ABookLegacy    

 Hard to Find and Rare Books

 Americana, Local History, Genealogy, Religion, Military

 Author Signed, First Editions, and others! 

Quick Search

Title
Author
Description
Keyword
Book Number
Advanced Search
 
 
Our secure web pages are hosted by Chrislands Inc, who use a Thawte SSL Certificate to ensure secure transmission of your information.
Fully Trusted SSL Certificate
 
A Book Legacy

Promote Your Page Too
Sign Up Today for Newsletter and Discounts!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse
 
Browse By Category
African American
Alabama
Alaska
Americana
Archaeology
Arizona
Arkansas
Art
Astronomy
Autobiography
Biography
Books On Books
Business- See Scholarly
California
Canada
Children
Colorado
Comics
Connecticut
Cookbook

View Other Categories
 
 
 

Search

Click on Book Title to view full description

 
A Moral Military, Axinn, Sidney
1 Axinn, Sidney A Moral Military
Temple University Press 1990 0877227802 / 9780877227809 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
; 0.75 x 9.25 x 6.25 Inches; 230 pages; Should a good soldier ever disobey a direct military order? Are there restrictions on how we fight a war? What is meant by 'military honor', and does it really affect the contemporary soldier? Is human dignity possible under battlefield conditions? Sidney Axinn considers these basic ethical questions within the context of the laws of warfare and answers 'yes' to each of these questions. In this study of the conduct of war, he examines actions that are honorable or dishonorable and provides the first full-length treatment of the military conventions from a philosophical point of view. Axinn gives a philosophical analysis of the 'Laws of Warfare' as found in the Hague and Geneva Conventions, which have been agreed to by almost every nation in the world. The aims of his study are to establish a basic twentieth-century framework for moral military action and to assist military personnel in analyzing their won professional ethic.Stating that moral reasoning is required by people in military uniform in a wide variety of situations, the author examines the question of the limits of military obedience. Axinn argues for the seriousness of the concept of military honor but limits honorable military activity by a strict interpretation of the notion of war crime. Major chapters deal with military honor, prisoners of war, spying, war crimes, the dirty-hands theory of command, nuclear weapons, terrorism, and covert operations. This philosophical study of the line between honorable and dishonorable military action cautions that in compliance with the war conventions professional military personnel and knowledgeable civilians must not lose their moral nerve nor abandon honor to satisfy immoral political requests. Author note: Sidney Axinn is Professor of Philosophy at Temple University. 
Price: 6.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Artifice and Indeterminacy  An Anthology of New Poetics, Beach, Christopher
2 Beach, Christopher Artifice and Indeterminacy An Anthology of New Poetics
University Alabama Press 1998 0817309462 / 9780817309466 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 
Looks Never Read! Still in shrink wrap. ; Modern & Contemporary Poetics; 392 pages;

Artifice and Indeterminacy gathers the strongest and most representative writings of the past two decades and shows more clearly than ever before the depth and breadth of  contemporary American poetics. Collectively, these essays break with conventional interpretive frameworks and traditional generic boundaries of poetry to give fresh voice to the  poetics of our time.

Neither dismissive of the aesthetic value(s) of poetry, nor reluctant to articulate the ways in which aesthetic evaluation is complicated by the mediating influences of history, culture, class, gender, race, and academic status, the writers presented in this anthology celebrate the artifice of the poetic text while also accepting as a given the indeterminacy of its inception and reception.
 
Individual pieces range in style and approach from theoretical writings to discussions of individual poets such as Emily Dickinson, Louis Zukofsky, and Bob Kaufman. The authors consider such critical issues as gender and the possibilities of a feminist poetics, the textual politics of race and class, and the broader implications of an avant-garde practice.

CONTENTS / CONTRIBUTORS

 

Section 1: Form/Syntax/Speech

Charles Bernstein

Bob Perelman

Barrett Watten

Michael Davidson

Marjorie Perloff

 

Section 2: Pattern/Experience/Song

David Antin

Leslie Scalapino

Lyn Hejinian

John Taggart

 

Section 3: Institutions and Ideology

James Sherry

Ron Silliman

Steve McCaffery

Hank Lazer

Nathaniel Mackey

Maria Damon

 

