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The Ghost Mountain Boys  Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for New Guinea--The Forgotten War of the South Pacific, Campbell, James
1 Campbell, James The Ghost Mountain Boys Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for New Guinea--The Forgotten War of the South Pacific
Crown 2007 0307335968 / 9780307335968 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed bookplate and inlaid letter to former owner from author. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. Lying due north of Australia, New Guinea is among the world’s largest islands. In 1942, when World War II exploded onto its shores, it was an inhospitable, cursorily mapped, disease-ridden land of dense jungle, towering mountain peaks, deep valleys, and fetid swamps. Coveted by the Japanese for its strategic position, New Guinea became the site of one of the South Pacific’s most savage campaigns. Despite their lack of jungle training, the 32nd Division’s Ghost Mountain Boys were assigned the most grueling mission of the entire Pacific campaign: to march 130 miles over the rugged Owen Stanley Mountains and to protect the right flank of the Australian army as they fought to push the Japanese back to the village of Buna on New Guinea’s north coast. Comprised of National Guardsmen from Michigan and Wisconsin, reserve officers, and draftees from across the country, the 32nd Division lacked more than training—they were without even the basics necessary for survival. The men were not issued the specialized clothing that later became standard issue for soldiers fighting in the South Pacific; they fought in hastily dyed combat fatigues that bled in the intense humidity and left them with festering sores. They waded through brush and vines without the aid of machetes. They did not have insect repellent. Without waterproof containers, their matches were useless and the quinine and vitamin pills they carried, as well as salt and chlorination tablets, crumbled in their pockets. Exhausted and pushed to the brink of human endurance, the Ghost Mountain Boys fell victim to malnutrition and disease. Forty-two days after they set out, they arrived two miles south of Buna, nearly shattered by the experience. Arrival in Buna provided no respite. The 32nd Division was ordered to launch an immediate assault on the Japanese position. After two months of furious—sometimes hand-to-hand—combat, the decimated division finally achieved victory. The ferocity of the struggle for Buna was summed up in Time magazine on December 28, 1942, three weeks before the Japanese army was defeated: “Nowhere in the world today are American soldiers engaged in fighting so desperate, so merciless, so bitter, or so bloody.”Reminiscent of classics like Band of Brothers and The Things They Carried, this harrowing portrait of a largely overlooked campaign is part war diary, part extreme adventure tale, and (through letters, journals, and interviews) part biography of a group of men who fought to survive in an environment every bit as fierce as the enemy they faced. Rare. ; 1.4 x 9.3 x 6.3 Inches; 400 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 42.97 USD
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The life and conversion of Cornelius Cayley, Cayley, Cornelius
2 Cayley, Cornelius The life and conversion of Cornelius Cayley
Leeds Davies and Booth 1815 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Original 1815 paper edition has been rebound in marble hardcover with red spine and decorative label. Very nice collectible copy. Has an engraving of Cayley opposite Title page. Pages uneven cut . New parchment endpapers and beautifully bound. Very Rare. ; 104 pages 
Price: 149.97 USD
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Where the Swallowtail Kite Soars  The Legacies of Glades County, Florida and The Vanishing Wilderness, Dale, Nancy
3 Dale, Nancy Where the Swallowtail Kite Soars The Legacies of Glades County, Florida and The Vanishing Wilderness
iUniverse, Inc. 2004 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Near Fine with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Bok looks new. Very Rare Author inscribed poem in front along with Authors Signature. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. "May you walk with a gentle breeze upon your face- May you wake to the beauty of a lavender sky- May you sleep under a blanket of stars- In Florida Last pristine wilderness- Nancy Dale. Looks new. Palmdale, a remote town in Glades County, population less than 1,000, is on the curb of creeping urbanization. Today, more people than Palmdale's entire population are moving into Florida each day. The pioneer culture and Florida's last wilderness is threatened by growth that exploits "blue gold" water and the land. The sprawling ranches set amidst tall cabbage palm prairies are disappearing. The cost to stay is more than the price to sell with high inheritance taxes and the evaporation of a cattle based economy. The early pioneers forecasted Florida's future in their own lifetime as they struggled to hold onto a way of life in a place where few chose to carve a living.

