland Section 3 including ARgyll, Perth, Mull, Jura, Islay, Antrim Wigtown, with inset of Glasglow and some of Ireland
London George Newnes, Limited 1898 First Edition; Various Map Very Good with no dust jacket 
Color Map is in sleeve and may have minor soiling to edges.Taken from theCitizens Atlas of the World, published by Newnes, etc. in Southhampton Street, 1898. Bartholomew was a cartographer, born in Edinburgh, EC Scotland, UK. He studied at Edinburgh, then entered his father's firm. His works include the Survey Atlas of Scotland (1895–1912) and a Physical Atlas of the World (2 vols, 1889–1911). He is best known for his system of layer colouring of contours. These are NOT reprints they are directly from the 1898 Atlas which was damaged with the loss of some original maps. Shows major transportation routes, including railways, rivers, lakes, town names, territorial names, township names, county names, land masses, sailing routes, steamer routes, Caravan routes, etc. Map now in archival sleeve and backing board. These maps give a very contrasting view of the World in 1898 as compared to today in light of globalization. Other maps available. Scarce in this condition. Great reference and for framing.; Color Map; 14x18 inches 
Price: 71.97 USD
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Notes on the Bradleys of L"Avenir, Bradley, Wesley Hyndman, Q.C.
5 Bradley, Wesley Hyndman, Q.C. Notes on the Bradleys of L"Avenir
North Hatley Author 1984 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Blue grey cover with gold lettering. Notes by author on the genealogy of O'Brollachain or Bradley (the English Name) from the common ancestor William Bradley (1800-1874) who came to Canada in 1832 from Ireland. One writer asserts that the family is descended from the Bradleys of Durham, England. Full appendix with names. Scarce if not Rare. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 76 pages 
Price: 89.97 USD
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Life and Journal of Mrs. Hester Ann Rogers, Davies, Rev. E.
6 Davies, Rev. E. Life and Journal of Mrs. Hester Ann Rogers
Reading, MA Holiness Book Concern 1882 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Green cover with gold print. Wear to edge and top and bottom of spine frayed. Block print of Ms. Rogers opposite title page. Front hinge is cracked but not loose. Endpaper is loose. Contents clean. Hester Rogers (31 January 1756 – 10 October 1794) was a British Methodist writer. Hester Ann Roe was born in Macclesfield at the end of January in 1756. She had a strict but caring upbringing. She was confirmed in 1769 by the Bishop of Chester, Edmund Keene, into the Church of England. She dated her conversion to Methodism to 11 November 1774 after hearing Samuel Bardsley preach. He was one of John Wesley's Methodist itinerant preachers. Hester began a lifelong correspondence with the Methodist founder John Wesley after meeting him in 1776.She was a Methodist class leader and one her students was Agnes Bulmer. Hester visited the sick. Five years later she met another Methodist preacher named James Rogers and his wife Ann. His wife died in February 1784 after childbirth and in line with Ann's wishes James married Hester in the following August. They both then went to evangelise in Ireland. Rare. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 191 pages 
Price: 79.97 USD
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7 Fennell, Desmond The Changing Face of Catholic Ireland
Corpus Books Washington 1968 0225275252 / 9780225275254 
1st edition. Hardback fine/very good dust A Major workon the modern history of Catholic Ireland. ; 
Price: 19.56 USD
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The English in Ireland in the Eighteenth Century, 3 vol. set, Froude, James Anthony
8 Froude, James Anthony The English in Ireland in the Eighteenth Century, 3 vol. set
New York Scribner, Armstrong, and Co. 1873 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Author inscribed in all three volumes on back of title page the following inscription with his signature. "Charles Scribner & Co. of No 654 Broadway New York have authority from me to publish further all works which I have already written or may hearafter write, J. A. Froude, Author, Jan 29, 1871." Brown cloth cover with gold lettering shows some rubs and wear to top and bottom of spine area. Clean contents and Not X Library. Hinges show some weakness otherwise tight. The first volume says "in two volumes", but author added a third volume which is part of this set. James Anthony Froude (Froude rhymes with rood) (April 23, 1818 – October 20, 1894) was an English historian. He was the brother of the Anglo-Catholic polemicist Richard Hurrell Froude and of William Froude, the engineer and naval architect.The son of R. H. Froude, archdeacon of Totnes, he was born at Dartington, Devon. He was educated at Westminster School and Oriel College, Oxford, then the centre of the ecclesiastical revival now called the Oxford Movement. He obtained a second class degree, but won the Chancellor's English essay prize, and was elected a fellow of Exeter College (1842). "So too, in his English in Ireland (1872-1874), which was written to show the futility of attempts to conciliate the Irish, he exaggerates the bad points of the Irish, touches lightly on English atrocities, and emphasizes the influence of Roman Catholicism." was an English historian, novelist, biographer, and editor of Fraser's Magazine. From his upbringing amidst the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement, Froude intended to become a clergyman, but doubts about the doctrines of the Anglican church, published in his scandalous 1849 novel The Nemesis of Faith. (Wiki). Extremely rare work with this inscription. ; Author Signed; Signed by Author 
Price: 119.97 USD
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The Plan Book, a Little Journey to Ireland Vol V, No 1, September, George, Marian (editor)
9 George, Marian (editor) The Plan Book, a Little Journey to Ireland Vol V, No 1, September
Chicago, Il A Flanagan Company 1901 First Edition; First Printing Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Original not reprint. Green cover black print. Vol V, No. 1 for Intermediate and Upper Grades. An informative book on Ireland during this poverty period of 1901. Contains historical information, music, map, Poetry, and etc. Rare original. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.; Photographs, Maps; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 106 pages; 
Price: 27.97 USD
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Doak Family History and Genealogy, Hanes, B. E.
