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1 The Complete Angler, or Contemplative Man's Recreation being A Discourse on Rivers, Fish-Ponds, Fish and Fishing
London, England L. A. Lewis, 125, Fleet-Street 1839 Various Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Leather binding has been repaired with a complete new leather spine (Dark brown with boards lighter leather). Foxing on some pages and end papers otherwise clean and bright. Engravings and drawings. . Includes notes biographical and explanatory and the lives of the authors. THe epistle dedicatory is to the right worshipful John Offley of Madley Manor, in the county of Stafford, Esq. There is also an epistle to the reader. The descriptive list of the Embellishments (woodcuts and copper plates) contains a detailed description of each "embellishment" including source, artist, etc. Also contains a entensive notes section with" biographical notices of the principal persons mentioned in the complete angler". In addition to the lives of Walton and Cotton the contents include: Chapter I. A conference betwixt an angler, a hunter, and a falconer; each commending his recreation. Chapter II. Observations of the Otter and the Chub. Chapter III. How to fish for, and to dress the Chavender, or Chub. Chapter IV. Observations of the nature and breeding of the Trout, and how to fish for him. And the Milkmaid's song. Chapter V. More directions how to fish for, and how to make for the Trout an artificial minnowandflies; withsomemerriment. Chapter VI. Observations of the Umber or Grayling, and directions how to fish for him. Chapter VII. Observations of the Salmon: With directions how to fish for him. Chapter VIII. Observations of the Luce or Pike, with directions how to fish for him. Chapter IX. Observations of the Carp, with directions how to fish for him. Chapter X. Observations of the Bream, and directions to catch him. Chapter XI. Observations of the Tench, and advice how to angle for him. Chapter XII. Observations of the Pearch, and directions how to fish for him. Chapter XIII. Observations of the Eel, and other fish that want scales, and [directions how] to fish for them. Chapter XIV. Observations of the Barbel, and directions how to fish for him. Chapter XV. Observations of the Gudgeon, the Ruffe, and the Bleak, and how to fish for them. Chapter XVI. Is of nothing; or that which is nothing worth. Chapter XVII. Of Roach and Dace and how to fish for them; and of Cadis. Chapter XVIII. Of the Minnow or Penk, of the Loach, and of the Bull-head, or Miller's-thumb. Chapter XIX. Of several rivers, and some observations of fish. Chapter XX. Of Fish-ponds, and how to oreder them. Chapter XXI. Directions for making of a line, and for the colouring of both rod and line. Part II. being instructions how to angle for a Trout and Grayling in a clear stream. To my most worthy Father and Friend, Mr. Izaak Walton, the elder. To my most honoured Friend, Charles Cotton, Esq. The Retirement: Irregular verses addressed to Mr. Izaak Walton. Chapter I. Conference between a country Gentleman proficient in fly-fishing, and a Traveller who becomes his pupil. Chapter II. An account of the principal rivers in Derbyshire. Viator lodges at Piscator's house. Chapter III. Conference containing a description of Cotton's Fishing-house, with his apology for writing a supplement toWalton'sbook.ChapterIV.Ofangling for Trout and Grayling, divided into three branches. Chapter V. Of Fly-fishing. Chapter VI. Fishing at the top continued--- Further directions for fly-making--- Time when the Grayling is in season--- Rock in Pikepool. Chapter VII. Fishing at the top--- Flies for the months of January, February, March, April, and part of May; including, under May, particular directions how to bait with the Green-drake. Chapter VIII. Fishing at the top, continued--- Flies for the end of May, and for the following months, till December; containing, under May, instructions when to dape with the Stone-fly. Chapter IX. Fly-fishing, in windy weather, best in the still-deeps. Chapter X. Directions how to dress a Trout and Grayling. Chapter XI. Of angling at the bottom for Trout or Grayling--- By hand, with a running line--- With a cork or float--- Various baits. Chapter XII. Of angling in the middle for Trout or Grayling.While not a first printing this is an excellent rebound collectible copy. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. 
Price: 299.97 USD
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2 Atcheson, Wayne Faith of the Crimson Tide Inspiring Alabama Sports Stories of Faith
Cross Training Publishing 2000 1929478224 / 9781929478224 First Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by author on end paper. Subtitle: Inspiring Alabama Sports Stories of Faith

This book features moving stories of faith from Alabama athletes, coaches and staff. These (sometimes humours) stories are taken from events with Crimson Tide athletics; from events during games, practices and in the locker room. They deal with a variety of spiritual issues like role models, adversity, illness, tragedy, hardship, decision-making, forgiveness, death, patience and love. Featuring stories from: Shaun Alexander, Coach Ronnie Cottrell, Coach Mike DuBose, Tommy Ford, Chad & Leah Goss, Coach Mark Gottfried, Coach Charlie Harbison, Coach Ellis Johnson, Kermit Koenig, Bill McDonald, Coach Rick Moody, Coach Betty Palmer, Coach David Patterson, Ryan Pflugner, Andy Phillips, John David Phillips, Coach Robert Scott, Coach Dick Spybey, Kevn Stephen, and Coach Jim Wells. ; 1.06 x 8.86 x 5.94 Inches; 288 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 18.97 USD