Their stories predict the high premium of development: light pollution, traffic, sewage, crime and the "napalming" of native trees replaced by "ornamental" shrubs, cement, and gated communities. They foresaw the destruction of natural eco-systems, water shortages and communities where wildlife extermination businesses spring up to destroy "pesky" intruders such as squirrels, woodpeckers, snakes and other Everglades species.

The story of Palmdale, Florida, and its people reflects a proud cultural heritage living on the edge of civilization. Palmdale is a ghost town today with only a few ranches left and the Seminole Indian Tribe living off a small market economy against the odds of metropolitan growth, dollars and political power.This story reflects a tragic national trend threatening the survival of rural America. ; 0.5 x 8.8 x 6 Inches; 180 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 19.19 USD

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Keswickism, Godbey, W.B.
4 Godbey, W.B. Keswickism
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Booklet's cover is detached and has chips. Contents complete. Rare work by Godbey on Keswickism. Rare if not unique. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life.II. Wesley and WesleyanismA. Wesley & SanctificationIn the theology of John Wesley one finds a new direction, distinct both from Reformed and classic Arminianism Wesley built his understanding of the nature of man solidly upon the Reformed position of original sin, and the subsequent necessity of divine grace for salvation. Here however he parted company with the reformers and injected the doctrine of prevenient grace, (all men have received of the Holy Spirit the ability to respond to God) into his understanding of the doctrine of salvation. Wesley rejected the Reformed concept of election , opting instead for the Arminian concept of conditional election. Thus he joined the Reformed doctrine of the total sinfulness of the individual and the primacy of grace with the Arminian stress on human freedom, with its subsequent moral obligations. But his doctrine of Sanctification was not traditional Arminianism Wesley was also heavily influenced by the mystics. Packer has observed that he superimposed“on the Augustinianism of the Anglican prayer book and the heaven aspiring High Church moralist in which he was reared a concept of perfection . . . that he had learned from the Greek Patristic sources. “Macarius the Egyptian” . . . and Ephraem Syrus were chief among these. There idea of perfection was not of sinlessness, but of an ever deepening process of all around moral change. To this idea Wesley then added the lesson he had learned form those whom he called the “mystic writers” (a category including the Anglican William Law, the Roman Catholics Molinos, Fenelon, Gaston de Renty, Francis de Sales, and Madame Guyon, the Lutheran Pietist Francke, and the pre-reformation Theologia Gremanica) The lesson was that the heart of true godliness is a motivating spirit of love to God and man; without this all religion is hollow and empty. (Keep In Step with the Spirit,134)Wesley asserted the primacy of justification, and the assurance the believer could have based upon the righteousness of Christ. However, his Arminian view of election creeps into his view of final salvation. He views the process of Sanctification as one of making the individual worthy of salvation. This process is a work of God, but it is also a work of man. At this point a synergism appears. At one point he explicitly states that good works are a condition of final justification which he regards as necessary for final salvation (Lindstrom, 207)B. Developments within WesleyanismAs Wesleyanism took root in America, it was institutionalized in the context of the circuit rider and revivalism. This had profound results on the form of the teaching. As early as 1784 Francis Asbury advocated preaching the experience of entire sanctification as one which believers should expect immediately by faith. Revivalism emphasized definable turning points in a Christian’s life as essential. Holiness preaching tended to center around Wesley’s sanctification teaching of a second crisis experience subsequent to justification which was commonly termed entire sanctification. From this followed it followed that it was the duty of those who had experienced entire sanctification to confess it and seek to bring others into this experience.As Methodism became respectable, there was a call for a return to the pure doctrine of Wesley. In the latter part of the nineteenth century the National holiness Association was born to promote Wesleyan-holiness theology. Three names are prominent in the promulgation of holiness theology: Phobe Palmer; William Boardman; and Hannah Whitehall Smith.Phobe Palmer’s emphasis becomes key here. Although she says nothing