Section 4: Poetics and Gender

Rae Armantrout

Rachel Blau DuPlessis

Susan Howe

 
Price: 19.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Chalice to the sky, Billinger, Lois White
3 Billinger, Lois White Chalice to the sky
Philadelphia PA Dorrance 1953 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed on endpaper. Blue cover with gold lettering. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover. Very clean. Signed by author. Rare. ; Contemporary poets of Dorrance series; 24mo 5" - 6" tall; 80 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 24.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Checkmate  (Author Signed), Bodman, Karna Small
4 Bodman, Karna Small Checkmate (Author Signed)
Forge Books 2007 0765315424 / 9780765315427 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by Author. Dr. Cameron Talbot has invented a breakthrough technology to defend against cruise missiles. But she needs support from skeptical company officers, funding from a reluctant Congress, and help from the White House to develop her life-saving project. Lt. Col. Hunt Daniels, detailed from the Pentagon to the White House National Security Council to investigate Dr. Talbots work, sees the potential of the invention. The fact that hes attracted to the brilliant scientist adds one more dimension to his interest in her work. But disaster is brewing overseas as militants in the disputed Kashmir region of India steal a series of missiles from sympathizers in the Pakistani military and launch one against India. At the same time, they send one of their agents to Washington, D.C., to steal Dr. Talbots technology so they can protect themselves when their enemies retaliate. The scientist and the NSC staffer find themselves enmeshed in terrorist plots and political wrangling at the highest levels. With scenes in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Capitol Hill, Georgetown restaurants, and Washington dinner parties, as well as action in Kashmir, New Delhi, and at the Taj Mahal, the tension and intrigue escalate until two nuclear-armed countries stand at the brink of war.; 1.2 x 9.4 x 6.3 Inches; 336 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Men, Monkeys and Missing Links, Brown, Arthur I.
5 Brown, Arthur I. Men, Monkeys and Missing Links
Findlay, OH Fundamental Truth Publishers c1921 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Grey booklet with black print. Very clean. Scarce. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Arthur Brown was a Canadian physician turned Baptist preacher, who began writing on evolutionary themes in the 1920's. This volume is an early critique of some of the 'missing links' in early 20th century human evolutionary thought, which includes some of the 'missing links' that were later proven to be contemporary hoaxes.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 39 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Fat Tuesday  (Author Signed), Brown, Sandra
6 Brown, Sandra Fat Tuesday (Author Signed)
New York Warner Books 1997 0446516325 / 9780446516327 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by author. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. New York Times bestselling author Sandra Brown's latest romantic thriller is set against the lively and decadent backdrop of New Orleans--where, to avenge the acquittal of his partner's murderer, a policeman kidnaps the defense lawyer's wife. Scarce. ; 1.5 x 9.1 x 6.1 Inches; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 15.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
BARBARA BUSH (Author Signed)  A Memoir, Bush, Barbara
7 Bush, Barbara BARBARA BUSH (Author Signed) A Memoir
New York , NY Charles Scribners Sons 1994 0025196359 / 9780025196353 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Violet cover. Dust not price clipped. Original signature on bookplate in addition to machine signature. Very clean almost new condition. Mrs. Bush was an engaging women that through adversity and trial will be remembered for her strength and poise. After her husband (President George H.W. Bush) finished his presidency she became a well known speaker and advoate for literacy. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover. Rare signed copy.; Photos; 1.9 x 9.56 x 6.52 Inches; 512 pages;

Barbara Bush is certainly among the most popular First Ladies ever to live in the White House. Politics aside, people worldwide have come to admire her wit, her candor and compassion, as well as her unswerving devotion to her husband and children.

In her memoir, Mrs. Bush for the first time gives readers a very private look at a life lived in the public eye for more than twenty-five years. She begins with a compelling portrait of her early years, including: growing up in Rye, New York, and meeting George Bush; life as a young bride and mother, moving far away from home to West Texas; and the almost unbearable pain of losing a child.

With contemporary American history as the backdrop, Mrs. Bush remembers the shock of learning that her fiancé has been shot down in the Pacific during World War II; the disbelief when a black friend is refused service in a Southern restaurant in the 1950s; and the fear when she is caught in the middle of a student protest march in the 1960s.

She recounts her years in public life, from first moving to Washington when George Bush was elected to Congress; to her experience living in New York as the wife of the Ambassador to the United Nations and in China as wife of the U.S. envoy. She talks candidly about the ups and downs of three presidential campaigns and describes her role as the wife of the Vice President, culminating in the climactic White House years.

Drawing upon excerpts from her diary, which she has compiled for more than thirty years, Mrs. Bush takes us behind the scenes of the Persian Gulf conflict and the end of the Cold War. She talks about both the Bushes' struggle to overcome Graves' disease and how she faced the controversy that erupted at Wellesley College before her commencement speech.

Through the friendships she developed over the years with world leaders and their spouses, we meet and get to know the Gorbachevs, the Thatchers, the Mitterrands, the Mubaraks, and many others. And she tells us why she threw so much of her energy and compassion behind the important cause of making more Americans literate.

This memoir includes hundreds of the funny, often self-deprecating, and occasionally touching anecdotes for which Mrs. Bush is well known: surprising a rat while swimming in the White House pool; accidentally stomping on Boris Yeltsin's foot under the table during a state dinner; wearing a $29 pair of shoes for her husband's inaugural ball.

She also talks about the disappointments of the 1992 presidential campaign and the joys of rediscovering private life, including driving and cooking again for the first time in twelve years.

