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HEART OF THE CITY History of the First Presbyterian Church, Orlando, Florida, 1876-1987., Abberger, Nancy Hardy
1 Abberger, Nancy Hardy HEART OF THE CITY History of the First Presbyterian Church, Orlando, Florida, 1876-1987.
Orlando, FL First Presbyterian Church 1988 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed "Best Wishes, Nancy Abberger" on Title page. Blue coverwith gold lettering. Book looks new. Extensive history of this church located in Orlando,Fl. Has extensive name index for genealogial and historical research.This history is an attempt to compile from many sources a narrative account of the churches' past as a congregation. It is not intended as a research volume. The Table of Contents allows for the ease of the reader to go directly to the age period he is most interested in, without there being some ambiguity. A chronology of the life of the church is in the back of the book.Book has plastic cover for protection. Excellent condition. ; 9.25 X 6.25 X 1.50 inches; Signed by Author 
Price: 17.97 USD
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2 Author, No Children's Mission Cook Book
Canton, OH Children's Mission of Ohio 1920 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
This is the Childrens Mission cook book from the Children's Mission in Canton Ohio. Numerous contributors included. Fully Indexed. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Contains a famous quote “We may live without poetry, music, and art;We may live without conscience, and live without heart;We may live without friends; we may live without books;But civilized man cannot live without cooks.He may live without books,—what is knowledge but grieving? 20He may live without hope,—what is hope but deceiving?He may live without love,—what is passion but pining?But where is the man that can live without dining?”? Edward Robert Bulwer-Lytton ; Missing 1/08 
Price: 9.97 USD
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70 Songs 1890-1920 All Organ, Words, Chords, Music, Big 3 Music Corp.
3 Big 3 Music Corp. 70 Songs 1890-1920 All Organ, Words, Chords, Music
Big 3 Music Corp. 1976 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Contains 70 unforgettable classic song: Aba daba honeymoon ; After the ball ; Alice blue gown ; Aloha oe ; Anchors aweigh ; At the jazz band ball ; Band played on ; Beautiful Ohio ; Because ; Bill Bailey, won't you please come home? ; Bird in a gilded cage ; Chlo-e ; Clarinet marmalade ; Come back to Sorrento ; Come, Josephine in my flying machine ; Darktown strutters' ball ; Fascination ; Frankie and Johnny ; Give my regards to Broadway ; Hello! Ma baby ; He's got the whole world in his hands ; I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier ; I love you truly ; I wish I had a girl ; Ida! Sweet as apple cider ; I'm always chasing rainbows ; I'm sorry I made you cry ; In my merry Oldsmobile ; In the good old summertime ; In the sweet by and by ; Ireland must be heaven ; Ja-da ; Johnson rag ; K-K-K-Katy ; Let me call you sweetheart ; Liebestraum ; Li'l Liza Jane ; Love's old sweet song ; Mary's a grand old name ; Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ; Meet me to-night in dreamland ; Melody of love ; M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I ; M-O-T-H-E-R ; My gal Sal ; O perfect love ; O sole mio ; Oh promise me! ; On the beach at Waikiki ; Over there ; Peg o' my heart ; Peggy O'Neil ; Rose room --Sensation ; Sidewalks of New York ; Song of love ; Sweet Adeline ; Sweet Rosie O'Grady ; Sweetest story ever told ; Ten little fingers and ten little toes; There's a broken heart for every light on Broadway ; Tiger rag ; Wabash blues ; Wabash Cannon Ball ; Washington and Lee swing ; What do you want to make those eyes at me for? ; When you wore a tulip ; Yankee doodle boy ; You tell me your dream ; You're a grand old flag. ; Home Library Series, Vol. 1; 4to 11" - 13" tall; 144 pages 
Price: 29.97 USD
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Graphic Aids To Angiology Series 2- the Venous System, Boots, Chester and Shirley
4 Boots, Chester and Shirley Graphic Aids To Angiology Series 2- the Venous System
Long Beach CA Scientific Illustratiors 1957 Revised Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Detailed graphic illustrations with scientific/medical names. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Illustrations and drawings 
Price: 9.97 USD
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Ancestral Histories of Scott Bullitt and Dorthy Stimson, Bullitt, Stimson
5 Bullitt, Stimson Ancestral Histories of Scott Bullitt and Dorthy Stimson
Seattle, WA Willows Press 1994 First Edition; Third Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Black cover with gold print. Dust in brodart mylar protective cover! Large fold out family chart. Fully Indexed. Dorothy Stimson Bullitt was a radio and television pioneer who founded King Broadcasting Company, a major owner of broadcast stations in Seattle, Washington. She was the first woman in the United States to buy and manage a television station."Stimson Bullitt climbed mountains and rock faces, helped transform Seattle’s rundown 1st Avenue, served a decade as King Broadcasting Co. president, was a skilled appellate lawyer, championed civil liberties and environmental causes, was awarded a Purple Heart in the World War II Leyte landing, and earned a place on Richard Nixon’s enemies list." Historylink.org This book covers aspects of the American experience through the lives of about 400 people, linked by descent over twelve generations. Starting with George Yeardleys immigration to Virginia in 1610 and Thomas Rogerss immigration to Massachusetts in 1620, the story ends in 1989 with Dorothy Stimsons death in Seattle. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Photographs; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 384 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Heart talks, Carradine, B