that Wesley did not say a century before, she changes the Wesleyan emphasis subtly, and injects presuppositions foreign to Wesley. Whereas with Wesley the experience of perfection was something to be sought, for Palmer it was vital for continuance of salvation. For Palmer the crisis was vital. Perfection was the beginning of the Christian life and growth in holiness and the focal point of the Christian life. The focus of sanctification tended to be wholly upon a single point of wholehearted commitment, and divorced from any gradual process. “Thus, the moment of death to self and birth to love readily became an end in itself--a goal rather than an essential element in the establishment of a new relationship of freedom and love in the hearts of believers as the Holy Spirit led them from grace to grace in the will of God. (Dieter, 41)C. Key PropositionsSecond Work Of Grace.For the holiness proponents particularly the second work of grace became vital for retaining one’s salvation. Palmer particularly sees justification as dependent upon the believer’s faithfulness. she states:“As I ascended the heavenly way, clearer light shone upon my mind, revealing higher duties, requiring more of the spirit of sacrifice, and furnishing yet stronger tests of obedience. but with increasing light, increasing strength was given, enabling me to be answerable to these higher duties: for I had not learned how to retain justification while under condemnation at the same time for neglecting known duties.”For Palmer the solution lay in sanctification, envisioned as a post conversion crisis. She termed this a crisis because for her the issue was the retention or loss of justification. again she states:“I saw I could not; I must either make the necessary sacrifices, or I must sin, and by my sin forfeit my state of justification. And here my justification would have ended with me had I refused to be holy.”Thus, the second work of grace is really the basis of one’s continuance in salvation.The means of achieving this second work of grace is conceived of as an act of faith akin to the act of faith involved in justification. William Boardman notes:“Whether the question relates to justification or sanctification, the answer is the same. The way of freedom from sin is the same as the way of freedom from condemnation. . . faith in the purifying presence of Jesus.” (Higher Christian Life, 81)This same mentality persists to this day. in the Spring of 1986 I attended a Sanctification Conference sponsored by the C&MA in Piedmont CA. The keynote speaker, the president of the denomination began his first sermon with the words, “There are two gospels, the gospel of justification is for the sinner, the gospel of sanctification for the saint.” Justification is seen as delivering from the penalty of sin, sanctification is seen to deliver from the power of sin.For Boardman, this work of grace is a mystical inauguration into a process:“In the one, atonement has been made, and the moment it is accepted, pardon is complete; in the other, although the righteousness of Christ is perfect in which the soul is to be clothed, yet the work of unfolding . . . is a work of time and progress.” (40)Hannah Whitehall Smith propounds the basic teaching of holiness theology by bifurcating justification and sanctification. Her contribution, no doubt reflecting her Quaker background was the injection of a quietism into the process. She envisions the process as an entire surrender to the Lord, and a perfect trust in Him. She envisions three steps to the process:(1) The Christian must realize the gift of God.“In order therefore to enter into a practical experience of this interior life, the soul must be in a receptive attitude, fully recognizing that it is God’s gift in Christ Jesus.” (The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life, 47)(2) Consecration is necessary.She states that the soul must be abandoned to God and lie passive in His hands (47) “To some minds the word ‘abandonment might express this idea better than the word consecration. But whatever word we use, we mean an entire surrender of the whole being to God--spirit soul and body placed under his absolute control, for Him to do with us as He pleases.”(3) Faith then follows surrender.