This is a warm and funny memoir that will charm Mrs. Bush's millions of admirers and earn her many more.; Signed by Author 
Price: 399.97 USD

Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Jimmy Carter The Virtues of Aging (Author Signed), Carter, Jimmy
8 Carter, Jimmy Jimmy Carter The Virtues of Aging (Author Signed)
New York , NY The Ballantine Publishing Group 1998 0345428269 / 9780345428264 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Buff cover with reddish brown spine and gold print. Dust jacket in mylar (clear plastic) cover! Signed by President Carter on title page. Dust jacket not price clipped. Collector's piece! ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 140 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 69.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Old Buzzard Had It Coming  (Author Signed), Casey, Donis
9 Casey, Donis The Old Buzzard Had It Coming (Author Signed)
Scottsdale, AZ Poisoned Pen Press 2005 1590581490 / 9781590581490 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Fine in Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by Author on Title Page. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. One winter evening in 1912, in the woods outside of Boynton, Oklahoma, abusive and drunken Harley Day surprises his son John Lee and the neighbor girl Phoebe Tucker in a lovers' tryst. An hour later, when John Lee walks his beloved home, Phoebe's mother, Alafair Tucker, suspects that something is amiss. How could she know her daughter has been involved in a violent confrontation that will make Phoebe and her beau murder suspects?At supper that evening, over bowls of soupy beans and buttery cornbread, Alafair, her husband Shaw, and their nine lively children, much amused that Phoebe has a boyfriend, discuss the unfortunate Day family. The Days are tormented by their evil father, who beats his wife, mistreats his children, and wastes their money. The mother is helpless, and the eldest daughter, Maggie Ellen, has run away, leaving only 19-year-old John Lee and his 13-year-old sister Naomi to care for the younger children and keep the family from destitution.Then... well, the old buzzard had it coming!This Best Unpublished Mystery of 2004 (The Oklahoma Writers' Federation, Inc.) is the first in a new series. ; An Alafair Tucker Mystery; 0.9 x 8.6 x 5.6 Inches; 226 pages; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 13.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
10 Cawood, Chris; Seale, Gaynell The Spring of '68 (Author Signed)
Magnolia Hill Press 1998 0964223155 / 9780964223158 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Like new. Autographed and numbered copy. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover ; 0.9 x 9.35 x 6.28 Inches; 216 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Narrows  (Author Signed), Connelly, Michael
11 Connelly, Michael The Narrows (Author Signed)
Little, Brown and Company 2004 0316155306 / 9780316155304 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover As New in As New dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed and Signed by Author on Title Page. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. FBI agent Rachel Walling finally gets the call she's dreaded for years.The Poet has returned.Years earlier she worked on the famous case tracking the serial killer who wove lines of poetry into his hideous crimes. Rachel has never forgotten the Poet-and apparently he has not forgotten her. Former LAPD detective Harry Bosch gets a call, too, from an old friend whose husband recently died.The death appeared natural, but this man's ties to the hunt for the Poet make Harry dig deep.What he finds leads him into the most terrifying situation he has ever encountered. So begins the most deeply compelling, frightening, and masterful novel Michael Connelly has ever written, placing Harry Bosch squarely in the path of the most ruthless and ingenious murderer in Los Angeles's history. This spectacularly dramatic and shocking novel will have Michael Connelly's readers desperately hungry for the next book from 'one of America's best writers' (Cleveland Plain Dealer). ; 1.5 x 9 x 6.5 Inches; 416 pages; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 11.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Sharpe's Triumph Richard Sharpe and the BAttle of Assaye, September 1803, Cornwell, Bernard
12 Cornwell, Bernard Sharpe's Triumph Richard Sharpe and the BAttle of Assaye, September 1803
London Harper Collins 1998 0002256304 / 9780002256308 1st UK; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
This is not an exlibrary, does not have price clipped, and is in excellent condition. Very clean contents, probably read only once. Now in mylar archival dust cover to preserve condition. Has slight tilt. With the return of the brave English sergeant Richard Sharpe--here, to battle the mercenary forces of the Mahratta confederation in India in 1803--Bernard Cornwell claims his rightful place alongside Patrick O'Brian as a contemporary master of historical narrative. Sharpe's Triumph is a riveting story of betrayal and revenge that showcases the deft blend of suspenseful military adventure and sweeping historical detail that has made each new installment of the Richard Sharpe series a number one bestseller in Great Britain and around the world. In the four years since he earned his sergeant's stripes at the bloody siege of Seringapatam, young Richard Sharpe has lead a peaceful existence. But this relatively easy life meets with a brutal end when he is the sole survivor of a murderous attack at the hands of Major William Dodd, a cold-blooded English officer who has defected from the East India Company to join the mercenary forces of the Mahratta confederation.Sharpe rises from the killing field at Fort Chasalgaon vowing to avenge