10 Hanes, B. E. Doak Family History and Genealogy
Clarksburg, W. Va. The Exponent Job Shop 1925 PhotoCopy; First Impression Manila Folder or Binder Very Good+ with no dust jacket 
Photocopy only of 1st edition. Some historical background and excellent genealogical charts. " Robert Doak, the sone of Samuel and Elizabeth Doak who came to this country from Ireland, was born in Fayette County, Pa in 1804. Removed with his father's family to Tyler County, Virginia (now W. Va.) in 1825. The same year he married Mary Ireland, whose famil also came from Pa." ..Robert Doak had two occupations, that of farmer and preacher of the Gospel. He was one of the founders of the Arnold creek Chruch of Christ. Contains a full name index .Rare. ; Photocopy Only; Oblong 8vo 8" to 9"; 100 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, Ironside, H. A
11 Ironside, H. A Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet
Neptune City, NJ Loizeaux Bros 1968 Second Edition; Twentieth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust in excellent condition and covered in mylar cover.. Has fold out chart. Former owners name in front. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; Lectures on Daniel the Prophet; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 253 pages 
Price: 26.97 USD
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Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised), Ironside, H.A.
12 Ironside, H.A. Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised)
Bible Truth Depot 1954 First Edition; Eighth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Fair dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight and now in mylar cover. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 126 pages 
Price: 17.97 USD
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13 Ironside, Henry A. Addresses on the Epistles of John and an Exposition on the Epistle of Jude
Loizeaux Brothers, Incorporated 1948 New Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has minor chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission. 
Price: 26.97 USD
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Montooth and the Canfield Witch, Jay, Robert & Meghan S. Christian & Lauren Ireland
14 Jay, Robert & Meghan S. Christian & Lauren Ireland Montooth and the Canfield Witch
Ruskin, Fl Cloverleaf Corporation 2009 0615296459 / 9780615296456 First Edition; Various Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Book looks almost new. Inscribed and signed by author. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Though originally written for adults, Montooth has become a Crossover sensation as teens embraced it. Montooth has been garnering a number of awards including the number one position on the recommended reading list in the Anniversary Issue of My Magazine for Girls, Atlanta; Florida Writers Association's Royal Palm Award for Historical Fiction; and three awards from Young Voices Foundation, Virginia: Adult Fiction, Juvenile /Adult Fiction, and Mystery/Suspense". Rare author signed. ; Montooth Quintet; 9.10 X 6.10 X 1.50 inches; 441 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 19.97 USD
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The Fighting Sailor turned Peaceable Chirstian: manifested in the Convincement and Conversion of Thomas Lurting with a short relation of many great dangers, and wonderful deliverances, he met, Lurting, Thomas
15 Lurting, Thomas The Fighting Sailor turned Peaceable Chirstian: manifested in the Convincement and Conversion of Thomas Lurting with a short relation of many great dangers, and wonderful deliverances, he met
Leeds, England Davies and Booth 1816 Later Printing; First Impression Ephemera Very Good with no dust jacket 
Uneven cut paper has been rebound using beautiful marbled paper boards, gold on black title, Parchment end papers with buffered and restored text block. Very handsome presentation of the 1816 printing. There is foxing to the original pages. The recent pirate activities on the horn of Africa have sparked interest in a phenomenon which in the years of yore characterised the high seas i.e. hostage taking. Combating this ill is the primary objective of the present treatise. Through his autobiographical narrative, The Fighting Sailor Turn'd Peaceable Christian, Thomas Lurting (1632-1713) distinguishes himself as one of the emblematic defendants of the early Quaker ideals for International Peace. In this treatise Lurting takes the fight for these ideals to the maritime scene. Most of the narrative takes place on board the Bristol Frigot, ship on board of which he was convinced. Despite staunch opposition facing the rise of Quakerism in the maritime milieu, which at the time was characterised by the spirit of belligerence, the determination of Quakers to die for their convictions, their pacific resistance ended up appealing to many a seaman who became convinced also. Numerous warring and fighting scenes constitute the ingredients for Lurting's plot development. And most especially the " ... True Account of George Pattison's Being Taken by the Turks; and How Redeemed by ..., Without Bloodshed, Putting the Turks on Shoar in their Own Country ..." Lurting makes of this episode the turning point around which he articulates his spiritual journey to illustrate the very Quaker ideal for an everlasting universal brotherhood and pacifism. Thomas Lurting was born in 1632, probably in Ireland. But he spent his childhood in London where at the age of fourteen he was impressed and forcefully taken to war in Ireland where he spent roughly two years. Upon his return to London, he was turned over into the Bristol Frigot, one of the war vessels belonging to Admiral Blake's fleet. On board this same ship he became convinced of the evils of war and decided to quit warring for the merchant service. He was however impressed many a times into the navy. He published his spiritual autobiography, The Fighting Sailor Turn'd Peaceable Christian. in 1710. Three years later, he passed away on the 30th March 1713, at the age of 81 in London and was laid to rest at Burmondsey. There is also an account of Lurting's mate George Pattison being taken by the Turks in 1663. Rare imprint.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 32 pages 
Price: 169.97 USD
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16 Lyall:, Edna The Autobiography of a Slander.
New York, NY London: Longmans, Green and co, 1892. 1892 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket Illustrated by L. Speed 
Beautiful book. Dark blue cover with gold, silver and grey image depicting Slander’s avenger riding through the night perched upon a giant bat before a crescent moon, quill & book in hand. Page edges gilt. “Lyall” was a Unitarian of the liberal persuasion who argued for women’s suffrage, English injustices in Ireland, and the immorality of the Boer War. In this title she shows how a freedom loving Russian Democrat is destroyed by the false label of ‘nihilist’. Other books she published were Donovan, We Two, In the Golden Days, Knight Errant, etc. Sadleir 1454a. Wolff 4206.; Drawings 
Price: 99.97 USD
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17 MacKintosh, C. H. The Great Commission
Loizeaux Brothers 1966 Second Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Of all the groups of Christian believers that developed in the English-speaking world in the nineteenth century, the one which produced the greatest number of gifted writers was the Brethren. Of their founder himself, John Nelson Darby, over fifty substantial volumes were published. But of all this notable group of writers, the one whose works have been most frequently printed is C. H. Mackintosh, generally known as C.H.M., which is all that appeared on the title pages of his major writings.C. H. Mackintosh was born in October 1820, at Glenmalure Barricks, County Wicklow, Ireland, the son of the captain of a Highland regiment. Mackintosh was converted at the age of eighteen through the letters of a devout sister, and the prayerful reading of J. N. Darby's Operations of the Spirit. When he was twenty-four years of age, he opened a private school at Westport, but it was not long before he concluded he must give himself entirely to the ministry of the Word of God, in writing and in public speaking. Soon thereafter he felt led to establish a periodical, which he continued to edit for twenty-one years, Things New and Old.Mr. Mackintosh took a great interest in, and actively participated in, the great revival of 1859 and 1860. He died on November 2, 1896, and was buried in Cheltenham Cemetery, awaiting the resurrection morn.Now that more than one hundred years have passed since his death, it is difficult to come upon much factual detail concerning his own personal life. He was a man of a much milder spirit than J N Darby, and breathed an atmosphere of deep devotion, and a love not only for Christian believers but for lost souls. He had a gracious spirit, avoiding conflict as far as possible.Mr. Mackintosh's fame rests primarily upon the work, Notes on the Pentateuch, beginning with a volume of 334 pages on Genesis, and concluding with a two-volume work on Deuteronomy extending to over 800 pages.Another series by Mr. Mackintosh also was frequently reprinted, under the general heading of Miscellaneous Writings, seven volumes, totalling over 2500 pages, and most of it still definitely worth reading.Let me especially call attention to Mr. Mackintosh's excellent comments on Evangelization, which seem to be remarkably up-to-date in this time when we are witnessing so much world-wide evangelization. In volume 4 is a very thorough, illuminating, and sensible discussion of ninety pages on the Great Commission of Luke 24: 44-49. His statements at the very beginning are refreshing to read:"Our divine Master called upon sinners to repent and believe the gospel. Some would have us to believe that it is a mistake to call upon persons dead in trespasses and sins to do anything. "How," it is argued, "can those who are dead repent? They are incapable of any spiritual movement. They must first get the power ere they can either repent or believe."What is our reply to all this? A very simple one indeed--our Lord knows better than all the theologians in the world what ought to be preached. He knows all about man's condition--his guilt, his misery, his spiritual death, his utter helplessness, his total inability to think a single right thought, to utter a single right word, to do a single right act; and yet He