“Love may be lavished upon us by another without stint or measure, but until we believe we are that we are loved, it never really becomes ours.” (51) She concludes: “In order to enter into this blessed interior life of rest and triumph, you have to take two steps--first entire abandonment; and second absolute faith. (52-54)While, holiness theologies come in many varieties and with various emphases, they all make the crucial disjuncture between justification, appropriated by faith and securing pardon form sin and sanctification/crisis/second work of grace/baptism by the spirit as a post conversion faith experience which breaks the power of sin.Sinlessness:In Wesley’s mind sin was primarily voluntary and was thus intimately bound up with the will. In a sermon on 1 John 3:9 speaking of the privilege of sinlessness he defined sin in a wholly voluntary manner.By sin I here understand outward sin, according to the plain common acceptation [sic] of the word; an actual, voluntary, transgression of the law of God; and of any commandment of God, acknowledged to be such, at the time it is transgressed.Elsewhere speaking of the nature of sin he declared:Not only sin, properly so called, (that is, a voluntary transgression of a known law) but sin, improperly so called, (that is an involuntary transgression of a divine law, known or unknown) needs the atoning blood.I believe there is no such perfection in this life as excludes these involuntary transgressions which I apprehend to be naturally consequent on the ignorance and mistakes inseparable from mortality.Therefore sinless perfection is a phrase I never use, lest I should seem to contradict myself.I believe a person filled with the love of God is still liable to these involuntary transgressions.Such transgressions you may call sin, if you please: I do not, for the reasons above-mentioned. (Works: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 19 (XI, 396)Wesley’s hamartiology “emphasized the willful or spiritual dimensions of sin more than the outward (moral) or cognitive (theoretical knowledge) aspects of it. Sinlessness in this context was more a matter of willing God’s will than replicating God’s perfect knowledge, action, or holiness; sin was more a matter of knowledgeable and willful rebellion against God’s will than a failure or lack of conformity to the glory of God.” (John Tyson, Charles Wesley on Sanctification (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1986) 257.)Christian Perfection:John Wesley saw Christian perfection which was available to all believers in this life as a gift from God and to be accomplished in a moment in time Christian Perfection is that love of God and our neighbor, which implies deliverance from all sin. That this is received merely by faith That it is given instantaneously, in one moment. That we are to expect it, not at death, but at any moment; that is, now is the accepted time, now is the day of this salvationJohn Wesley was adamant about the instantaneous nature of this perfection/sanctification. His brother Charles however more and more brought the process to the forefront as the years progressed.Wesley himself drew up a list of ten propositions concerning perfection which teach a progress-crisis-progress as a model for Christian perfection. In these propositions it can clearly be seen that Wesley does not understand the term teleios in the sense of mature (BAG,187) but rather in the sense of his own definition of sinlessness. There is such a thing as perfection: for it is again and again mentioned in Scripture. It is not so early as justification: for justified persons are to “go on to maturity.” (Heb. 6:1) It is not so late as death; for St. Paul speaks of living men that were perfect (Phil. 3:15) It is not absolute. Absolute perfection belongs not to man, nor to angels, but to God alone. It does not make a man infallible: None is infallible, while he remains in the body. It is sinless? It is not worthwhile to contend for a term. It is ‘salvation from sin.’ It is ‘perfect love.’ (I John 4:18) This is the essence of it; its properties, or inseparable fruits, are, rejoicing evermore, praying without ceasing, and in everything giving thanks. (I Thess. 5:16, etc.) It is improvable. It is so far from lying in an indivisible point, from being incapable of increase, that one perfected in love may grow in grace far swifter than he did before. It is amissible, capable of being lost; of which we have numerous instances. But we were not thoroughly convinced of this, till five or six years ago. It is constantly both preceded and followed by a gradual work.” (WORKS: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 25 (XI, 441-42)).As can be seen from the above quoted propositions, for Wesley perfection was not the equivalent of maturity, but it was to be equated with sinlessness (i.e. voluntary transgression), or love. He explained perfection elsewhere as “perfect love.” “I want you to be all love. This is the perfection I believe and teach.” He was careful not to set perfection too high, recognizing the dangers of “high-strained perfection” which he said led to a thousand nervous disorders. Such high-strained perfection (“so high as no man we have ever heard or read of attained [it]”) would have the unexpected result of driving Christian perfection out of the world.Entire Sanctification:This is “a personal, definitive work of God’s sanctifying grace by which the war within oneself might cease and the heart be fully