his dead comrades, even if it means pursuing the turncoat Dodd to the very ends of the continent. It is a quest that takes him deep into the heart of enemy territory, where the accepted rules of engagement have been discarded, where ever-shifting loyalties create an environment of dangerous uncertainty, forcing Sharpe to guard against attacks from enemy and friend.The paths of treachery ultimately lead to the small village of Assaye, where Sharpe's company joins the army of Sir Arthur Wellesley--the future Duke of Wellington--to take on the Mahratta horde. Outnumbered and outgunned, Wellesley bravely seizes an unexpected geographical advantage and charges into the white heat of a battle that will make his reputation. It is a bloody confrontation that will make Sharpe's name, too--but first he must survive the carnage and live to tell the tale of what will be remembered as one of the greatest battles of its century. May have minor dust spotting on top edge from shelf storage over time otherwise as new condition.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 400 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Last days of Knickerbocker life in New York, Dayton, Abram C
13 Dayton, Abram C Last days of Knickerbocker life in New York
New York , NY G.W. Harlan 1882 First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Green cover with gold print. Wonderfully written about the period of the 1830"s in New York. Book was published after the author's death in 1877 when the manuscript was found in his belongings. It was written during the 1830"s when the author was a contemporary of the period. A lot of references to New York. "Albion, St. Marks, Lafayette, Waverly, Washington and other grand places wee inaugurated through the instrumentality of "wild cat" tenders, and grandfathers simple Knickerbocker home was abandoned for more sumptuous residence in fashionable quarters ." Front hinge starting to crack otherwise fine condition.. Rare. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 275 pages; p 
Price: 39.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Niobara Service Book from the Book of Common Prayer of 1929 / Niobrara Wocekiye Wowapi, Deanery, Niobrara
14 Deanery, Niobrara The Niobara Service Book from the Book of Common Prayer of 1929 / Niobrara Wocekiye Wowapi
South Dakota Niobrara Deanery 1937 Revised Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Black cover with gilt print. Contemporary black cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Niobrara Deanery, South Dakota Obaspe. The Bishop White Prayer Book Society underwrote the publcation of the Niobara Service Book in the Dakota language for use of the Indians in South Dakota. The original translation was done in the late 19th century. Exlibrary from the Diocesan library at Church House Philadelphia when it closed. Rare. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 368 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Two O'Clock, Eastern Wartime  A Novel (Author Signed), Dunning, John
15 Dunning, John Two O'Clock, Eastern Wartime A Novel (Author Signed)
New York Scribner 2001 0743201957 / 9780743201957 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover As New in As New dust jacket Signed by Author
As new condition. Signed on title page with silver ink! "John Dunning, one of the master storytellers of our time, has written a hauntingly evocative tale of suspense. Set during WWII, Two O"Clock, Eastern Wartime transports the reader. The mystery, romance, the music the voices of that era's radio, econ in memory long after the last page is turned." Linda Fairstein, author. This is a collectors grade book! ; 1.58 x 9.46 x 6.31 Inches; 480 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
10-lb. Penalty  (Author Signed), Francis, Dick
16 Francis, Dick 10-lb. Penalty (Author Signed)
Putnam 1997 0399143025 / 9780399143021 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
; 1.4 x 8.9 x 5.9 Inches; 273 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 15.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Flashman And The Angel Of The Lord, Fraser, George Macdonald
17 Fraser, George Macdonald Flashman And The Angel Of The Lord
Knopf 1995 0679441727 / 9780679441724 First American Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
We provide delivery tracking to all US orders. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. ; 8.75 x 1.25 x 6.25 Inches; 394 pages 
Price: 6.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Flashman And The Dragon From the Flashman Papers, 1860, Fraser, George Macdonald
18 Fraser, George Macdonald Flashman And The Dragon From the Flashman Papers, 1860
London, England Collins Harvill 1985 0002712458 / 9780002712453 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Book has a tilt from reading otherwise fine condition. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover. May have dust spotting on top edge from shelf storage over time.; 8.75 x 1.25 x 6.25 Inches; 394 pages 
Price: 14.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The LOVE SONG OF J EDGAR HOOVER, Friedman, Kinky
19 Friedman, Kinky The LOVE SONG OF J EDGAR HOOVER
Simon & Schuster 1996 0684803771 / 9780684803777 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good+ in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Looks new. SIGNED. Nothing is sacred in a Kinky Friedman book. Friedman and his characters will take on any subject and have at it. Therein lies his charm. ; Kinky Friedman Novels; 1 x 9.2 x 6.2 Inches; 240 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 12.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Keswickism, Godbey, W.B.
20 Godbey, W.B. Keswickism