6 Carradine, B Heart talks
God's Revivalist Office 1899 Third Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Contents clean, pages tight. Back cover has discoloration. Edges show signs of edgewear, overall good copy. Has small paper label with Mrs. Dale Chappell's name and signed by F.L. Chappell from Nampa, Idaho the location of a Nazarene University. The Chappell name is notable in Holiness history. Born April 4, 1842, in Yazoo County, Mississippi, he moved with his family the Yazoo City in 1852. He served with the Confederate Army for the last five months of the Civil War. Educated at the University of Mississippi, he was ordained a Methodist elder in 1878. He served in parsonages in New Orleans and Mississippi.Carradine wrote 26 books which primarily advanced his religious beliefs. Several of his books were centered on the concept of sanctification. He also wrote about his opposition to the Louisiana lottery making an analogy between it and slavery. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.; 278 pages; p 
Price: 14.97 USD
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Sharpe's Triumph Richard Sharpe and the BAttle of Assaye, September 1803, Cornwell, Bernard
7 Cornwell, Bernard Sharpe's Triumph Richard Sharpe and the BAttle of Assaye, September 1803
London Harper Collins 1998 0002256304 / 9780002256308 1st UK; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
This is not an exlibrary, does not have price clipped, and is in excellent condition. Very clean contents, probably read only once. Now in mylar archival dust cover to preserve condition. Has slight tilt. With the return of the brave English sergeant Richard Sharpe--here, to battle the mercenary forces of the Mahratta confederation in India in 1803--Bernard Cornwell claims his rightful place alongside Patrick O'Brian as a contemporary master of historical narrative. Sharpe's Triumph is a riveting story of betrayal and revenge that showcases the deft blend of suspenseful military adventure and sweeping historical detail that has made each new installment of the Richard Sharpe series a number one bestseller in Great Britain and around the world. In the four years since he earned his sergeant's stripes at the bloody siege of Seringapatam, young Richard Sharpe has lead a peaceful existence. But this relatively easy life meets with a brutal end when he is the sole survivor of a murderous attack at the hands of Major William Dodd, a cold-blooded English officer who has defected from the East India Company to join the mercenary forces of the Mahratta confederation.Sharpe rises from the killing field at Fort Chasalgaon vowing to avenge his dead comrades, even if it means pursuing the turncoat Dodd to the very ends of the continent. It is a quest that takes him deep into the heart of enemy territory, where the accepted rules of engagement have been discarded, where ever-shifting loyalties create an environment of dangerous uncertainty, forcing Sharpe to guard against attacks from enemy and friend.The paths of treachery ultimately lead to the small village of Assaye, where Sharpe's company joins the army of Sir Arthur Wellesley--the future Duke of Wellington--to take on the Mahratta horde. Outnumbered and outgunned, Wellesley bravely seizes an unexpected geographical advantage and charges into the white heat of a battle that will make his reputation. It is a bloody confrontation that will make Sharpe's name, too--but first he must survive the carnage and live to tell the tale of what will be remembered as one of the greatest battles of its century. May have minor dust spotting on top edge from shelf storage over time otherwise as new condition.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 400 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
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Bog-Myrtle & Peat, being tales, chiefly of Galloway, Gathered from the Years, Crockett, S.R.
8 Crockett, S.R. Bog-Myrtle & Peat, being tales, chiefly of Galloway, Gathered from the Years
New York D. Appleton & Company 1895 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Fair dust jacket 
Original 1895 hardback, not a reprint. Green decorative cover with gold print and design. Dust has chips around the edges and shows browning. Dust now in mylar protective cover. "Samuel Rutherford Crockett (24 September 1859 – 16 April 1914), who published under the name "S. R. Crockett", was a Scottish novelist. He was born at Duchrae, Balmaghie, Kirkcudbrightshire, on 24 September 1859, the illegitimate son of dairymaid Annie Crocket. He was raised on his grandfather's Galloway farm, won a bursary to Edinburgh University in 1876,and graduated from there during 1879. After some years of travel, he became in 1886 minister of Penicuik. During that year he produced his first publication, Dulce Cor (Latin: Sweet Heart), a collection of verse under the pseudonym Ford Brereton. He eventually abandoned the Free Church ministry for full-time novel-writing in 1895.(Wiki); 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 389 pages 
Price: 29.97 USD
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Studies in First Corinthians, Dehaan, M. R.