released from rebellion into wholehearted love for God and others.” (Dieter, 17) This experience has negative and positive benefits. Negatively, it is seen as a cleansing of the heart, which heals the remaining systemic damage from Adam’s transgression. Positively, it, it is a freedom, “a turning of the whole heart toward God in love to seek and to know His will, which becomes the soul’s delight.” (Dieter, 18) Wesley listed the benefits of this sanctification: To love God with all one’s heart and one’s neighbor as oneself; To have the mind that is in Christ; To bear the fruit of the Spirit (in accordance with Gal. 5); The restoration of the image of God in the soul, a recovery of man to the moral image of God, which consists of righteousness and true holiness”; 5.Inward and outward righteousness, “holiness of life issuing from the heart”; God’s sanctifying of the person in spirit, soul and body; The person’s own perfect consecration to God; A continuous presentation through Jesus of the individual’s thoughts, words and actions as a sacrifice to God of praise and thanksgiving; Salvation from all sin. (Wesley, sermon “On Perfection”, Works 6, 413-15.)D. Scriptural SupportWesleyans claim that they approach Scripture holistically and do not rely on proof-texts for their doctrine, and that the holistic teaching of Scripture, its warp and woof, supports their doctrine of Sanctification. Nevertheless there are several passages which form the matrix of their understanding of the nature of sanctification. These include:Deut. 30:6Ezekiel 35:-26, 29Matt. 5:8, 48; 6;10Rom 2:29Rom 12:1-2 Therefore I urge you brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship.Phoebe Palmer a leader in the revival of Wesleyanism in the late 19th century gives a typical holiness exposition of this passage, placing it in the context of the altar of Exodus 29:37. According to Palmer, Christ is the believers altar. Since according to Exodus everything that touched the altar is holy, every Christian who was willing by faith to present himself without reservation as a living sacrifice upon the altar of the finished work of Christ would be entirely sanctified and cleansed from all sin. (Dieter, 39)2 Cor 3:17-18; 7:1Gal 2:20Ephesians 3:14-29; 5:27Phil 3:151 Thess. 5:23Titus 2:11-14;Heb. 6:1; 7:25; 10:14John 8:34-36;John 17:20-23:Commenting on the John 17 passage, Mildred Wynkoop has noted parallels with Ephesians 4:Jesus had in mind a spiritually unified body of believersThat would bring glory to Himself.He died to sanctify them. Al other elements of redemption were included but incidental to this.Sanctification was in word and in truth. This “word” obviously not the Scripture primarily, but was found in living fellowship with the living Word, who is himself Truth.The commission was accompanied by a moral fitness--for the unity of the spirit indicated in both passages is moral clear through.(Wynkoop Theology of Love, 320, cited by Dieter, 32)1 John 1:51 John 7-91 John 2:61 John 3:31 John 3:8-10In commenting on this passage Wesley based his whole thesis upon his definition if sin as voluntary transgression. (see above), James 1:4E. CritiqueRedefinition Of Terminology:The Reformed have for centuries taken Wesley to task for teaching sinless perfection. While this charge is not really accurate, for the reasons shown above, Wesley himself must bear the blame for this charge because of his own redefinition of terms. Packer notes:It was indeed confusing for Wesley to give the name perfection to a state which from many standpoints was one of continued imperfection. It was yet more confusing that he should define sin “properly so called”, subjectively, as “voluntary transgression of a known law,” rather than objectively, as failure, whether conscious or unconscious, voluntary or involuntary, to conform to God’s revealed standards. It was supremely confusing when he let himself speak of sanctified persons as being without sin ( because they were not consciously breaking any known law) while at the same time affirming that they need the blood of Christ every moment to cover their actual shortcomings. Wesley himself insisted that by the objective standard of God’s “perfect law,” every sanctified sinner needs pardon every day; that makes it seem perverse of him also to have insisted on stating his view of the higher Christian life in terms of being perfect and not sinning.Unrealistic Theological Rationale:Wesley at least saw the experience of perfection uprooting and eradicating sinful desire from the heart. His understanding saw this not only as a change in the moral nature but as effecting some kind of a physical change as well. (see Packer 140-141) This thread of Wesley’s teaching has been picked up by such groups as the church of the Nazarene in its teaching of the eradication of the sin nature.Spiritual Elitism:The injection of a second