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Booklet's cover is detached and has chips. Contents complete. Rare work by Godbey on Keswickism. Rare if not unique. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life.II. Wesley and WesleyanismA. Wesley & SanctificationIn the theology of John Wesley one finds a new direction, distinct both from Reformed and classic Arminianism Wesley built his understanding of the nature of man solidly upon the Reformed position of original sin, and the subsequent necessity of divine grace for salvation. Here however he parted company with the reformers and injected the doctrine of prevenient grace, (all men have received of the Holy Spirit the ability to respond to God) into his understanding of the doctrine of salvation. Wesley rejected the Reformed concept of election , opting instead for the Arminian concept of conditional election. Thus he joined the Reformed doctrine of the total sinfulness of the individual and the primacy of grace with the Arminian stress on human freedom, with its subsequent moral obligations. But his doctrine of Sanctification was not traditional Arminianism Wesley was also heavily influenced by the mystics. Packer has observed that he superimposed“on the Augustinianism of the Anglican prayer book and the heaven aspiring High Church moralist in which he was reared a concept of perfection . . . that he had learned from the Greek Patristic sources. “Macarius the Egyptian” . . . and Ephraem Syrus were chief among these. There idea of perfection was not of sinlessness, but of an ever deepening process of all around moral change. To this idea Wesley then added the lesson he had learned form those whom he called the “mystic writers” (a category including the Anglican William Law, the Roman Catholics Molinos, Fenelon, Gaston de Renty, Francis de Sales, and Madame Guyon, the Lutheran Pietist Francke, and the pre-reformation Theologia Gremanica) The lesson was that the heart of true godliness is a motivating spirit of love to God and man; without this all religion is hollow and empty. (Keep In Step with the Spirit,134)Wesley asserted the primacy of justification, and the assurance the believer could have based upon the righteousness of Christ. However, his Arminian view of election creeps into his view of final salvation. He views the process of Sanctification as one of making the individual worthy of salvation. This process is a work of God, but it is also a work of man. At this point a synergism appears. At one point he explicitly states that good works are a condition of final justification which he regards as necessary for final salvation (Lindstrom, 207)B. Developments within WesleyanismAs Wesleyanism took root in America, it was institutionalized in the context of the circuit rider and revivalism. This had profound results on the form of the teaching. As early as 1784 Francis Asbury advocated preaching the experience of entire sanctification as one which believers should expect immediately by faith. Revivalism emphasized definable turning points in a Christian’s life as essential. Holiness preaching tended to center around Wesley’s sanctification teaching of a second crisis experience subsequent to justification which was commonly termed entire sanctification. From this followed it followed that it was the duty of those who had experienced entire sanctification to confess it and seek to bring others into this experience.As Methodism became respectable, there was a call for a return to the pure doctrine of Wesley. In the latter part of the nineteenth century the National holiness Association was born to promote Wesleyan-holiness theology. Three names are prominent in the promulgation of holiness theology: Phobe Palmer; William Boardman; and Hannah Whitehall Smith.Phobe Palmer’s emphasis becomes key here. Although she says nothing that Wesley did not say a century before, she changes the Wesleyan emphasis subtly, and injects presuppositions foreign to Wesley. Whereas with Wesley the experience of perfection was something to be sought, for Palmer it was vital for continuance of salvation. For Palmer the crisis was vital. Perfection was the beginning of the Christian life and growth in holiness and the focal point of the Christian life. The focus of sanctification tended to be wholly upon a single point of wholehearted commitment, and divorced from any gradual process. “Thus, the moment of death to self and birth to love readily became an end in itself--a goal rather than an essential element in the establishment of a new relationship of freedom and love in the hearts of believers as the Holy Spirit led them from grace to grace in the will of God. (Dieter, 41)C. Key PropositionsSecond Work Of Grace.For the holiness proponents particularly the second work of grace became vital for retaining one’s salvation. Palmer particularly sees justification as dependent upon the believer’s faithfulness. she states:“As I ascended the heavenly way, clearer light shone upon my mind, revealing higher duties, requiring more of the spirit of sacrifice, and furnishing yet stronger tests of obedience. but with increasing light, increasing strength was given, enabling me to be answerable to these higher duties: for I had not learned how to retain justification while under condemnation at the same time for neglecting known duties.”For Palmer the solution lay in sanctification, envisioned as a post conversion crisis. She termed this a crisis because for her the issue was the retention or loss of justification. again she states:“I saw I could not; I must either make the necessary sacrifices, or I must sin, and by my sin forfeit my state of justification. And here my justification would have ended with me had I refused to be holy.”Thus, the second work of grace is really the basis of one’s continuance in salvation.The means of achieving this second work of grace is conceived of as an act of faith akin to the act of faith involved in justification. William Boardman notes:“Whether the