9 Dehaan, M. R. Studies in First Corinthians
Zondervan 1956 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good Signed by Author
Gift book plate in front signed by Author. Green cover with gold lettering. Yellow spotting to end papers and may have dark area in gutters. Contents clean. Martin R. DeHaan was born in Zeeland, Michigan to a cobbler who had emigrated from the Netherlands.[1]He graduated from Hope College in Holland, Michigan, and the University of Illinois College of Medicine, going on to be physician in Western Michigan.[1]He married in 1914 to Priscilla.[2]Pastor and teacherIn October 1921, he struggled for his life in a Grand Rapids hospital. He recalled this as a life-changing event. In early spring of 1922, he returned home from house calls and said, "I can't go on any longer. ... This is it!" He sold his medical practice, home, and office equipment.[2]De Haan attended the nearby Western Theological Seminary in Holland, Michigan. He pastored two churches in Grand Rapids and ran large Bible classes.[1]In 1938, one of the Bible classes in Detroit began being broadcast on radio at a fifty-watt station. Two national networks picked up the Radio Bible Class program, its coverage growing to 600 stations around the world at the time of De Haan's death.[1]He was involved in an automobile collision in July 1965 where he sustained serious injuries. Complications of a pre-existing heart condition prevented recovery; he died as he rested at home on December 13, 1965.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 192 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 25.97 USD
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10 Delavan, Elizabeth Upstate Village
New York , NY North Country Books 1975 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Fine in Very Good dust jacket 
Dust in brodart mylar protective cover! UPSTATE VILLAGE presents a picturesque account in anecdotal style of how the village of Seneca Falls in the heart of the beautiful Finger Lakes Region of upstate NewYork came into being. In a series of episodes it recounts how the town grew; how it prospered; who lived there, and what they did. It covers a period from 1787 to the beginning of World War I . . . The book abounds in rich Americana plus a ?avor all its own. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 96 pages 
Price: 8.97 USD
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The Youthful Haunts of Longfellow, Edwards, George Thornton
11 Edwards, George Thornton The Youthful Haunts of Longfellow
Portland, ME George T. Edwards 1907 Authors Edition; Various Hardcover Good with no dust jacket Signed by Author
This is the 1907 authors (first) edition. Green cover with gold lettering. Cover shows wear and corners dented. Pages have uneven cut with some uncut. "Presented by the Author, 1914 in ink and signed George Thornton Edwards in pencil on endpaper." There is a drawing by Ethel Ida Chase from a painting by G.P.A. Healey as a frontispiece. Numerous photos and illustrations throughout. Some browning to title page due to age. Printed by Smith and Sale in Portland, Maine. Edwards, George Thornton was born on May 6, 1868 in Annapolis, Maryland, United States. Son of Thomas and Mary J. (Peirce) Edwards. He set several of Longfellow’s poems to music, including “The Rainy Day,” “My Lost Youth,” etc. “My Heart’s in Tipperary Where the River Shannon Flows” and the “Soldier’s Parting Song,” sung by soldiers in Europe before United States entered the war, the latter having been translated into French, Italian and German. Rare signed edition. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.; Photographs, illustrations; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 203 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 179.97 USD
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Shot in the Heart, Gilmore, Mikal
12 Gilmore, Mikal Shot in the Heart
Doubleday 1994 First Edition; First Impression Slipcase Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket 
In black slipcase with gold lettering. Looks new. ; Special Booksellers Preview; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall 
Price: 7.97 USD
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Keswickism, Godbey, W.B.
13 Godbey, W.B. Keswickism
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Booklet's cover is detached and has chips. Contents complete. Rare work by Godbey on Keswickism. Rare if not unique. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life.II. Wesley and WesleyanismA. Wesley & SanctificationIn the theology of John Wesley one finds a new direction, distinct both from Reformed and classic Arminianism Wesley built his understanding of the nature of man solidly upon the Reformed position of original sin, and the subsequent necessity of divine grace for salvation. Here however he parted company with the reformers and injected the doctrine of prevenient grace, (all men have received of the Holy Spirit the ability to respond to God) into his understanding of the doctrine of salvation. Wesley rejected the Reformed concept of election , opting instead for the Arminian concept of conditional election. Thus he joined the Reformed doctrine of the total sinfulness of the individual and the primacy of grace with the Arminian stress on human freedom, with its subsequent moral obligations. But his doctrine of Sanctification was not traditional Arminianism Wesley was also heavily influenced by the mystics. Packer has observed that he superimposed“on the Augustinianism of the Anglican prayer book and the heaven aspiring High Church moralist in which he was reared a concept of perfection . . . that he had learned from the Greek Patristic sources. “Macarius the Egyptian” . . . and Ephraem Syrus were chief among these. There idea of perfection was not of sinlessness, but of an ever deepening process of all around moral change. To this idea Wesley then added the lesson he had learned form those whom he called the “mystic writers” (a category including the Anglican William Law, the Roman Catholics Molinos, Fenelon, Gaston de Renty, Francis de Sales, and Madame Guyon, the Lutheran Pietist Francke, and the pre-reformation Theologia Gremanica) The lesson was that the heart of true godliness is a motivating spirit of love to God and man; without this all religion is hollow and empty. (Keep In Step with the Spirit,134)Wesley asserted the primacy of justification, and the assurance the believer could have based upon the righteousness of Christ. However, his Arminian view of election creeps into his view of final salvation. He views the process of Sanctification as one of making the individual worthy of salvation. This process is a work of God, but it is also a work of man. At this point a synergism appears. At one point he explicitly states that good works are a condition of final justification which he regards as necessary for final salvation (Lindstrom, 207)B. Developments within WesleyanismAs Wesleyanism took root in America, it was institutionalized in the context of the circuit rider and revivalism. This had profound results on the form of the teaching. As early as 1784 Francis Asbury advocated preaching the experience of entire sanctification as one which believers should expect immediately by faith. Revivalism emphasized definable turning points in a Christian’s life as essential. Holiness preaching tended to center around Wesley’s sanctification teaching of a second crisis experience subsequent to justification which was commonly termed entire sanctification. From this followed it followed that it was the duty of those who had experienced entire sanctification to confess it and seek to bring others into this experience.As Methodism became respectable, there was a call for a return to the pure doctrine of Wesley. In the latter part of the nineteenth century the National holiness Association was born to promote Wesleyan-holiness theology. Three names are prominent in the promulgation of holiness theology: Phobe Palmer; William Boardman; and Hannah Whitehall Smith.Phobe Palmer’s emphasis becomes key here. Although she says nothing that Wesley did not say a century before, she changes the Wesleyan emphasis subtly, and injects presuppositions foreign to Wesley. Whereas with Wesley the experience of perfection was something to be sought, for Palmer it was vital for continuance of salvation. For Palmer the crisis was vital. Perfection was the beginning of the Christian life and growth in holiness and the focal point of the Christian life. The focus of sanctification tended to be wholly upon a single point of wholehearted commitment, and divorced from any gradual process. “Thus, the moment of death to self and birth to love readily became an end in itself--a goal rather than an essential element in the establishment of a new relationship of freedom and love in the hearts of believers as the Holy Spirit led them from grace to grace in the will of God. (Dieter, 41)C. Key PropositionsSecond Work Of Grace.For the holiness proponents particularly the second work of grace became vital for retaining one’s salvation. Palmer particularly sees justification as dependent upon the believer’s faithfulness. she states:“As I ascended the heavenly way, clearer light shone upon my mind, revealing higher duties, requiring more of the spirit of sacrifice, and furnishing yet stronger tests of obedience. but with increasing light, increasing strength was given, enabling me to be answerable to these higher duties: for I had not learned how to retain justification while under condemnation at the same time for neglecting known duties.”For Palmer the solution lay in sanctification, envisioned as a post conversion crisis. She termed this a crisis because for her the issue was the retention or loss of justification. again she states:“I saw I could not; I must either make the necessary sacrifices, or I must sin, and by my sin forfeit my state of justification. And here my justification would have ended with me had I refused to be holy.”Thus, the second work of grace is really the basis of one’s continuance in salvation.The means of achieving this second work of grace is conceived of as an act of faith akin to the act of faith involved in justification. William Boardman notes:“Whether the question relates to justification or sanctification, the answer is the same. The way of freedom from sin is the same as the way of freedom from condemnation. . . faith in the purifying presence of Jesus.” (Higher Christian Life, 81)This same mentality persists to this day. in the Spring of 1986 I attended a Sanctification Conference sponsored by the C&MA in Piedmont CA. The keynote speaker, the president of the denomination began his first sermon with the words, “There are two gospels, the gospel of justification is for the sinner, the gospel of sanctification for the saint.” Justification is seen as delivering from the penalty of sin, sanctification is seen to deliver from the power of sin.For Boardman, this work of grace is a mystical inauguration into a process:“In the one, atonement has been made, and the moment it is accepted, pardon is complete; in the other, although the righteousness of Christ is perfect in which the soul is to be clothed, yet the work of unfolding . . . is a work of time and progress.” (40)Hannah Whitehall Smith propounds the basic teaching of holiness theology by bifurcating justification and sanctification. Her contribution, no doubt reflecting her Quaker background was the injection of a quietism into the process. She envisions the process as an entire surrender to the Lord, and a perfect trust in Him. She envisions three steps to the process:(1) The Christian must realize the gift of God.“In order therefore to enter into a practical experience of this interior life, the soul must be in a receptive attitude, fully recognizing that it is God’s gift in Christ Jesus.” (The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life, 47)(2) Consecration is necessary.She states that the soul must be abandoned to God and lie passive in His hands (47) “To some minds the word ‘abandonment might express this idea better than the word consecration. But whatever word we use, we mean an entire surrender of the whole being to God--spirit soul and body placed under his absolute control, for Him to do with us as He pleases.”(3) Faith then follows surrender.“Love may be lavished upon us by another without stint or measure, but until we believe we are that we are loved, it never really becomes ours.” (51) She concludes: “In order to enter into this blessed interior life of rest and triumph, you have to take two steps--first entire abandonment; and second absolute faith. (52-54)While, holiness theologies come in many varieties and with various emphases, they all make the crucial disjuncture between justification, appropriated by faith and securing pardon form sin and sanctification/crisis/second work of grace/baptism by the spirit as a post conversion faith experience which breaks the power of sin.Sinlessness:In Wesley’s mind sin was primarily voluntary and was thus intimately bound up with the will. In a sermon on 1 John 3:9 speaking of the privilege of sinlessness he defined sin in a wholly voluntary manner.By sin I here understand outward sin, according to the plain common acceptation [sic] of the word; an actual, voluntary, transgression of the law of God; and of any commandment of God, acknowledged to be such, at the time it is transgressed.Elsewhere speaking of the nature of sin he declared:Not only sin, properly so called, (that is, a voluntary transgression of a known law) but sin, improperly so called, (that is an involuntary transgression of a divine law, known or unknown) needs the atoning blood.I believe there is no such perfection in this life as excludes these involuntary transgressions which I apprehend to be naturally consequent on the ignorance and mistakes inseparable from mortality.Therefore sinless perfection is a phrase I never use, lest I should seem to contradict myself.I believe a person filled with the love of God is still liable to these involuntary transgressions.Such transgressions you may call sin, if you please: I do not, for the reasons above-mentioned. (Works: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 19 (XI, 396)Wesley’s hamartiology “emphasized the willful or spiritual dimensions of sin more than the outward (moral) or cognitive (theoretical knowledge) aspects of it. Sinlessness in this context was more a matter of willing God’s will than replicating God’s perfect knowledge, action, or holiness; sin was more a matter of knowledgeable and willful rebellion against God’s will than a failure or lack of conformity to the glory of God.” (John Tyson, Charles Wesley on Sanctification (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1986) 257.)Christian Perfection:John Wesley saw Christian perfection which was available to all believers in this life as a gift from God and to be accomplished in a moment in time Christian Perfection is that love of God and our neighbor, which implies deliverance from all sin. That this is received merely by faith That it is given instantaneously, in one moment. That we are to expect it, not at death, but at any moment; that is, now is the accepted time, now is the day of this salvationJohn Wesley was adamant about the instantaneous nature of this perfection/sanctification. His brother Charles however more and more brought the process to the forefront as the years progressed.Wesley himself drew up a list of ten propositions concerning perfection which teach a progress-crisis-progress as a model for Christian perfection. In these propositions it can clearly be seen that Wesley does not understand the term teleios in the sense of mature (BAG,187) but rather in the sense of his own definition of sinlessness. There is such a thing as perfection: for it is again and again mentioned in Scripture. It is not so early as justification: for justified persons are to “go on to maturity.” (Heb. 6:1) It is not so late as death; for St. Paul speaks of living men that were perfect (Phil. 3:15) It is not absolute. Absolute perfection belongs not to man, nor to angels, but to God alone. It does not make a man infallible: None is infallible, while he remains in the body. It is sinless? It is not worthwhile to contend for a term. It is ‘salvation from sin.’ It is ‘perfect love.’ (I John 4:18) This is the essence of it; its properties, or inseparable fruits, are, rejoicing evermore, praying without ceasing, and in everything giving thanks. (I Thess. 5:16, etc.) It is improvable. It is so far from lying in an indivisible point, from being incapable of increase, that one perfected in love may grow in grace far swifter than he did before. It is amissible, capable of being lost; of which we have numerous instances. But we were not thoroughly convinced of this, till five or six years ago. It is constantly both preceded and followed by a gradual work.” (WORKS: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 25 (XI, 441-42)).As can be seen from the above quoted propositions, for Wesley perfection was not the equivalent of maturity, but it was to be equated with sinlessness (i.e. voluntary transgression), or love. He explained perfection elsewhere as “perfect love.” “I want you to be all love. This is the perfection I believe and teach.” He was careful not to set perfection too high, recognizing the dangers of “high-strained perfection” which he said led to a thousand nervous disorders. Such high-strained perfection (“so high as no man we have ever heard or read of attained [it]”) would have the unexpected result of driving Christian perfection out of the world.Entire Sanctification:This is “a personal, definitive work of God’s sanctifying grace by which the war within oneself might cease and the heart be fully released from rebellion into wholehearted love for God and others.” (Dieter, 17) This experience has negative and positive benefits. Negatively, it is seen as a cleansing of the heart, which heals the remaining systemic damage from Adam’s transgression. Positively, it, it is a freedom, “a turning of the whole heart toward God in love to seek and to know His will, which becomes the soul’s delight.” (Dieter, 18) Wesley listed the benefits of this sanctification: To love God with all one’s heart and one’s neighbor as oneself; To have the mind that is in Christ; To bear the fruit of the Spirit (in accordance with Gal. 5); The restoration of the image of God in the soul, a recovery of man to the moral image of God, which consists of righteousness and true holiness”; 5.Inward and outward righteousness, “holiness of life issuing from the heart”; God’s sanctifying of the person in spirit, soul and body; The person’s own perfect consecration to God; A continuous presentation through Jesus of the individual’s thoughts, words and actions as a sacrifice to God of praise and thanksgiving; Salvation from all sin. (Wesley, sermon “On Perfection”, Works 6, 413-15.)D. Scriptural SupportWesleyans claim that they approach Scripture holistically and do not rely on proof-texts for their doctrine, and that the holistic teaching of Scripture, its warp and woof, supports their doctrine of Sanctification. Nevertheless there are several passages which form the matrix of their understanding of the nature of sanctification. These include:Deut. 30:6Ezekiel 35:-26, 29Matt. 5:8, 48; 6;10Rom 2:29Rom 12:1-2 Therefore I urge you brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship.Phoebe Palmer a leader in the revival of Wesleyanism in the late 19th century gives a typical holiness exposition of this passage, placing it in the context of the altar of Exodus 29:37. According to Palmer, Christ is the believers altar. Since according to Exodus everything that touched the altar is holy, every Christian who was willing by faith to present himself without reservation as a living sacrifice upon the altar of the finished work of Christ would be entirely sanctified and cleansed from all sin. (Dieter, 39)2 Cor 3:17-18; 7:1Gal 2:20Ephesians 3:14-29; 5:27Phil 3:151 Thess. 