work of grace into the Christian life also leads to a spiritual elitism on the part of those who have attained this “higher life.” There is a subtle tendency to look down patronizingly upon those who have not had this experience. (One of my former students at Simpson recently told me he was going to write an article entitled, “my life as a second class Christian”!)Dangers of Legalism:Particularly in the holiness groups, the Wesleyan concept of perfection as perfect love was exchanged for what Wesley called “high-strained” perfectionism which seeks the absolute perfection of God. To achieve this high standard, sin was redefined in terms of external acts and equated with cultural norms e.g. smoking, drinking, dancing, hair length, makeup, movies. Richard Lovelace speaks eloquently to this problem. . “. .. the conscience cannot accept sanctification unless it is based in a foundation in justification. When this is attempted the resulting insecurity creates a luxuriant overgrowth of religious flesh as believers seek to build a holiness formidable enough to pacify their consciences and quiet their sense of alienation from God. (The Dynamics of Spiritual Life, 104,) “The fully enlightened conscience cannot be pacified by any amount of grace inherent in our lives, since that always falls short of the perfection demanded by God’s law. . . such a conscience is forced to draw back into the relative darkness of self-deception. Either it manufactures a fictitious righteousness in heroic works of ascetic piety, or it redefines sin in shallow terms so that it can lose the consciousness of its presence.” (99)Problems With Exegesis:Wesley’s Scriptural proof of his doctrine (see above) consist of either promises and calls to holiness (with affirmations that God will indeed finally deliver his people from sin) or they are statements of accomplished deliverance which the believer possesses now. “Wesley affirms that the promises find fulfillment in total and absolute terms in this life and appeals to declarations, along with the prayers and commands, to buttress his conclusions.” (Packer, 139). In short he falls victim to a totally realized eschatology rather than seeing the tension of an “already but not yet” with reference to the Christian life.Protestations notwithstanding . . .Wesley in his own life did not rely upon justification for his acceptance before God. He looked to his state of Sanctification and there found that he was less than perfect. This caused him doubt of his salvation.On October 14, 1738 he wrote, “I cannot find in myself the love of God, or of Christ. Hence my deadness and wanderings in public prayer...Again: I find I have not that joy in the Holy Ghost.”On January 4, 1739 he wrote, “My friends affirm I am mad, because I said I was not a Christian a year ago. I affirm I am not a Christian now. Indeed, what I might have been I know not....Though I have constantly used all means of grace for twenty years, I am not a Christian.”On June 27, 1766 he wrote to Charles Wesley, “. . . and yet (this is the mystery) I do not love God. I never did. Therefore I never believed in the Christian sense of the word. Therefore I am only an honest heathen.”Comment by P.T. Forsythe :“It is a fatal mistake to think of holiness as a possession we have distinct from our faith and conferred upon it. That is a Catholic idea, still saturating Protestant Pietism. (see also Dieter, 14.)III. KeswickWith Keswick one finds a different situation than with the Holiness Movement. Whereas Wesleyan holiness theology is traceable directly to Wesley and has clearly identifiable tenets, Keswick is much more amorphous and comes in many varieties from the strict Keswick of a Major Ian Thomas, John Hunter, Alan Redpath and the Torchbearers fellowship to the milder Keswick of Campus Crusade For Christ and Moody Bible Institute and other respected Evangelical educational institutions. Whereas Holiness theology has tended to dominate in Arminian circles, Keswick has tended to dominate American Evangelicalism of a more Calvinistic bent. Indeed Packer asserts that it has become standard in virtually all of Evangelicalism except confessional Reformed and Lutheran.(151)A. Keswick OriginsIdeological roots: Holiness TheologyCharles Finney & Oberlin TheologyPhobe Palmer & Entire DevotionWilliam Boardman & The Higher Christian LifeHannah Whitehall Smith & The Christian Secret of a Happy LifeHistoric Origins:The term Keswick derives its name from a small community in the Lake district of England. In the wake of the Moody-Sankey campaigns there was an increased thirst for personal holiness and spiritual victory in the lives of many English Evangelicals. T. D. Harford-Battersby, vicar of Keswick was such a man. He had attended the Oxford meetings led by Robert Pearsall Smith and William Boardman 1874. (Bible.org) ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 63 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