question relates to justification or sanctification, the answer is the same. The way of freedom from sin is the same as the way of freedom from condemnation. . . faith in the purifying presence of Jesus.” (Higher Christian Life, 81)This same mentality persists to this day. in the Spring of 1986 I attended a Sanctification Conference sponsored by the C&MA in Piedmont CA. The keynote speaker, the president of the denomination began his first sermon with the words, “There are two gospels, the gospel of justification is for the sinner, the gospel of sanctification for the saint.” Justification is seen as delivering from the penalty of sin, sanctification is seen to deliver from the power of sin.For Boardman, this work of grace is a mystical inauguration into a process:“In the one, atonement has been made, and the moment it is accepted, pardon is complete; in the other, although the righteousness of Christ is perfect in which the soul is to be clothed, yet the work of unfolding . . . is a work of time and progress.” (40)Hannah Whitehall Smith propounds the basic teaching of holiness theology by bifurcating justification and sanctification. Her contribution, no doubt reflecting her Quaker background was the injection of a quietism into the process. She envisions the process as an entire surrender to the Lord, and a perfect trust in Him. She envisions three steps to the process:(1) The Christian must realize the gift of God.“In order therefore to enter into a practical experience of this interior life, the soul must be in a receptive attitude, fully recognizing that it is God’s gift in Christ Jesus.” (The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life, 47)(2) Consecration is necessary.She states that the soul must be abandoned to God and lie passive in His hands (47) “To some minds the word ‘abandonment might express this idea better than the word consecration. But whatever word we use, we mean an entire surrender of the whole being to God--spirit soul and body placed under his absolute control, for Him to do with us as He pleases.”(3) Faith then follows surrender.“Love may be lavished upon us by another without stint or measure, but until we believe we are that we are loved, it never really becomes ours.” (51) She concludes: “In order to enter into this blessed interior life of rest and triumph, you have to take two steps--first entire abandonment; and second absolute faith. (52-54)While, holiness theologies come in many varieties and with various emphases, they all make the crucial disjuncture between justification, appropriated by faith and securing pardon form sin and sanctification/crisis/second work of grace/baptism by the spirit as a post conversion faith experience which breaks the power of sin.Sinlessness:In Wesley’s mind sin was primarily voluntary and was thus intimately bound up with the will. In a sermon on 1 John 3:9 speaking of the privilege of sinlessness he defined sin in a wholly voluntary manner.By sin I here understand outward sin, according to the plain common acceptation [sic] of the word; an actual, voluntary, transgression of the law of God; and of any commandment of God, acknowledged to be such, at the time it is transgressed.Elsewhere speaking of the nature of sin he declared:Not only sin, properly so called, (that is, a voluntary transgression of a known law) but sin, improperly so called, (that is an involuntary transgression of a divine law, known or unknown) needs the atoning blood.I believe there is no such perfection in this life as excludes these involuntary transgressions which I apprehend to be naturally consequent on the ignorance and mistakes inseparable from mortality.Therefore sinless perfection is a phrase I never use, lest I should seem to contradict myself.I believe a person filled with the love of God is still liable to these involuntary transgressions.Such transgressions you may call sin, if you please: I do not, for the reasons above-mentioned. (Works: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 19 (XI, 396)Wesley’s hamartiology “emphasized the willful or spiritual dimensions of sin more than the outward (moral) or cognitive (theoretical knowledge) aspects of it. Sinlessness in this context was more a matter of willing God’s will than replicating God’s perfect knowledge, action, or holiness; sin was more a matter of knowledgeable and willful rebellion against God’s will than a failure or lack of conformity to the glory of God.” (John Tyson, Charles Wesley on Sanctification (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1986) 257.)Christian Perfection:John Wesley saw Christian perfection which was available to all believers in this life as a gift from God and to be accomplished in a moment in time Christian Perfection is that love of God and our neighbor, which implies deliverance from all sin. That this is received merely by faith That it is given instantaneously, in one moment. That we are to expect it, not at death, but at any moment; that is, now is the accepted time, now is the day of this salvationJohn Wesley was adamant about the instantaneous nature of this perfection/sanctification. His brother Charles however more and more brought the process to the forefront as the years progressed.Wesley himself drew up a list of ten propositions concerning perfection which teach a progress-crisis-progress as a model for Christian perfection. In these propositions it can clearly be seen that Wesley does not understand the term teleios in the sense of mature (BAG,187) but rather in the sense of his own definition of sinlessness. There is such a thing as perfection: for it is again and again mentioned in Scripture. It is not so early as justification: for justified persons are to “go on to maturity.” (Heb. 6:1) It is not so late as death; for St. Paul speaks of living men that were perfect (Phil. 3:15) It is not absolute. Absolute perfection belongs not to man, nor to angels, but to God alone. It does not make a man infallible: None is infallible, while he remains in the body. It is sinless? It is not worthwhile to contend for a term. It is ‘salvation from sin.’ It is ‘perfect love.’ (I John 4:18) This is the essence of it; its properties, or inseparable fruits, are, rejoicing evermore, praying without ceasing, and in everything giving thanks. (I Thess. 5:16, etc.) It is improvable. It is so far from lying in an indivisible point, from being incapable of increase, that one perfected in love may grow in grace far swifter than he did before. It is amissible, capable of being lost; of which we have numerous instances. But we were not thoroughly convinced of this, till five or six years ago. It is constantly both preceded and followed by a gradual work.” (WORKS: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 25 (XI, 441-42)).As can be seen from the above quoted propositions, for Wesley perfection was not the equivalent of maturity, but it was to be equated with sinlessness (i.e. voluntary transgression), or love. He explained perfection elsewhere as “perfect love.” “I want you to be all love. This is the perfection I believe and teach.” He was careful not to set perfection too high, recognizing the dangers of “high-strained perfection” which he said led to a thousand nervous disorders. Such high-strained perfection (“so high as no man we have ever heard or read of attained [it]”) would have the unexpected result of driving Christian perfection out of the world.Entire Sanctification:This is “a personal, definitive work of God’s sanctifying grace by which the war within oneself might cease and the heart be fully released from rebellion into wholehearted love for God and others.” (Dieter, 17) This experience has negative and positive benefits. Negatively, it is seen as a cleansing of the heart, which heals the remaining systemic damage from Adam’s transgression. Positively, it, it is a freedom, “a turning of the whole heart toward God in love to seek and to know His will, which becomes the soul’s delight.” (Dieter, 18) Wesley listed the benefits of this sanctification: To love God with all one’s heart and one’s neighbor as oneself; To have the mind that is in Christ; To bear the fruit of the Spirit (in accordance with Gal. 5); The restoration of the image of God in the soul, a recovery of man to the moral image of God, which consists of righteousness and true holiness”; 5.Inward and outward righteousness, “holiness of life issuing from the heart”; God’s sanctifying of the person in spirit, soul and body; The person’s own perfect consecration to God; A continuous presentation through Jesus of the individual’s thoughts, words and actions as a sacrifice to God of praise and thanksgiving; Salvation from all sin. (Wesley, sermon “On Perfection”, Works 6, 413-15.)D. Scriptural SupportWesleyans claim that they approach Scripture holistically and do not rely on proof-texts for their doctrine, and that the holistic teaching of Scripture, its warp and woof, supports their doctrine of Sanctification. Nevertheless there are several passages which form the matrix of their understanding of the nature of sanctification. These include:Deut. 30:6Ezekiel 35:-26, 29Matt. 5:8, 48; 6;10Rom 2:29Rom 12:1-2 Therefore I urge you brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship.Phoebe Palmer a leader in the revival of Wesleyanism in the late 19th century gives a typical holiness exposition of this passage, placing it in the context of the altar of Exodus 29:37. According to Palmer, Christ is the believers altar. Since according to Exodus everything that touched the altar is holy, every Christian who was willing by faith to present himself without reservation as a living sacrifice upon the altar of the finished work of Christ would be entirely sanctified and cleansed from all sin. (Dieter, 39)2 Cor 3:17-18; 7:1Gal 2:20Ephesians 3:14-29; 5:27Phil 3:151 Thess. 5:23Titus 2:11-14;Heb. 6:1; 7:25; 10:14John 8:34-36;John 17:20-23:Commenting on the John 17 passage, Mildred Wynkoop has noted parallels with Ephesians 4:Jesus had in mind a spiritually unified body of believersThat would bring glory to Himself.He died to sanctify them. Al other elements of redemption were included but incidental to this.Sanctification was in word and in truth. This “word” obviously not the Scripture primarily, but was found in living fellowship with the living Word, who is himself Truth.The commission was accompanied by a moral fitness--for the unity of the spirit indicated in both passages is moral clear through.(Wynkoop Theology of Love, 320, cited by Dieter, 32)1 John 1:51 John 7-91 John 2:61 John 3:31 John 3:8-10In commenting on this passage Wesley based his whole thesis upon his definition if sin as voluntary transgression. (see above), James 1:4E. CritiqueRedefinition Of Terminology:The Reformed have for centuries taken Wesley to task for teaching sinless perfection. While this charge is not really accurate, for the reasons shown above, Wesley himself must bear the blame for this charge because of his own redefinition of terms. Packer notes:It was indeed confusing for Wesley to give the name perfection to a state which from many standpoints was one of continued imperfection. It was yet more confusing that he should define sin “properly so called”, subjectively, as “voluntary transgression of a known law,” rather than objectively, as failure, whether conscious or unconscious, voluntary or involuntary, to conform to God’s revealed standards. It was supremely confusing when he let himself speak of sanctified persons as being without sin ( because they were not consciously breaking any known law) while at the same time affirming that they need the blood of Christ every moment to cover their actual shortcomings. Wesley