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Suki and the Magic Sand Dollar  (Author Signed), Blackburn, Joyce; Clayton, Stephanie
3 Blackburn, Joyce; Clayton, Stephanie Suki and the Magic Sand Dollar (Author Signed)
Providence House Publishers 1996 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Near Fine condition! Silver Anniversary edition. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Like new. Signed twice by author. Once in inscription and once on title page. Suki could never have guessed all that she would experience while visiting St. Simons Island, Georgia. Until then, she had never flown in a plane, seen the ocean (except in pictures), set foot on an island, nor met a real scientist. From a fun and friendly woman named Cherry, Suki discovers the built-in clocks of nature. Because the clocks are so dependable, Suki becomes convinced that there is someone in full charge who makes everything work together. While Suki learns many scientific facts, her trip mostly teaches her about people, making and sharing friends. Rare. ; 0.5 x 10.1 x 6.9 Inches; 64 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 32.97 USD
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South Beach Shakedown  The Diary of Gideon Pike (Author Signed), Bruns, Don
4 Bruns, Don South Beach Shakedown The Diary of Gideon Pike (Author Signed)
Oceanview Publishing 2006 1933515023 / 9781933515021 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Looks new. Signed by Author on Title Page. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. "A hearty welcome to musician-turned-novelist Don Bruns, whose South Beach Shakedown offers readers a high-energy romp through the uncomfortably parallel worlds of the pop music industry and the criminal underbelly of Miami. Entertainment journalist Mick Sever owes his career to pop star Gideon Pike. Pike allowed Sever into his inner circle back when Sever was a fledgling reporter, and that entrée put Sever on the map. Fame went to Sever’s head (not to mention his liver and his neural synapses) as he lived in the shadow of the pop idol; his excesses cost him his marriage, and very nearly his career as well. Now Gideon Pike is in a jam, and through a mutual acquaintance (Sever’s ex-wife, for whom Sever still carries an Olympic-size torch) he has summoned the writer to help bail him out. It will not be easy, though, for when Sever arrives in Miami, he finds that Gideon Pike has disappeared, and that Pike’s compadres are dropping like flies. A Korean mobster adds a bit of Asian! spice to the dish, and Sever’s ex, Ginny, supplies the sizzling heat. The banter, particularly between Sever and Ginny, is relaxed and believable, just what you’d expect from old lovers who are still friends. With the relentlessly action-packed South Beach Shakedown, Bruns has crafted what may be this season’s quintessential suspense read." Someone is about to make a killing in the music industry.

Why would songwriting legend Gideon Pike mysteriously disappear just when he is about to turn his 30-year career into a multi-million dollar profit?

Music columnist Mick Sever is back in Don Bruns’ third suspense masterpiece. This time he’s looking for answers and his missing friend in the gritty backrooms of South Beach’s biggest nightclubs, dodging suicide speedboats and running from sniper fire. What surfaces is how the major players in the music industry are not making the headlines, they’re just pulling the strings that create them. Hit it right, and the royalties – even someone else’s – can rake in millions for the rest of your life. The key is finding Gideon before Korean mobster Jimmy Shinn does. Jimmy is ready to cash in on the one secret that will bring Gideon to his knees and strip away what’s left of his career, his fortune, and his life. Whoever gets to Gideon first will either save him or pull the trigger. The deadly race is on. Tami Brady, TMC Reviews "Gideon Pike goes missing. Nobody knows if the man killed his gay lover and fled, if he’s hiding from the real killer, or if he’s skipped town on one of his occasional trips that usually happen when Pike owes someone money. "Even after I read this book, I still wasn’t sure whether I liked Gideon Pike or not. The guy seemed like such a sleaze at times, had so many secrets, and had layer upon layer of hidden lives that I wasn’t really sure if I ever got to see the real man behind all the smoke and mirrors. Moreover, when finally faced with the complex realities and dynamic personality of the man, I wasn’t sure how much of the made up situations and fantasies that Pike actually believed. "Despite this, or more likely because of these aspects, I couldn’t seem to put this book down. I was so eager to figure out if Pike was still alive, who had committed the murders, and the real truth behind all the deceptions that I had to keep turning the pages." Cathy Yanda for Readers Views "This is not the first time these characters meet in one of Don Bruns’ books. You may not have met them before, but it will not take you long to become well acquainted with them. In this adventure, Mick Sever, an entertainment writer, teams up with his ex-wife Ginny (did I mention he is still in love with her?) to solve the disappearance of Gideon Pike in South Miami Beach. While trying to locate the missing music icon, Gideon Pike, Ginny and Mick find themselves in more situations than you would find in a Jackie Chan movie. South Beach Shakedown is lean, fast paced and complex. There are murders, blackmail, dirty deeds, mobsters, near-death misses, speedboats, a cast of interesting people and plenty of scantily-clad women. If this book is not made into a movie, Bruce Willis will have certainly missed a great entertainment opportunity. "If you are looking for a book that will leave you with a great deal more knowledge than you already had, skip this one. However, if you are looking for a book that is absolutely a hoot to read and will leave you laughing and wanting more, you cannot miss with South Beach Shakedown. Once you finish, you will want to check out Don Bruns’ other books as well."; 1.2 x 9.3 x 6.1 Inches; 288 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 9.97 USD

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Milwaukee Under the Charter From 1847 ro 1853, Buck, James S.
5 Buck, James S. Milwaukee Under the Charter From 1847 ro 1853
Symes, Swain & Co. Printers 1884 Various Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
This volume (III), is a continuation of the authors work on the "Pioneer portion" of the city's history in volume I and II. This volume brings the history down to 1853, thus making it a valuble stand alone history of the period 1847-1853. It contains a list of settlers and a list of vessels built at Milwaukee. Cover is very worn an soiled, hinges loose but not seperated. Contents very clean. Contains engravings and fold out. Fully indexed. Scarce. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Vol. 3; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 506 pages 
Price: 99.99 USD
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BARBARA BUSH (Author Signed)  A Memoir, Bush, Barbara
6 Bush, Barbara BARBARA BUSH (Author Signed) A Memoir
New York , NY Charles Scribners Sons 1994 0025196359 / 9780025196353 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Violet cover. Dust not price clipped. Original signature on bookplate in addition to machine signature. Very clean almost new condition. Mrs. Bush is an engaging women that through adversity and trial will be remembered for her strength and poise. After her husband (George Bush Sr.) finished his presidency she became a well known speaker and advoate for literacy. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover. Rare signed copy.; Photos; 1.9 x 9.56 x 6.52 Inches; 512 pages;

Barbara Bush is certainly among the most popular First Ladies ever to live in the White House. Politics aside, people worldwide have come to admire her wit, her candor and compassion, as well as her unswerving devotion to her husband and children.