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The Red Runners A sequel to The Cazanova Treasure (Author Signed), Hawkins, Seckatary
5 Hawkins, Seckatary The Red Runners A sequel to The Cazanova Treasure (Author Signed)
Cincinnati Robert F. Schulkers 1926 Later Printing; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Poor dust jacket Illustrated by Carll B Williams Signed by Author
Published by Author. Inscribed With all good wishes, signed Seckatary Hawkins. Dust has staining and chips, now in mylar dust cover. Book in very good condition with minor edge wear an stored in an archival slipcase. Very Rare inscribed copy. Seckatary Hawkins is the fictional lead character of a series of children's novels authored by Robert F. Schulkers. The eleven novels were first published between 1921 and 1932, although many appeared first in serialized form in The Cincinnati Enquirer and hundreds of other newspapers around the country. The eleven novels are Stoner's Boy, Seckatary Hawkins in Cuba, The Red Runners, The Gray Ghost, Stormie the Dog Stealer, Knights of the Square Table, Ching Toy, The Chinese Coin, The Yellow Y, Herman the Fiddler, and The Ghost of Lake Tapaho.Schulkers further popularized the series through a nationally syndicated NBC radio broadcast from Chicago and an extensive number of Seckatary Hawkins clubs in larger metropolitan areas. The official club name was "The Fair and Square Club". The club slogan was "A quitter never wins and a winner never quits". Except for Seckatary Hawkins in Cuba and The Ghost of Lake Tapaho, the setting was a river bank that was a composite based on Schulker's familiarity with segments of the Ohio River, the Licking River, and the Kentucky River. Seckatary Hawkins, a fat boy with a cowlick, recorded daily minutes of the adventures of a remarkably organized group of boys. The group of ten or so boys (some boys rotated in and out of the club) had their own club house on the river bank, complete with a stove for heat, a telephone, and even an organ for the required singing practice. Their enemies were formidable. Some had rifles, drove cars, and most were guilty of a number of felonious acts.While never the president of the club, Seckatary Hawkins was clearly the smartest member and the leader. He was regularly called upon by the books' few adult characters and many of the youthful ones to solve various mysteries and to keep the river bank safe. Most of their enemies in the end went home to their mothers or ended up in the school for bad boys. A few reformed during death scenes.Seckatary Hawkins has a small cadre of loyal followers still today who have, under the guidance of one of the author's grandsons, re-established a "Fair and Square" club.The author's books have always enjoyed an enthusiastic readership, the most notable Harper Lee, who mentions two of them in her classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Extremely rare. ; Illustrations; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 336 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 299.97 USD
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Virginia Ghosts, Lee, Marguerite Du Pont
6 Lee, Marguerite Du Pont Virginia Ghosts
Berryville, VA Virginia Book Company 1966 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
photos All Virginia and West Virginia Ghost are combined in this volume with non- Virginia ghost excluded. ; B & W illustrations; 
Price: 14.97 USD
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7 Lowrey, Rev. Asbury, D.D. Possibilities of Grace
Chicago, Ill The Christian Witness Co. 1884 1st Thus; First Impression Hardcover Good+ with no dust jacket 
Red cover. Several written notations inside the front and back cover. Also writing in margins and some very minor underlining. These written notes appear to be sermon notes on Holiness for a sermon by William Cole (perhaps a Methodist preacher?) . Great points! Former owners name William Cole and date of 1946 written in front above notes in same handwriting. Spine and title on front have been varnished for preservation. Spine has the number 2318 faintly written at bottom. Edges of book have slight wear. There is no foxing to pages and paper is not brittle. The overall condition of book is very good except for the above noted minor issues. Binding tight. Engraving of Lowrey opposite of title page. Introduction has "Holiness, History of the Doctrine, The New Testament, Eclipse of Holiness, Fanatics, Asceticism, Mysticism, Reformation, Holiness under Wesley and Others. The remaining contents has sections such as The Trend of Redemption, Emblems of Sanctification, Antecedents of Entire Sanctification, Holiness Defined, Positive Holiness, How to Obtain Holiness, Practical Holiness. This is an extensive work. Lowrey addresses the questions like: Is it possible for man to be saved from all sin before death? What measure of Divine enduement for effective service comes within the scope of Christian privilege and duty? What kind and degree of power shall we receive after that the Holy Ghost is come upon us? Can a man live an unsinning life? Rare. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition.; Engraving of Author in front; 12mo; 472 pages 
Price: 99.97 USD
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Going Home, Roche, George C. &  Andrew Lytle
8 Roche, George C. & Andrew Lytle Going Home
Ottawa, IL Jameson Books Inc. 1955 0915463342 / 9780915463343 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
A historically written novel about mining in Colorado. Foward by Andrew Lytle. Inscribed and signed by author. Illustrated endpapers. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. The author George Charles Roche III (May 16, 1935 – May 5, 2006) was the 11th president of Hillsdale College, serving from 1971 to 1999. He was led to resign following a scandal surrounding an alleged sexual affair between Roche and his daughter-in-law, Lissa Jackson Roche, and her subsequent suicide. Roche authored many books, such as Legacy of Freedom, The Bewildered Society, and The Book of Heroes, although it is believed that Lissa Roche, his daughter-in-law who worked at the college, was the ghost writer for his later books. (Wikipedia) Rare signed copy. ; Ilustrations; 8.30 X 5.80 X 0.90 inches; 182 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 29.97 USD
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Ghost Towns of Arizona, Sherman, James E. & Barbara H. Sherman
9 Sherman, James E. & Barbara H. Sherman Ghost Towns of Arizona
University of Oklahoma Press 1970 First Edition; Second Printing Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by Don Percious 
Black cover with gold print. Dust jacket has chips, but now in Brodart mylar protective cover. Fully Indexed. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Photographs, Maps, & Illustrations 
Price: 18.97 USD
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10 Stafford, T. P A study of the Holy Spirit
Philadelphia PA Judson Press 1920 First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Grey cover. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. ; 143 pages 
Price: 41.91 USD
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Swimmers in the Sea  (Author Signed), Strickland, Denzil
11 Strickland, Denzil Swimmers in the Sea (Author Signed)
Press 53 2008 0981628028 / 9780981628028 First Edition; 1st Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed and signed by author on title page. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. Swimmers in the Sea is a fiercely imagined novel by a newcomer to be watched. Author Denzil Strickland takes calamity and unflinchingly peels back its layers in this thrilling literary debut about a man who travels to pre-Katrina New Orleans to receive an unlikely inheritance from his estranged and dying father, a one-armed portrait artist convicted of manslaughter for the accident that killed his own two children and a newlywed couple leaving their wedding. At the age of thirty, Cliff Ebbets is broke and living in North Carolina, his marriage failing, when he receives a call from a man named Don Willis, his father's live-in companion. Don beckons Cliff to New Orleans for an inheritance he won't specify. Desperate but circumspect about anything to do with his father, Cliff concedes and travels back to the home of his earliest memory. There, he meets his father's friends, men from the underbelly of New Orleans' Ninth Ward, who paint a picture of Cecil Ebbets that Cliff doesn't recognize. It's the same picture he's being shown by the ghost of his dead sister Rachel. The twist in this tale of love and betrayal comes at the outset and wrings back and forth on itself throughout its telling. Swimmers in the Sea is a story about the other family and the son who inherits the sins of his father. It's the story of how the story of your life can change. Just like that. ; 1.2 x 8.6 x 6.2 Inches; 316 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 19.97 USD
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12 Townsend, L.T. The Supernatural Factor in Religious Revivals
Boston, MA Lee and Shepard 1877 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Green cover with gold lettering. Cover shows wear and fading. Contents clean. Author also wrote Credo, Lost Forever, God-man, The arena and the throne, and others. Contains surveys of famous revivals in history, individual experiences, Evangelist and revival agencies such as moody and sankey, women evangelist. Has a section on The Holy Ghost: His work beyond the limits of Christendom. Rare. 
Price: 116.97 USD
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