5:23Titus 2:11-14;Heb. 6:1; 7:25; 10:14John 8:34-36;John 17:20-23:Commenting on the John 17 passage, Mildred Wynkoop has noted parallels with Ephesians 4:Jesus had in mind a spiritually unified body of believersThat would bring glory to Himself.He died to sanctify them. Al other elements of redemption were included but incidental to this.Sanctification was in word and in truth. This “word” obviously not the Scripture primarily, but was found in living fellowship with the living Word, who is himself Truth.The commission was accompanied by a moral fitness--for the unity of the spirit indicated in both passages is moral clear through.(Wynkoop Theology of Love, 320, cited by Dieter, 32)1 John 1:51 John 7-91 John 2:61 John 3:31 John 3:8-10In commenting on this passage Wesley based his whole thesis upon his definition if sin as voluntary transgression. (see above), James 1:4E. CritiqueRedefinition Of Terminology:The Reformed have for centuries taken Wesley to task for teaching sinless perfection. While this charge is not really accurate, for the reasons shown above, Wesley himself must bear the blame for this charge because of his own redefinition of terms. Packer notes:It was indeed confusing for Wesley to give the name perfection to a state which from many standpoints was one of continued imperfection. It was yet more confusing that he should define sin “properly so called”, subjectively, as “voluntary transgression of a known law,” rather than objectively, as failure, whether conscious or unconscious, voluntary or involuntary, to conform to God’s revealed standards. It was supremely confusing when he let himself speak of sanctified persons as being without sin ( because they were not consciously breaking any known law) while at the same time affirming that they need the blood of Christ every moment to cover their actual shortcomings. Wesley himself insisted that by the objective standard of God’s “perfect law,” every sanctified sinner needs pardon every day; that makes it seem perverse of him also to have insisted on stating his view of the higher Christian life in terms of being perfect and not sinning.Unrealistic Theological Rationale:Wesley at least saw the experience of perfection uprooting and eradicating sinful desire from the heart. His understanding saw this not only as a change in the moral nature but as effecting some kind of a physical change as well. (see Packer 140-141) This thread of Wesley’s teaching has been picked up by such groups as the church of the Nazarene in its teaching of the eradication of the sin nature.Spiritual Elitism:The injection of a second work of grace into the Christian life also leads to a spiritual elitism on the part of those who have attained this “higher life.” There is a subtle tendency to look down patronizingly upon those who have not had this experience. (One of my former students at Simpson recently told me he was going to write an article entitled, “my life as a second class Christian”!)Dangers of Legalism:Particularly in the holiness groups, the Wesleyan concept of perfection as perfect love was exchanged for what Wesley called “high-strained” perfectionism which seeks the absolute perfection of God. To achieve this high standard, sin was redefined in terms of external acts and equated with cultural norms e.g. smoking, drinking, dancing, hair length, makeup, movies. Richard Lovelace speaks eloquently to this problem. . “. .. the conscience cannot accept sanctification unless it is based in a foundation in justification. When this is attempted the resulting insecurity creates a luxuriant overgrowth of religious flesh as believers seek to build a holiness formidable enough to pacify their consciences and quiet their sense of alienation from God. (The Dynamics of Spiritual Life, 104,) “The fully enlightened conscience cannot be pacified by any amount of grace inherent in our lives, since that always falls short of the perfection demanded by God’s law. . . such a conscience is forced to draw back into the relative darkness of self-deception. Either it manufactures a fictitious righteousness in heroic works of ascetic piety, or it redefines sin in shallow terms so that it can lose the consciousness of its presence.” (99)Problems With Exegesis:Wesley’s Scriptural proof of his doctrine (see above) consist of either promises and calls to holiness (with affirmations that God will indeed finally deliver his people from sin) or they are statements of accomplished deliverance which the believer possesses now. “Wesley affirms that the promises find fulfillment in total and absolute terms in this life and appeals to declarations, along with the prayers and commands, to buttress his conclusions.” (Packer, 139). In short he falls victim to a totally realized eschatology rather than seeing the tension of an “already but not yet” with reference to the Christian life.Protestations notwithstanding . . .Wesley in his own life did not rely upon justification for his acceptance before God. He looked to his state of Sanctification and there found that he was less than perfect. This caused him doubt of his salvation.On October 14, 1738 he wrote, “I cannot find in myself the love of God, or of Christ. Hence my deadness and wanderings in public prayer...Again: I find I have not that joy in the Holy Ghost.”On January 4, 1739 he wrote, “My friends affirm I am mad, because I said I was not a Christian a year ago. I affirm I am not a Christian now. Indeed, what I might have been I know not....Though I have constantly used all means of grace for twenty years, I am not a Christian.”On June 27, 1766 he wrote to Charles Wesley, “. . . and yet (this is the mystery) I do not love God. I never did. Therefore I never believed in the Christian sense of the word. Therefore I am only an honest heathen.”Comment by P.T. Forsythe :“It is a fatal mistake to think of holiness as a possession we have distinct from our faith and conferred upon it. That is a Catholic idea, still saturating Protestant Pietism. (see also Dieter, 14.)III. KeswickWith Keswick one finds a different situation than with the Holiness Movement. Whereas Wesleyan holiness theology is traceable directly to Wesley and has clearly identifiable tenets, Keswick is much more amorphous and comes in many varieties from the strict Keswick of a Major Ian Thomas, John Hunter, Alan Redpath and the Torchbearers fellowship to the milder Keswick of Campus Crusade For Christ and Moody Bible Institute and other respected Evangelical educational institutions. Whereas Holiness theology has tended to dominate in Arminian circles, Keswick has tended to dominate American Evangelicalism of a more Calvinistic bent. Indeed Packer asserts that it has become standard in virtually all of Evangelicalism except confessional Reformed and Lutheran.(151)A. Keswick OriginsIdeological roots: Holiness TheologyCharles Finney & Oberlin TheologyPhobe Palmer & Entire DevotionWilliam Boardman & The Higher Christian LifeHannah Whitehall Smith & The Christian Secret of a Happy LifeHistoric Origins:The term Keswick derives its name from a small community in the Lake district of England. In the wake of the Moody-Sankey campaigns there was an increased thirst for personal holiness and spiritual victory in the lives of many English Evangelicals. T. D. Harford-Battersby, vicar of Keswick was such a man. He had attended the Oxford meetings led by Robert Pearsall Smith and William Boardman 1874. (Bible.org) ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 63 pages 
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In A Small Voice, Guggenbuhl, Gaile
14 Guggenbuhl, Gaile In A Small Voice
La Porte, Indiana Dierkes Press, La Porte IN 1971 First Edition Hardcover Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed. Aqua cover with brown dust covered with mylar protective cover. Inscribed " For Helen Noah, our longtime Banking Friend- May you find these poems heart warming and ispiring. Gaile Guggenbuhl, Jan 1972. Darkness to inside gutter area looks like glue turning dark. Contents and cover not affected. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Author Signed; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 12.90 USD
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The Jazz Bird  (Author Signed), Holden, Craig
15 Holden, Craig The Jazz Bird (Author Signed)
Simon & Schuster 2001 0743212967 / 9780743212960 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. An exquisitely written novel of love and betrayal, of money and power, set at the apex of that time of glitz and innocence known as the Jazz Age. CINCINNATI, 1927... Lawyer George Remus became the country's biggest bootlegger, grossing over $80 million until his arrest. Upon his release from prison, he learns that his beautiful wife, Imogene, has left him and that his bank accounts are empty. On the morning of their divorce, he runs her car off the road in the middle of rush hour in Eden Park and shoots her to death. Shocked and fascinated by this horrible crime, the country gears up for a sensational trial pitting the man known as "the king of the bootleggers" against Chief Prosecutor Charlie Taft, the youngest son of the former president. The trial is a national spectacle, a lens focused on the fabulous rise and fall of the Remus empire and the tragic love story within it, and an attempt to answer some tantalizing questions: What actually happened to the fortune? What are the motives of the federal agent who brought Remus down? What complex emotions and desires, leading ultimately to the ruin of three men, really lie within the heart of the woman known as the Jazz Bird? Based on a true story, The Jazz Bird is at once a love story, a crime novel, and the tale of the courtroom battle between two powerful men whose respective futures hang in the balance.; 0.99 x 9.5 x 6.44 Inches; 320 pages; Signed by Author 
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The Last Sanctuary  (Author Signed), Holden, Craig
16 Holden, Craig The Last Sanctuary (Author Signed)
Delacorte Press 1996 0385312091 / 9780385312097 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. From the author whose literary debut, The River Sorrow, was hailed by The New York Times as "a haunting, highly original thriller [with] one powerful surprise after another" comes a riveting new novel that could have come from today's headlines--at once a heart-pounding, chillingly realistic thriller and a dark, complex plunge into the human psyche. Rarely has a first novel received the kind of extraordinary critical acclaim garnered by The River Sorrow, Craig Holden's spellbinding tale of an innocent man accused of murder, caught in a nightmare of terror and survival.With The Last Sanctuary, Holden dazzles us once again with a mesmerizing thriller that introduces another good, ordinary man turned fugitive--this time a Gulf War veteran living on the edge of society, falsely accused of murder and plunged into America's dark underworld of armed militias and terrorist cults, running from the cops, federal agents--and from his own tortured soul. The cat and mouse chase across North America's last wilderness--the soaring mountains and glacier-strewn shores of Alaska--is brilliantly cinematic. The complex relationship between the fugitive, Joe Curtis, and his nemesis, a female Native American ATF agent, is superbly rendered and utterly unpredictable. And the novel, at once nerve-shattering and beautifully written, is as topical as Waco and Oklahoma City--and as universal as our own worst nightmares. ; 1.3 x 9.1 x 4.6 Inches; 370 pages; Signed by Author 
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A Scriptural, Ecclesiastical, and Historical View of Slavery from the Days of The Patriarch Abraham To The Nineteenth Century addressed to the Right Rev. Alonzo Potter, D.D., Hopkins, John Henry
17 Hopkins, John Henry A Scriptural, Ecclesiastical, and Historical View of Slavery from the Days of The Patriarch Abraham To The Nineteenth Century addressed to the Right Rev. Alonzo Potter, D.D.
New York , NY W. I. Pooley & Co. 1864 1st Edition Thus; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Professionally rebound in black cloth with gilt print. Contents are original and look almost new, clean and bright. This is not a recent reprint or print on demand.Reverend Hopkins conviction is captured in his statement , "...while I should rejoice in the adoption of any plan of gradual abolition which could be accepted peacefully by general consent, I cannot see that we have any right to interfere with the domestic institutions of the South, either by law or by the Gospel." "John Henry Hopkins (January 30, 1792 – January 9, 1868) was the first bishop of Episcopal Diocese of Vermont and the eighth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. He was also an artist (both in water-color and in oils), a lawyer, an ironmonger, a musician and composer, a theologian, and an architect, who introduced Gothic architecture into the United States. In 1861, Hopkins wrote his "most controversial" pamphlet, The Bible View of Slavery, in which he criticized abolitionists and declared that no scriptural basis for ending slavery existed. The pamphlet was seen as Hopkins' attempt to justify slavery based on the Bible. He argued that slavery was not a sin per se. A major example of Hopkins coming under fire was the "bitter attack upon him during the War signed by Alonzo Potter, the then Bishop of Pennsylvania, and 163 other clergy of the Diocese of Pennsylvania." In the attack, Hopkins was called "wicked," and his views were called "unworthy of any servant of Jesus Christ." Hopkins' "come back" was an overwhelming citation of Holy Scripture, and of over one hundred historical authorities, ranging from St. Paul to Theodore Parker. Hopkins' "come back" was never answered. Hopkins' "religious awakening" happened during his first winter in the Ligonier Valley. He was alone, reading a work of Hannah More, when as Hopkins described it, "a sudden beam of divine Truth shone into his inmost heart." From that experience on, for the rest of his life, "the love of Christ Crucified" was Hopkins' "guiding and ruling principle". (Wikipedia) In spite of his convictions about slavery he was instrumental in helping the Episcopal Church in the North and South heal after the Civil War. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Rare.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 376 pages 
Price: 149.97 USD
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The Life of William Harvey, Keynes, Geoffrey
18 Keynes, Geoffrey The Life of William Harvey
London Oxford University Press 1966 019858119X / 9780198581192 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Red cloth hardcover. Dust a bit sunfaded and has tear to the fold. Now covered in mylar cover. William Harvey (1 April 1578 – 3 June 1657)[2] was an English physician who made seminal contributions in anatomy and physiology. He was the first known physician to describe completely, and in detail, the systemic circulation and properties of blood being pumped to the brain and body by the heart. Harvey was a prominent sceptic regarding allegations of witchcraft. He was one of the examiners of four women from Lancashire accused of witchcraft in 1634, and as a consequence of his report, all of them were acquitted.[16][17] Earlier, in 1632, while travelling with the King to Newmarket, he had been sent to investigate a woman accused of being a witch. Initially he told her that he was a wizard and had come to discuss the Craft with her, and asked whether she had a familiar. She put down a saucer of milk and called to a toad which came out and drank the milk. He then sent her out to fetch some ale, and killed the toad and dissected it, concluding that it was a perfectly ordinary animal and not supernatural in any way. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 502 pages 
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Fatal February  (Author Signed), Levenson, Barbara
19 Levenson, Barbara Fatal February (Author Signed)
Oceanview Publishing 2009 193351552X / 9781933515526 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Looks new. Signed by Author on Title Page. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. For half Jewish, half Southern Baptist Miami criminal defense attorney Mary Magruder Katz, life starts to spin completely out of control when a minor fender bender turns out to be an unlikely shot from Cupid's bow.The other car's driver, isn't just a distracted driver; he's distracting, not to mention charming, handsome, and mysterious. Hardly before she knows what hit her, Mary breaks off her engagement, jumps into a sizzling new romance, gets fired from her former fiancé's highbrow law firm, starts her own practice, and lands her first client, Lillian Yarmouth.But Lillian isn't just any client; she's the prime suspect in what's become the Miami society murder of the year. While investigating Lillian's alleged crime of passion, Mary finds that this case, like all matters of the heart, is anything but black and white. And Mary has clearly stumbled onto something that has someone seeing red.February may be the shortest month of the year, but Mary's got some long days (and nights) ahead. This month could be a real killer. ; 1.1 x 8.3 x 5.6 Inches; 253 pages; p; Signed by Author 
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A Clean Heart, McLaughlin, G.A.
20 McLaughlin, G.A. A Clean Heart
Chicago, Il The Christian Witness 1901 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 
First edition. A Methodist pastor and evangelist, McLaughlin wrote prolifically, including hundreds of articles as editor for the Christian Witness Company, a post he held 45 years. He also wrote a series of commentaries, and numerous holiness classics, and was pastor of the Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church, Haverhill, Massachusetts. b. 1851, d 1933. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 74 pages; 
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