called upon men to repent. This is quite enough for us. It is no part of our business to seek to reconcile seeming differences. It may seem to us difficult to reconcile man's utter powerlessness with his responsibility; but "God is His own interpreter, and He will make it plain." It is our happy privilege, and our bounder duty, to believe what He says, and do what He tells us. This is true wisdom, and it yields solid peace. ... Our Lord preached repentance, and He commanded His apostles to preach it; and they did so constantly.Because many are teaching otherwise, one rejoices to see the author's emphasis on the need for genuine repentance. In volume 3 there is a section of eighty-six pages with the general heading, "Papers on Evangelism," in the midst of which is a long and excellent commentary of Acts 16: 8-31. A few lines from these rich pages:"We increasingly feel the immense importance of an earnest, fervent gospel testimony everywhere; and we dread exceedingly any falling off therein. We are imperatively called to "do the work of an evangelist," and not to be moved from that work by any arguments or considerations whatsoever ....We observe, with deep concern, some who were once known amongst us as earnest and eminently successful evangelists, now almost wholly abandoning their work and becoming teachers and lecturers.This is most deplorable. We really want evangelists. A true evangelist is almost as great a rarity as a true pastor. Alas! alas! how rare are both! The two are closely connected ....We are perfectly aware of the fact that there is in some quarters a strong tendency to throw cold water upon the work of evangelization. There is a sad lack of sympathy with the preacher of the gospel; and, as a necessary consequence, of active co-operation with him in his work ....We have invariably found that those who think and speak slightingly of the work of the evangelist are persons of very little spirituality; and on the other hand, the most devoted, the most true-hearted, the best taught saints of God, are always sure to take a profound interest in that work ....But I find in the Gospels, and in the Acts of the Apostles, that a quantity of most blessed evangelistic work was done by persons who were not specially gifted at all, but who had an earnest love for souls, and a deep sense of the preciousness of Christ and His salvation."In the midst of these papers, our author discusses what I think is very rare in his writing, his own participation in the great revival in 1859 in Ulster.; Miscellaneous Writings Volume IV 
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18 Mathews, Anthony Origin of the McKennas with a History of the Sept
Anthony Mathews Dublin, Ireland 1972 First Edition Paperback Very Good 
Folded map. map "The Kennas or McKennas are a Co. Monaghan Sept and derive their name and descent from Cionaodh. "We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 
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Origin of the McKennas with a History of the Sept, Mathews, Anthony
19 Mathews, Anthony Origin of the McKennas with a History of the Sept
Dublin, Ireland Anthony Mathews 1972 0902938053 / 9780902938052 PhotoCopy; First Impression Manila Folder or Binder Very Good with no dust jacket 
Photocopy only. "The Kennas or McKennas are a Co. Monaghan Sept and derive their name and descent from Cionaodh. " We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Includes maps. Tracking provided on U.S. orders. ; Photocopy Only; 4to 11" - 13" tall; 
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20 McAllister, Lester G. Thomas Campbell Man of the Book
St. Louis, MO Bethany Press 1954 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Orange cover, no dust. Inscribed in November 1958 and signed by author. Born 1 February 1763 in County Down, Ireland. Immigrated to the United States in 1807, settling in western Pennsylvania. In 1809, Campbell published The Declaration and Address of the Christian Association of Washington, a document stating his ideas about how the Christian faith should be practiced.It was a starting point for the Campbell–Stone Movement, which led to development of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the Churches of Christ and the Christian churches and churches of Christ. In 1812, Campbell joined his son Alexander and began practicing baptism by immersion.Shortly after his oldest son, Alexander Campbell, was ordained in 1812, Thomas began playing a supporting role to Thomas was generally less radical than his son, and was a stabilizing influence on the movement.Thomas died on 4 January 1854 in Bethany, West Virginia and was buried next to his wife in the Campbell family cemetery. Thomas and Alexander Campbell were the most prominent leaders of the Disciples of Christ movement of the early 19th century. The group was committed to restoring primitive Christianity. It merged with the Christians (Stone Movement) in 1832 to form what is now described as the American Restoration Movement (also known as the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement). Other prominent individuals in the Restoration Movement included Barton W. Stone, Walter Scott and "Raccoon" John Smith.; Signed by Author 
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