In her memoir, Mrs. Bush for the first time gives readers a very private look at a life lived in the public eye for more than twenty-five years. She begins with a compelling portrait of her early years, including: growing up in Rye, New York, and meeting George Bush; life as a young bride and mother, moving far away from home to West Texas; and the almost unbearable pain of losing a child.

With contemporary American history as the backdrop, Mrs. Bush remembers the shock of learning that her fiancé has been shot down in the Pacific during World War II; the disbelief when a black friend is refused service in a Southern restaurant in the 1950s; and the fear when she is caught in the middle of a student protest march in the 1960s.

She recounts her years in public life, from first moving to Washington when George Bush was elected to Congress; to her experience living in New York as the wife of the Ambassador to the United Nations and in China as wife of the U.S. envoy. She talks candidly about the ups and downs of three presidential campaigns and describes her role as the wife of the Vice President, culminating in the climactic White House years.

Drawing upon excerpts from her diary, which she has compiled for more than thirty years, Mrs. Bush takes us behind the scenes of the Persian Gulf conflict and the end of the Cold War. She talks about both the Bushes' struggle to overcome Graves' disease and how she faced the controversy that erupted at Wellesley College before her commencement speech.

Through the friendships she developed over the years with world leaders and their spouses, we meet and get to know the Gorbachevs, the Thatchers, the Mitterrands, the Mubaraks, and many others. And she tells us why she threw so much of her energy and compassion behind the important cause of making more Americans literate.

This memoir includes hundreds of the funny, often self-deprecating, and occasionally touching anecdotes for which Mrs. Bush is well known: surprising a rat while swimming in the White House pool; accidentally stomping on Boris Yeltsin's foot under the table during a state dinner; wearing a $29 pair of shoes for her husband's inaugural ball.

She also talks about the disappointments of the 1992 presidential campaign and the joys of rediscovering private life, including driving and cooking again for the first time in twelve years.

This is a warm and funny memoir that will charm Mrs. Bush's millions of admirers and earn her many more.; Signed by Author 
Price: 399.97 USD

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7 Capon, Noel & John Farley & James Hulbert Corporate Strategic Planning
Columbia University Press 1987 0231063806 / 9780231063807 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 
Blue cover with gold lettering. Looks new, never used. A classic work on Strategic Planning. ; 1.4 x 9.26 x 6.39 Inches; 482 pages 
Price: 39.97 USD
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Heart talks, Carradine, B
8 Carradine, B Heart talks
God's Revivalist Office 1899 Third Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Contents clean, pages tight. Back cover has discoloration. Edges show signs of edgewear, overall good copy. Has small paper label with Mrs. Dale Chappell's name and signed by F.L. Chappell from Nampa, Idaho the location of a Nazarene University. The Chappell name is notable in Holiness history. Born April 4, 1842, in Yazoo County, Mississippi, he moved with his family the Yazoo City in 1852. He served with the Confederate Army for the last five months of the Civil War. Educated at the University of Mississippi, he was ordained a Methodist elder in 1878. He served in parsonages in New Orleans and Mississippi.Carradine wrote 26 books which primarily advanced his religious beliefs. Several of his books were centered on the concept of sanctification. He also wrote about his opposition to the Louisiana lottery making an analogy between it and slavery. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.; 278 pages; p 
Price: 14.97 USD
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Revival incidents, Carradine, B
9 Carradine, B Revival incidents
Chicago, Ill Christian Witness Co 1913 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Green cover with gold lettering. A rare copy of authors book on revivals. Many sermons including, but not limited to, The Restitutions of a Revival Meeting, The Revelations of a Revival Meeting, Decepments of a Revival Meeting, Strange Cases, The Remuneration in some Meetings, and many more. Born April 4, 1842, in Yazoo County, Mississippi, he moved with his family the Yazoo City in 1852. He served with the Confederate Army for the last five months of the Civil War. Educated at the University of Mississippi, he was ordained a Methodist elder in 1878. He served in parsonages in New Orleans and Mississippi.Carradine wrote 26 books which primarily advanced his religious beliefs. Several of his books were centered on the concept of sanctification. He also wrote about his opposition to the Louisiana lottery making an analogy between it and slavery. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.; 245 pages 
Price: 29.97 USD
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THE SECOND BLESSING IN SYMBOL, Carradine, B.
10 Carradine, B. THE SECOND BLESSING IN SYMBOL
Chicago, Ill The Christian Witness Company 1893 Third Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Green cover with gold print. Prior owner's name in front. (Rev. Roy McKinney Nazarene evangelist.) Born April 4, 1842, in Yazoo County, Mississippi, the author moved with his family the Yazoo City in 1852. He served with the Confederate Army for the last five months of the Civil War. Educated at the University of Mississippi, he was ordained a Methodist elder in 1878. He served in parsonages in New Orleans and Mississippi.Carradine wrote 26 books which primarily advanced his religious beliefs. Several of his books were centered on the concept of sanctification. He also wrote about his opposition to the Louisiana lottery making an analogy between it and slavery. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.Very clean contents. 
Price: 95.97 USD
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Sanctification, Carradine, Rev. B. & Rev. L. L. Pickett
11 Carradine, Rev. B. & Rev. L. L. Pickett Sanctification
Columbia, SC L. L. Pickett 1890 1st Thus; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Orangish cover with gold print. Floral design on cover. Corners dented and worn. Contents clean. Rare work by author on sanctification. Introduction by Rev. L. L. Pickett. Born April 4, 1842, in Yazoo County, Mississippi, he moved with his family the Yazoo City in 1852. He served with the Confederate Army for the last five months of the Civil War. Educated at the University of Mississippi, he was ordained a Methodist elder in 1878. He served in parsonages in New Orleans and Mississippi. [3]Carradine wrote 26 books[4] which primarily advanced his religious beliefs. Several of his books were centered on the concept of sanctification. He also wrote about his opposition to the Louisiana lottery making an analogy between it and slavery.This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. 
Price: 89.97 USD
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The History of the Wellesley Congregational Church, Chandler, Edward Herrick
12 Chandler, Edward Herrick The History of the Wellesley Congregational Church
Boston, MA Benj. H. Sanborn 1898 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Original 1898 printing. Red cover with gold lettering. Clear Mylar protector over book. Front hinge cracked. Extensive name index for genealogy. Includes a section on "The influnece of the Church in the Making of New England". Scarce in this condition. ; Photos; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 232 pages 
Price: 69.97 USD
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The World of Patience Gromes  Making and Unmaking a Black Community, Davis, Scott C.
13 Davis, Scott C. The World of Patience Gromes Making and Unmaking a Black Community
Lexington, KY The University Press of Kentucky 1988 0813116449 / 9780813116440 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Black cloth. Dust in brodart mylar protective cover! Bibliography. Inscribed by author. We provide delivery tracking on US orders.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 219 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 9.97 USD
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CHRONICLES OF BARABBAS 1884-1934---and FURTHER CHRONICLES AND COMMENT-- with Sinclair Lewis, Maugham and Mencken and Christopher Morley Contributing Candid Portrait Reviews, Doran, George Henry
14 Doran, George Henry CHRONICLES OF BARABBAS 1884-1934---and FURTHER CHRONICLES AND COMMENT-- with Sinclair Lewis, Maugham and Mencken and Christopher Morley Contributing Candid Portrait Reviews
New York Rinehart and Co Inc 1952 1st Edition Thus; First Impression Hardcover Good in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Blue grey cover with black cloth quarter spine. Cover is sunfaded around edges. Dust in near fine condition and covered with mylar cover.There is an inscription to Betty & Bob on front endpaper signed by Doran. (poor handwriting but looks to be 1953) Looks as though Doran signed this book again in 1954 (clear handwriting) on next page with additional inscription. There is a third original signature by Doran under his photo opposite title page. A fourth notable addition is a signed letter from George Doran to a Betty Weber in Chicago with postal cancellation dated May 1944 from Prescott, Arizona where the author lived . In the letter he mentions he is sending his book Chronicles of Barabbas which he published in 1934. The letter, envelope, and news articles of his death were all inside this the 1952 edition. Doran mentions his friendship with the Weber's and it appears they kept his letter in their copy of this 1952 Chronicles of Barabbas. A very rare if not unique set of memoriablia from the life of George Doran. George H. Doran was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1869. He moved frequently from New York City to London, England during his publishing career, and was well acquainted with most of the writers he published. In 1935, George Doran wrote Chronicles of Barabbas 1884-1934, that told about the publishing business and its personalities. It was republished in 1952 with Further chronicles and Comment added to the title. Doran was friends with most of the authors he published including: Joyce Kilmer, P. G. Wodehouse, Arnold Bennett, Arnold J. Toynbee, Theodore Roosevelt, Arthur Conan Doyle, O. Henry, James J. Montague, Edwin Lefèvre, Virginia Woolf, Frank Harris, H.G. Wells, W. Somerset Maugham, Sinclair Lewis, H.L. Mencken and Margery Williams. George H. Doran Company merged with Doubleday, Page & Company in 1927, making Doubleday, Doran the largest publishing business in the English-speaking world. A very rare book and collection of memoriablia. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 446 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 449.97 USD
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CHRONICLES OF BARABBAS 1884-1934---and FURTHER CHRONICLES AND COMMENT-- with Sinclair Lewis, Maugham and Mencken and Christopher Morley Contributing Candid Portrait Reviews, Doran, George Henry
15 Doran, George Henry CHRONICLES OF BARABBAS 1884-1934---and FURTHER CHRONICLES AND COMMENT-- with Sinclair Lewis, Maugham and Mencken and Christopher Morley Contributing Candid Portrait Reviews
New York Rinehart and Co Inc 1952 1st Edition Thus; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 
Blue grey cover with black cloth quarter spine. George H. Doran was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1869. He moved frequently from New York City to London, England during his publishing career, and was well acquainted with most of the writers he published. In 1935, George Doran wrote Chronicles of Barabbas 1884-1934, that told about the publishing business and its personalities. It was republished in 1952 with Further chronicles and Comment added to the title. Doran was friends with most of the authors he published including: Joyce Kilmer, P. G. Wodehouse, Arnold Bennett, Arnold J. Toynbee, Theodore Roosevelt, Arthur Conan Doyle, O. Henry, James J. Montague, Edwin Lefèvre, Virginia Woolf, Frank Harris, H.G. Wells, W. Somerset Maugham, Sinclair Lewis, H.L. Mencken and Margery Williams. George H. Doran Company merged with Doubleday, Page & Company in 1927, making Doubleday, Doran the largest publishing business in the English-speaking world. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 446 pages 
Price: 11.97 USD
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Keswickism, Godbey, W.B.
16 Godbey, W.B. Keswickism
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Booklet's cover is detached and has chips. Contents complete. Rare work by Godbey on Keswickism. Rare if not unique. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life.II. Wesley and WesleyanismA. Wesley & SanctificationIn the theology of John Wesley one finds a new direction, distinct both from Reformed and classic Arminianism Wesley built his understanding of the nature of man solidly upon the Reformed position of original sin, and the subsequent necessity of divine grace for salvation. Here however he parted company with the reformers and injected the doctrine of prevenient grace, (all men have received of the Holy Spirit the ability to respond to God) into his understanding of the doctrine of salvation. Wesley rejected the Reformed concept of election , opting instead for the Arminian concept of conditional election. Thus he joined the Reformed doctrine of the total sinfulness of the individual and the primacy of grace with the Arminian stress on human freedom, with its subsequent moral obligations. But his doctrine of Sanctification was not traditional Arminianism Wesley was also heavily influenced by the mystics. Packer has observed that he superimposed“on the Augustinianism of the Anglican prayer book and the heaven aspiring High Church moralist in which he was reared a concept of perfection . . . that he had learned from the Greek Patristic sources. “Macarius the Egyptian” . . . and Ephraem Syrus were chief among these. There idea of perfection was not of sinlessness, but of an ever deepening process of all around moral change. To this idea Wesley then added the lesson he had learned form those whom he called the “mystic writers” (a category including the Anglican William Law, the Roman Catholics Molinos, Fenelon, Gaston de Renty, Francis de Sales, and Madame Guyon, the Lutheran Pietist Francke, and the pre-reformation Theologia Gremanica) The lesson was that the heart of true godliness is a motivating spirit of love to God and man; without this all religion is hollow and empty. (Keep In Step with the Spirit,134)Wesley asserted the primacy of justification, and the assurance the believer could have based upon the righteousness of Christ. However, his Arminian view of election creeps into his view of final salvation. He views the process of Sanctification as one of making the individual worthy of salvation. This process is a work of God, but it is also a work of man. At this point a synergism appears. At one point he explicitly states that good works are a condition of final justification which he regards as necessary for final salvation (Lindstrom, 207)B. Developments within WesleyanismAs Wesleyanism took root in America, it was institutionalized in the context of the circuit rider and revivalism. This had profound results on the form of the teaching. As early as 1784 Francis Asbury advocated preaching the experience of entire sanctification as one which believers should expect immediately by faith. Revivalism emphasized definable turning points in a Christian’s life as essential. Holiness preaching tended to center around Wesley’s sanctification teaching of a second crisis experience subsequent to justification which was commonly termed entire sanctification. From this followed it followed that it was the duty of those who had experienced entire sanctification to confess it and seek to bring others into this experience.As Methodism became respectable, there was a call for a return to the pure doctrine of Wesley. In the latter part of the nineteenth century the National holiness Association was born to promote Wesleyan-holiness theology. Three names are prominent in the promulgation of holiness theology: Phobe Palmer; William Boardman; and Hannah Whitehall Smith.Phobe Palmer’s emphasis becomes key here. Although she says nothing that Wesley did not say a century before, she changes the Wesleyan emphasis subtly, and injects presuppositions foreign to Wesley. Whereas with Wesley the experience of perfection was something to be sought, for Palmer it was vital for continuance of salvation. For Palmer the crisis was vital. Perfection was the beginning of the Christian life and growth in holiness and the focal point of the Christian life. The focus of sanctification tended to be wholly upon a single point of wholehearted commitment, and divorced from any gradual process. “Thus, the moment of death to self and birth to love readily became an end in itself--a goal rather than an essential element in the establishment of a new relationship of freedom and love in the hearts of believers as the Holy Spirit led them from grace to grace in the will of God. (Dieter, 41)C. Key PropositionsSecond Work Of Grace.For the holiness proponents particularly the second work of grace became vital for retaining one’s salvation. Palmer particularly sees justification as dependent upon the believer’s faithfulness. she states:“As I ascended the heavenly way, clearer light shone upon my mind, revealing higher duties, requiring more of the spirit of sacrifice, and furnishing yet stronger tests of obedience. but with increasing light, increasing strength was given, enabling me to be answerable to these higher duties: for I had not learned how to retain justification while under condemnation at the same time for neglecting known duties.”For Palmer the solution lay in sanctification, envisioned as a post conversion crisis. She termed this a crisis because for her the issue was the retention or loss of justification. again she states:“I saw I could not; I must either make the necessary sacrifices, or I must sin, and by my sin forfeit my state of justification. And here my justification would have ended with me had I refused to be holy.”Thus, the second work of grace is really the basis of one’s continuance in salvation.The means of achieving this second work of grace is conceived of as an act of faith akin to the act of faith involved in justification. William Boardman notes:“Whether the question relates to justification or sanctification, the answer is the same. The way of freedom from sin is the same as the way of freedom from condemnation. . . faith in the purifying presence of Jesus.” (Higher Christian Life, 81)This same mentality persists to this day. in the Spring of 1986 I attended a Sanctification Conference sponsored by the C&MA in Piedmont CA. The keynote speaker, the president of the denomination began his first sermon with the words, “There are two gospels, the gospel of justification is for the sinner, the gospel of sanctification for the saint.” Justification is seen as delivering from the penalty of sin, sanctification is seen to deliver from the power of sin.For Boardman, this work of grace is a mystical inauguration into a process:“In the one, atonement has been made, and the moment it is accepted, pardon is complete; in the other, although the righteousness of Christ is perfect in which the soul is to be clothed, yet the work of unfolding . . . is a work of time and progress.” (40)Hannah Whitehall Smith propounds the basic teaching of holiness theology by bifurcating justification and sanctification. Her contribution, no doubt reflecting her Quaker background was the injection of a quietism into the process. She envisions the process as an entire surrender to the Lord, and a perfect trust in Him. She envisions three steps to the process:(1) The Christian must realize the gift of God.“In order therefore to enter into a practical experience of this interior life, the soul must be in a receptive attitude, fully recognizing that it is God’s gift in Christ Jesus.” (The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life, 47)(2) Consecration is necessary.She states that the soul must be abandoned to God and lie passive in His hands (47) “To some minds the word ‘abandonment might express this idea better than the word consecration. But whatever word we use, we mean an entire surrender of the whole being to God--spirit soul and body placed under his absolute control, for Him to do with us as He pleases.”(3) Faith then follows surrender.“Love may be lavished upon us by another without stint or measure, but until we believe we are that we are loved, it never really becomes ours.” (51) She concludes: “In order to enter into this blessed interior life of rest and triumph, you have to take two steps--first entire abandonment; and second absolute faith. (52-54)While, holiness theologies come in many varieties and with various emphases, they all make the crucial disjuncture between justification, appropriated by faith and securing pardon form sin and sanctification/crisis/second work of grace/baptism by the spirit as a post conversion faith experience which breaks the power of sin.Sinlessness:In Wesley’s mind sin was primarily voluntary and was thus intimately bound up with the will. In a sermon on 1 John 3:9 speaking of the privilege of sinlessness he defined sin in a wholly voluntary manner.By sin I here understand outward sin, according to the plain common acceptation [sic] of the word; an actual, voluntary, transgression of the law of God; and of any commandment of God, acknowledged to be such, at the time it is transgressed.Elsewhere speaking of the nature of sin he declared:Not only sin, properly so called, (that is, a voluntary transgression of a known law) but sin, improperly so called, (that is an involuntary transgression of a divine law, known or unknown) needs the atoning blood.I believe there is no such perfection in this life as excludes these involuntary transgressions which I apprehend to be naturally consequent on the ignorance and mistakes inseparable from mortality.Therefore sinless perfection is a phrase I never use, lest I should seem to contradict myself.I believe a person filled with the love of God is still liable to these involuntary transgressions.Such transgressions you may call sin, if you please: I do not, for the reasons above-mentioned. (Works: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 19 (XI, 396)Wesley’s hamartiology “emphasized the willful or spiritual dimensions of sin more than the outward (moral) or cognitive (theoretical knowledge) aspects of it. Sinlessness in this context was more a matter of willing God’s will than replicating God’s perfect knowledge, action, or holiness; sin was more a matter of knowledgeable and willful rebellion against God’s will than a failure or lack of conformity to the glory of God.” (John Tyson, Charles Wesley on Sanctification (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1986) 257.)Christian Perfection:John Wesley saw Christian perfection which was available to all believers in this life as a gift from God and to be accomplished in a moment in time Christian Perfection is that love of God and our neighbor, which implies deliverance from all sin. That this is received merely by faith That it is given instantaneously, in one moment. That we are to expect it, not at death, but at any moment; that is, now is the accepted time, now is the day of this salvationJohn Wesley was adamant about the instantaneous nature of this perfection/sanctification. His brother Charles however more and more brought the process to the forefront as the years progressed.Wesley himself drew up a list of ten propositions concerning perfection which teach a progress-crisis-progress as a model for Christian perfection. In these propositions it can clearly be seen that Wesley does not understand the term teleios in the sense of mature (BAG,187) but rather in the sense of his own definition of sinlessness. There is such a thing as perfection: for it is again and again mentioned in Scripture. It is not so early as justification: for justified persons are to “go on to maturity.” (Heb. 6:1) It is not so late as death; for St. Paul speaks of living men that were perfect (Phil. 3:15) It is not absolute. Absolute perfection belongs not to man, nor to angels, but to God alone. It does not make a man infallible: None is infallible, while he remains in the body. It is sinless? It is not worthwhile to contend for a term. It is ‘salvation from sin.’ It is ‘perfect love.’ (I John 4:18) This is the essence of it; its properties, or inseparable fruits, are, rejoicing evermore, praying without ceasing, and in everything giving thanks. (I Thess. 5:16, etc.) It is improvable. It is so far from lying in an indivisible point, from being incapable of increase, that one perfected in love may grow in grace far swifter than he did before. It is amissible, capable of being lost; of which we have numerous instances. But we were not thoroughly convinced of this, till five or six years ago. It is constantly both preceded and followed by a gradual work.” (WORKS: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 25 (XI, 441-42)).As can be seen from the above quoted propositions, for Wesley perfection was not the equivalent of maturity, but it was to be equated with sinlessness (i.e. voluntary transgression), or love. He explained perfection elsewhere as “perfect love.” “I want you to be all love. This is the perfection I believe and teach.” He was careful not to set perfection too high, recognizing the dangers of “high-strained perfection” which he said led to a thousand nervous disorders. Such high-strained perfection (“so high as no man we have ever heard or read of attained [it]”) would have the unexpected result of driving Christian perfection out of the world.Entire Sanctification:This is “a personal, definitive work of God’s sanctifying grace by which the war within oneself might cease and the heart be fully released from rebellion into wholehearted love for God and others.” (Dieter, 17) This experience has negative and positive benefits. Negatively, it is seen as a cleansing of the heart, which heals the remaining systemic damage from Adam’s transgression. Positively, it, it is a freedom, “a turning of the whole heart toward God in love to seek and to know His will, which becomes the soul’s delight.” (Dieter, 18) Wesley listed the benefits of this sanctification: To love God with all one’s heart and one’s neighbor as oneself; To have the mind that is in Christ; To bear the fruit of the Spirit (in accordance with Gal. 5); The restoration of the image of God in the soul, a recovery of man to the moral image of God, which consists of righteousness and true holiness”; 5.Inward and outward righteousness, “holiness of life issuing from the heart”; God’s sanctifying of the person in spirit, soul and body; The person’s own perfect consecration to God; A continuous presentation through Jesus of the individual’s thoughts, words and actions as a sacrifice to God of praise and thanksgiving; Salvation from all sin. (Wesley, sermon “On Perfection”, Works 6, 413-15.)D. Scriptural SupportWesleyans claim that they approach Scripture holistically and do not rely on proof-texts for their doctrine, and that the holistic teaching of Scripture, its warp and woof, supports their doctrine of Sanctification. Nevertheless there are several passages which form the matrix of their understanding of the nature of sanctification. These include:Deut. 30:6Ezekiel 35:-26, 29Matt. 5:8, 48; 6;10Rom 2:29Rom 12:1-2 Therefore I urge you brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship.Phoebe Palmer a leader in the revival of Wesleyanism in the late 19th century gives a typical holiness exposition of this passage, placing it in the context of the altar of Exodus 29:37. According to Palmer, Christ is the believers altar. Since according to Exodus everything that touched the altar is holy, every Christian who was willing by faith to present himself without reservation as a living sacrifice upon the altar of the finished work of Christ would be entirely sanctified and cleansed from all sin. (Dieter, 39)2 Cor 3:17-18; 7:1Gal 2:20Ephesians 3:14-29; 5:27Phil 3:151 Thess. 5:23Titus 2:11-14;Heb. 6:1; 7:25; 10:14John 8:34-36;John 17:20-23:Commenting on the John 17 passage, Mildred Wynkoop has noted parallels with Ephesians 4:Jesus had in mind a spiritually unified body of believersThat would bring glory to Himself.He died to sanctify them. Al other elements of redemption were included but incidental to this.Sanctification was in word and in truth. This “word” obviously not the Scripture primarily, but was found in living fellowship with the living Word, who is himself Truth.The commission was accompanied by a moral fitness--for the unity of the spirit indicated in both passages is moral clear through.(Wynkoop Theology of Love, 320, cited by Dieter, 32)1 John 1:51 John 7-91 John 2:61 John 3:31 John 3:8-10In commenting on this passage Wesley based his whole thesis upon his definition if sin as voluntary transgression. (see above), James 1:4E. CritiqueRedefinition Of Terminology:The Reformed have for centuries taken Wesley to task for teaching sinless perfection. While this charge is not really accurate, for the reasons shown above, Wesley himself must bear the blame for this charge because of his own redefinition of terms. Packer notes:It was indeed confusing for Wesley to give the name perfection to a state which from many standpoints was one of continued imperfection. It was yet more confusing that he should define sin “properly so called”, subjectively, as “voluntary transgression of a known law,” rather than objectively, as failure, whether conscious or unconscious, voluntary or involuntary, to conform to God’s revealed standards. It was supremely confusing when he let himself speak of sanctified persons as being without sin ( because they were not consciously breaking any known law) while at the same time affirming that they need the blood of Christ every moment to cover their actual shortcomings. Wesley himself insisted that by the objective standard of God’s “perfect law,” every sanctified sinner needs pardon every day; that makes it seem perverse of him also to have insisted on stating his view of the higher Christian life in terms of being perfect and not sinning.Unrealistic Theological Rationale:Wesley at least saw the experience of perfection uprooting and eradicating sinful desire from the heart. His understanding saw this not only as a change in the moral nature but as effecting some kind of a physical change as well. (see Packer 140-141) This thread of Wesley’s teaching has been picked up by such groups as the church of the Nazarene in its teaching of the eradication of the sin nature.Spiritual Elitism:The injection of a second work of grace into the Christian life also leads to a spiritual elitism on the part of those who have attained this “higher life.” There is a subtle tendency to look down patronizingly upon those who have not had this experience. (One of my former students at Simpson recently told me he was going to write an article entitled, “my life as a second class Christian”!)Dangers of Legalism:Particularly in the holiness groups, the Wesleyan concept of perfection as perfect love was exchanged for what Wesley called “high-strained” perfectionism which seeks the absolute perfection of God. To achieve this high standard, sin was redefined in terms of external acts and equated with cultural norms e.g. smoking, drinking, dancing, hair length, makeup, movies. Richard Lovelace speaks eloquently to this problem. . “. .. the conscience cannot accept sanctification unless it is based in a foundation in justification. When this is attempted the resulting insecurity creates a luxuriant overgrowth of religious flesh as believers seek to build a holiness formidable enough to pacify their consciences and quiet their sense of alienation from God. (The Dynamics of Spiritual Life, 104,) “The fully enlightened conscience cannot be pacified by any amount of grace inherent in our lives, since that always falls short of the perfection demanded by God’s law. . . such a conscience is forced to draw back into the relative darkness of self-deception. Either it manufactures a fictitious righteousness in heroic works of ascetic piety, or it redefines sin in shallow terms so that it can lose the consciousness of its presence.” (99)Problems With Exegesis:Wesley’s Scriptural proof of his doctrine (see above) consist of either promises and calls to holiness (with affirmations that God will indeed finally deliver his people from sin) or they are statements of accomplished deliverance which the believer possesses now. “Wesley affirms that the promises find fulfillment in total and absolute terms in this life and appeals to declarations, along with the prayers and commands, to buttress his conclusions.” (Packer, 139). In short he falls victim to a totally realized eschatology rather than seeing the tension of an “already but not yet” with reference to the Christian life.Protestations notwithstanding . . .Wesley in his own life did not rely upon justification for his acceptance before God. He looked to his state of Sanctification and there found that he was less than perfect. This caused him doubt of his salvation.On October 14, 1738 he wrote, “I cannot find in myself the love of God, or of Christ. Hence my deadness and wanderings in public prayer...Again: I find I have not that joy in the Holy Ghost.”On January 4, 1739 he wrote, “My friends affirm I am mad, because I said I was not a Christian a year ago. I affirm I am not a Christian now. Indeed, what I might have been I know not....Though I have constantly used all means of grace for twenty years, I am not a Christian.”On June 27, 1766 he wrote to Charles Wesley, “. . . and yet (this is the mystery) I do not love God. I never did. Therefore I never believed in the Christian sense of the word. Therefore I am only an honest heathen.”Comment by P.T. Forsythe :“It is a fatal mistake to think of holiness as a possession we have distinct from our faith and conferred upon it. That is a Catholic idea, still saturating Protestant Pietism. (see also Dieter, 14.)III. KeswickWith Keswick one finds a different situation than with the Holiness Movement. Whereas Wesleyan holiness theology is traceable directly to Wesley and has clearly identifiable tenets, Keswick is much more amorphous and comes in many varieties from the strict Keswick of a Major Ian Thomas, John Hunter, Alan Redpath and the Torchbearers fellowship to the milder Keswick of Campus Crusade For Christ and Moody Bible Institute and other respected Evangelical educational institutions. Whereas Holiness theology has tended to dominate in Arminian circles, Keswick has tended to dominate American Evangelicalism of a more Calvinistic bent. Indeed Packer asserts that it has become standard in virtually all of Evangelicalism except confessional Reformed and Lutheran.(151)A. Keswick OriginsIdeological roots: Holiness TheologyCharles Finney & Oberlin TheologyPhobe Palmer & Entire DevotionWilliam Boardman & The Higher Christian LifeHannah Whitehall Smith & The Christian Secret of a Happy LifeHistoric Origins:The term Keswick derives its name from a small community in the Lake district of England. In the wake of the Moody-Sankey campaigns there was an increased thirst for personal holiness and spiritual victory in the lives of many English Evangelicals. T. D. Harford-Battersby, vicar of Keswick was such a man. He had attended the Oxford meetings led by Robert Pearsall Smith and William Boardman 1874. (Bible.org) ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 63 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
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Wilderness Trek  A Novel of Australia, Grey, Zane
17 Grey, Zane Wilderness Trek A Novel of Australia
New York P.F. Collier and Son 1944 First Trade Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. "American cowboy, Stirling Haselton, taking the blame for a shooting committed by a friend, is exiled to Australia and with one loyal follower, joins a party of ranchers and drovers making the long wilderness journey to the Elaberleys. Along the way come dust storms, drought and numerous other adventures." Pearl Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American dentist and author best known for his popular adventure novels and stories associated with the Western genre in literature and the arts; he idealized the American frontier. Riders of the Purple Sage (1912) was his best-selling book. In addition to the commercial success of his printed works, they had second lives and continuing influence when adapted as films and television productions. His novels and short stories have been adapted into 112 films, two television episodes, and a television series, Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater. ; 304 pages 
Price: 12.97 USD
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18 Hammond Hammond Organ Service Manual for Models 13-a, a,ab, bc,bv,bcv,b2,b3,ba, c, cv, c2, c-2-g, c3, d, dv, g, gv, e, rt, rt-2, rt-3
Franklin Park, Il Hammond Organ Company 1940 PhotoCopy; First Impression Manila Folder or Binder Very Good with no dust jacket 
PHOTO COPY ONLY of service manual which includes sections 1-4 as described in title. Extra bonus section includes a copy of a parts list (section 6) for the b-3, c-3, PR-40, Early models unique parts list, and Early tone cabinets parts list. Some of the print may be faded and photos faded due to age and copying. Diagram and part locations are marked making this a very useful booklet. Rare. Possibly no publication date in item.; Photocopy Only; Diagrams, Photos 
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19 Hubbard, Barbara Burke The World According to Wavelets The Story of a Mathematical Technique in the Making
AK Peters 1997 1568810474 / 9781568810478 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 
0.75 x 9.5 x 6.5 Inches; 264 pages; Drawing on interviews with leading wavelet researchers in the USA and France, this book tells the story of the rise of the field. It attempts to make the subject accessible to the non-mathematical reader, without sacrificing precision. The material is organized so that the mathematical details can be assimilated at the reader's own pace. The main text is devoid of formulas and relates a story of people and ideas, while separate boxes and appendices contain intricate discussions for the more mathematically minded. 
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A White House diary, Johnson, Claudia Alta & Lady Bird Johnson
20 Johnson, Claudia Alta & Lady Bird Johnson A White House diary
Holt, Rinehart and Winston 1970 0030852544 / 9780030852541 First Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Inscribed on end paper :For M______ H_____ I hope you will enjoy sharing these years of not-s0-long ago, Lady Bird Johnson". Not a bookplate. Dust is not price clipped and has minor chips. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Book is clean and bright. Claudia Alta "Lady Bird" Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007) was First Lady of the United States (1963–69) during the presidency of her husband Lyndon B. Johnson.Notably well educated for her time, she proved a capable manager and a shrewd investor. After marrying LBJ in 1934, when he was a political hopeful in Austin, Texas, she used a modest inheritance to bankroll his congressional campaign, and then ran his office while he was serving in the navy. Next, she bought a radio station and then a TV station, which would soon make them millionaires. As First Lady, she broke new ground by interacting directly with Congress, employing her own press secretary, and making a solo electioneering tour. Rare in this condition. ; 9.10 X 6.90 X 2.20 inches; 806 pages 
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