himself insisted that by the objective standard of God’s “perfect law,” every sanctified sinner needs pardon every day; that makes it seem perverse of him also to have insisted on stating his view of the higher Christian life in terms of being perfect and not sinning.Unrealistic Theological Rationale:Wesley at least saw the experience of perfection uprooting and eradicating sinful desire from the heart. His understanding saw this not only as a change in the moral nature but as effecting some kind of a physical change as well. (see Packer 140-141) This thread of Wesley’s teaching has been picked up by such groups as the church of the Nazarene in its teaching of the eradication of the sin nature.Spiritual Elitism:The injection of a second work of grace into the Christian life also leads to a spiritual elitism on the part of those who have attained this “higher life.” There is a subtle tendency to look down patronizingly upon those who have not had this experience. (One of my former students at Simpson recently told me he was going to write an article entitled, “my life as a second class Christian”!)Dangers of Legalism:Particularly in the holiness groups, the Wesleyan concept of perfection as perfect love was exchanged for what Wesley called “high-strained” perfectionism which seeks the absolute perfection of God. To achieve this high standard, sin was redefined in terms of external acts and equated with cultural norms e.g. smoking, drinking, dancing, hair length, makeup, movies. Richard Lovelace speaks eloquently to this problem. . “. .. the conscience cannot accept sanctification unless it is based in a foundation in justification. When this is attempted the resulting insecurity creates a luxuriant overgrowth of religious flesh as believers seek to build a holiness formidable enough to pacify their consciences and quiet their sense of alienation from God. (The Dynamics of Spiritual Life, 104,) “The fully enlightened conscience cannot be pacified by any amount of grace inherent in our lives, since that always falls short of the perfection demanded by God’s law. . . such a conscience is forced to draw back into the relative darkness of self-deception. Either it manufactures a fictitious righteousness in heroic works of ascetic piety, or it redefines sin in shallow terms so that it can lose the consciousness of its presence.” (99)Problems With Exegesis:Wesley’s Scriptural proof of his doctrine (see above) consist of either promises and calls to holiness (with affirmations that God will indeed finally deliver his people from sin) or they are statements of accomplished deliverance which the believer possesses now. “Wesley affirms that the promises find fulfillment in total and absolute terms in this life and appeals to declarations, along with the prayers and commands, to buttress his conclusions.” (Packer, 139). In short he falls victim to a totally realized eschatology rather than seeing the tension of an “already but not yet” with reference to the Christian life.Protestations notwithstanding . . .Wesley in his own life did not rely upon justification for his acceptance before God. He looked to his state of Sanctification and there found that he was less than perfect. This caused him doubt of his salvation.On October 14, 1738 he wrote, “I cannot find in myself the love of God, or of Christ. Hence my deadness and wanderings in public prayer...Again: I find I have not that joy in the Holy Ghost.”On January 4, 1739 he wrote, “My friends affirm I am mad, because I said I was not a Christian a year ago. I affirm I am not a Christian now. Indeed, what I might have been I know not....Though I have constantly used all means of grace for twenty years, I am not a Christian.”On June 27, 1766 he wrote to Charles Wesley, “. . . and yet (this is the mystery) I do not love God. I never did. Therefore I never believed in the Christian sense of the word. Therefore I am only an honest heathen.”Comment by P.T. Forsythe :“It is a fatal mistake to think of holiness as a possession we have distinct from our faith and conferred upon it. That is a Catholic idea, still saturating Protestant Pietism. (see also Dieter, 14.)III. KeswickWith Keswick one finds a different situation than with the Holiness Movement. Whereas Wesleyan holiness theology is traceable directly to Wesley and has clearly identifiable tenets, Keswick is much more amorphous and comes in many varieties from the strict Keswick of a Major Ian Thomas, John Hunter, Alan Redpath and the Torchbearers fellowship to the milder Keswick of Campus Crusade For Christ and Moody Bible Institute and other respected Evangelical educational institutions. Whereas Holiness theology has tended to dominate in Arminian circles, Keswick has tended to dominate American Evangelicalism of a more Calvinistic bent. Indeed Packer asserts that it has become standard in virtually all of Evangelicalism except confessional Reformed and Lutheran.(151)A. Keswick OriginsIdeological roots: Holiness TheologyCharles Finney & Oberlin TheologyPhobe Palmer & Entire DevotionWilliam Boardman & The Higher Christian LifeHannah Whitehall Smith & The Christian Secret of a Happy LifeHistoric Origins:The term Keswick derives its name from a small community in the Lake district of England. In the wake of the Moody-Sankey campaigns there was an increased thirst for personal holiness and spiritual victory in the lives of many English Evangelicals. T. D. Harford-Battersby, vicar of Keswick was such a man. He had attended the Oxford meetings led by Robert Pearsall Smith and William Boardman 1874. (Bible.org) ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 63 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
  1  2 3  NEXT >  


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to [email protected]
Copyright©2019. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie