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The Sabbath of Life, Addington, Richard D.
1 Addington, Richard D. The Sabbath of Life
New York, NY American News Company 1868 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Brown cover with gold lettering. "Dead to Self" is engraved on front cover. Cover shows extreme wear especially at extremities. Bottom of pages at spine are very worn. Pages yellowing due to age. This author seems to be anti-establishment (anti-secterian) when it comes to organized church. He quotes Madam Guyon and others. Contents clean. Rare.; 1868 
Price: 99.97 USD
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Speak Ill of the Living  (Author Signed), Arsenault, Mark
2 Arsenault, Mark Speak Ill of the Living (Author Signed)
Scottsdale, AZ Poisoned Pen Press 2005 1590581393 / 9781590581391 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed. Beautiful book. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Shamus Award Nominee. Everybody thought the banker surprised by car-jackers was dead and buried until a photograph of him taken by his captors turns up. If the banker is alive, then whose ashes are buried in his grave? Eddie's chase after the story takes him across many neighborhoods of his home and crime beat, Lowell, Massachusetts, and deep into his own famiy's dark secrets. What he hears are the echoes of a forgotten crime. What he finds are bodies blocking his path.... Someone is killing off his sources. High tension, dark doings, and a real surprise mark this exciting novel. Rare. ; 1.02 x 8.66 x 5.59 Inches; 256 pages; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 19.97 USD
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The Devil's Own Rag Doll  (Author Signed), Bartoy, Mitchell
3 Bartoy, Mitchell The Devil's Own Rag Doll (Author Signed)
St. Martin's Minotaur 2005 0312340885 / 9780312340889 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by author on title page. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover.1940+s Detroit: the war effort is in full swing and racial tensions are running high. When a vivacious white heiress is murdered in the black part of town, the city threatens to erupt into mob violence, bringing the factories to a grinding halt and imperiling Allied forces around the world. Newly minted Detective Pete Caudill is charged with covering up the crime in the interests of civic peace and finding some kind of justice for the dead girl. Odds are the girl was killed by her black boyfriend, but some whisper of a communist plot. Or is Detroit+s shadowy political machine manipulating events to its own ruthless ends? As he delves deeper, Caudill soon learns the hard way that friends are rarely what they seem, family ties are often deceptive, and sometimes the bravest thing a man can do is think for himself. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. ; 1.2 x 8.4 x 5.6 Inches; 304 pages; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 12.97 USD
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Western Wilds and the Men Who Redeem Them, An Authentic Narrative, Beadle, J.H.
4 Beadle, J.H. Western Wilds and the Men Who Redeem Them, An Authentic Narrative
Cincinnati, Oh Jones Brothers & Company 1879 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Rebound with 1/4 leather and gold lettering. Marbled endpapers. Clean contents. Chapters include, among others: The Journey to Utah, The Hawkeyes, Geffroy's Trials, Polygamia, The Missouri Valley, Among the Aztecs, The Fair Apostae, Minnesota, The Mormon Murders, The Nobel Red Man, The dead Prophet, Where shall we settle. Beautiful book. Scarce.; Illustrations, Drawings; p 
Price: 159.97 USD
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5 Black, Rev. E. W. Where Are The Dead?
Syracuse, NY The Wesleyan Methodist Publishing House ca 1948 Fourth Edition; Various Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Brown cover with black print. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. Scarce. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo; 46 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Dead or Alive, Clancy, Tom & Grant Blackwood
6 Clancy, Tom & Grant Blackwood Dead or Alive
Putnam Adult 2010 0399157239 / 9780399157233 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover For years, Jack Ryan, Jr. and his colleagues at the Campus have waged an unofficial and highly effective campaign against the terrorists who threaten western civilization. The most dangerous of these is the Emir. This sadistic killer has masterminded the most vicious attacks on the west and has eluded capture by the world’s law enforcement agencies. Now the Campus is on his trail. Joined by their latest recruits, John Clark and Ding Chavez, Jack Ryan, Jr. and his cousins, Dominick and Brian Caruso, are determined to catch the Emir and they will bring him in . . . dead or alive.; 9.13 X 6.06 X 2.60 inches; 848 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 59.97 USD
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Sharpe's Triumph Richard Sharpe and the BAttle of Assaye, September 1803, Cornwell, Bernard
7 Cornwell, Bernard Sharpe's Triumph Richard Sharpe and the BAttle of Assaye, September 1803
London Harper Collins 1998 0002256304 / 9780002256308 1st UK; 1st Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
This is not an exlibrary, does not have price clipped, and is in excellent condition. Very clean contents, probably read only once. Now in mylar archival dust cover to preserve condition. Has slight tilt. With the return of the brave English sergeant Richard Sharpe--here, to battle the mercenary forces of the Mahratta confederation in India in 1803--Bernard Cornwell claims his rightful place alongside Patrick O'Brian as a contemporary master of historical narrative. Sharpe's Triumph is a riveting story of betrayal and revenge that showcases the deft blend of suspenseful military adventure and sweeping historical detail that has made each new installment of the Richard Sharpe series a number one bestseller in Great Britain and around the world. In the four years since he earned his sergeant's stripes at the bloody siege of Seringapatam, young Richard Sharpe has lead a peaceful existence. But this relatively easy life meets with a brutal end when he is the sole survivor of a murderous attack at the hands of Major William Dodd, a cold-blooded English officer who has defected from the East India Company to join the mercenary forces of the Mahratta confederation.Sharpe rises from the killing field at Fort Chasalgaon vowing to avenge his dead comrades, even if it means pursuing the turncoat Dodd to the very ends of the continent. It is a quest that takes him deep into the heart of enemy territory, where the accepted rules of engagement have been discarded, where ever-shifting loyalties create an environment of dangerous uncertainty, forcing Sharpe to guard against attacks from enemy and friend.The paths of treachery ultimately lead to the small village of Assaye, where Sharpe's company joins the army of Sir Arthur Wellesley--the future Duke of Wellington--to take on the Mahratta horde. Outnumbered and outgunned, Wellesley bravely seizes an unexpected geographical advantage and charges into the white heat of a battle that will make his reputation. It is a bloody confrontation that will make Sharpe's name, too--but first he must survive the carnage and live to tell the tale of what will be remembered as one of the greatest battles of its century. May have minor dust spotting on top edge from shelf storage over time otherwise as new condition.; 400 pages 
Price: 17.97 USD
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8 Daniels, E.J. A MESSAGE FROM THE DEAD
Christ for the World Pub. 1961 Various Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
We provide delivery tracking to all US orders. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book. 
Price: 5.97 USD
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Where Are the Dead?, Didier, Ralph
9 Didier, Ralph Where Are the Dead?
St Louis, MO Faithful Words Publishing Co. 1932 First Edition; Various Pamphlet Good with no dust jacket 
Pamphlet torn. A sermon preached by Dider on April 4, 1932 in Laeer, Michigan. This pamphlet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. ; 18mo; 3 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Cold and Pure and Very Dead  A Karen Pelletier Mystery  (Author Signed), Dobson, Joanne
10 Dobson, Joanne Cold and Pure and Very Dead A Karen Pelletier Mystery (Author Signed)
New York, NY Doubleday 2000 0385493401 / 9780385493406 Stated First Edition; First Printing Hardcover As New in Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
As new condition. Signed by author on title page. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover. Dust not priced clipped. English professor Karen Pelletier is well known for her provocative manner and iconoclastic opinions, so it's no surprise that, when asked to name the Greatest Book of the Twentieth Century, she perversely cites a commercial blockbuster from the 1950s. A reprint version of Oblivion Falls, the only novel by Mildred Deakin who disappeared shortly after its publication, quickly becomes the hottest book around, an Oprah's Book Club selection and a New York Times bestseller.At the height of the media frenzy, a reporter who discovers the reclusive author on a goat farm in upstate New York, is found dead in her driveway. Would the once-notorious Milly Deakin shoot to kill in order to protect her privacy? The intrepid Professor Pelletier deploys all her literary and investigative skills to exonerate the now-embattled older woman and restore her hard-won peace. ; 0.97 x 9.55 x 6.4 Inches; 272 pages; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 12.97 USD
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Brain Dead  (Author Signed), Dreyer, Eileen
11 Dreyer, Eileen Brain Dead (Author Signed)
New York , NY Harper Collins 1997 0061010952 / 9780061010958 First Edition; Third Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed by author. Dust jacket in mylar protective cover. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 406 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 8.97 USD
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Organization of Camps in the United Confederate Veterans, June, 1909 Prepared expressly for the use of delegates, Evans, Clement A.
12 Evans, Clement A. Organization of Camps in the United Confederate Veterans, June, 1909 Prepared expressly for the use of delegates
J.G. Hauser, New Orleans 1909 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Fair with no dust jacket 
Grey paper cover with blue ink. Has colored Confederate flag on front. Chips and tears to cover. Contains a listing those admitted to the Fellowship of the United Confederate Veterans with Numbers, Headquarters, and Names of Present Commanders and Adjutants. Also has laid in a listing of all Camps with respective number assigned to that camp and city and state of camp. Additionally their is a laid in Report of Maj.-Gen William E. Mickle, Chief of Staff to Gen. Clement A. Evans, Commander in chief, U.C.V. dated June 5th, 1909 containing "A brief summary of matters connected with his office during twelv months". Includes a section entitled Our Dead listing those who died within the past year of the camp. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Rare. ; Reunion and meeting of the Association; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall 
Price: 79.97 USD
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Straight  (Author Signed), Francis, Dick
13 Francis, Dick Straight (Author Signed)
Putnam 1989 0399134700 / 9780399134708 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed by Author "Bill and Debbie, Hi. Dick Francis". Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book.Ex-jockey, Derek Franklin, inherits his brother's jewellery business, mistress and some shadowy business associates. When expensive diamonds go missing, his only hope of survival is to identify his brother's enemies. From the author of "The Edge" and "Odds Against".From the authors obit: Richard Stanley Francis, jockey and writer, born 31 October 1920; died 14 February 2010. Dick Francis, who has died aged 89, was a unique figure, a champion steeplechase jockey who, without any previous apparent literary bent, became an international bestselling writer, the author of 42 crime novels, selling more than 60m copies in 35 languages. Right from the start, with Dead Cert in 1962, the Dick Francis thriller showed a mastery of lean, witty genre prose reminiscent – sometimes to the point of comic parody – of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett. It was an American style that many clever people in England had attempted to reproduce without much success, and it was a wonder how a barely educated former jump jockey was able to do the trick with such effortless ease. People said his highly educated wife wrote the books for him. It was a mystery that was never satisfactorily solved. However, After his wifes death in 2000, when no new crime novels appeared, it looked as if Mary might have written them. But then, six years later, Francis came out of retirement to produce Under Orders, which had all the old Francis flavour. The next year, 2007, he published Dead Heat, then Silks (2008) and Even Money (2009).The most dramatic incident in his racing career was also a mystery. In the Grand National at Aintree in 1956, his mount Devon Loch, the Queen Mother's horse trained by Peter Cazalet, had jumped all the fences and, well ahead, only 50 yards from the finish, without another horse near him, suddenly collapsed and was unable to continue. The plots (of Francis' books, too, ran to a formula. Some reviewers protested that racing could not be as crooked as depicted in the Francis novels, but real life (as in the case of the Shergar kidnapping) came in to prove how realistic his stories were. Born at Coedcanlas Farm in the Pembrokeshire village of Lawrenny, Francis came from a line of farming gentry and horsemen. His father was a show rider and manager of hunting stables, his grandfather a farmer and gentleman jockey. Uncles on both sides of his family were Masters of Foxhounds. The family home was a beautiful old farmhouse but it had neither gas nor electricity and was lit by candlelight. As well as the thrillers, he wrote his autobiography, The Sport of Queens (1957), and Lester (1986), a biography of Lester Piggott.. From the authors obit: Richard Stanley Francis, jockey and writer, born 31 October 1920; died 14 February 2010. Dick Francis, who has died aged 89, was a unique figure, a champion steeplechase jockey who, without any previous apparent literary bent, became an international bestselling writer, the author of 42 crime novels, selling more than 60m copies in 35 languages. Right from the start, with Dead Cert in 1962, the Dick Francis thriller showed a mastery of lean, witty genre prose reminiscent – sometimes to the point of comic parody – of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett. It was an American style that many clever people in England had attempted to reproduce without much success, and it was a wonder how a barely educated former jump jockey was able to do the trick with such effortless ease. People said his highly educated wife wrote the books for him. It was a mystery that was never satisfactorily solved. However, After his wifes death in 2000, when no new crime novels appeared, it looked as if Mary might have written them. But then, six years later, Francis came out of retirement to produce Under Orders, which had all the old Francis flavour. The next year, 2007, he published Dead Heat, then Silks (2008) and Even Money (2009).The most dramatic incident in his racing career was also a mystery. In the Grand National at Aintree in 1956, his mount Devon Loch, the Queen Mother's horse trained by Peter Cazalet, had jumped all the fences and, well ahead, only 50 yards from the finish, without another horse near him, suddenly collapsed and was unable to continue. The plots (of Francis' books, too, ran to a formula. Some reviewers protested that racing could not be as crooked as depicted in the Francis novels, but real life (as in the case of the Shergar kidnapping) came in to prove how realistic his stories were. Born at Coedcanlas Farm in the Pembrokeshire village of Lawrenny, Francis came from a line of farming gentry and horsemen. His father was a show rider and manager of hunting stables, his grandfather a farmer and gentleman jockey. Uncles on both sides of his family were Masters of Foxhounds. The family home was a beautiful old farmhouse but it had neither gas nor electricity and was lit by candlelight. As well as the thrillers, he wrote his autobiography, The Sport of Queens (1957), and Lester (1986), a biography of Lester Piggott.; 1.6 x 9.3 x 6.3 Inches; 323 pages; Ex-jockey, Derek Franklin, inherits his brother's jewellery business, mistress and some shadowy business associates. When expensive diamonds go missing, his only hope of survival is to identify his brother's enemies. From the author of "The Edge" and "Odds Against".; Signed by Author 
Price: 29.97 USD
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DEAD MEN TELL TALES Some Archaeological Fragments, Funkhouser, W. D.
14 Funkhouser, W. D. DEAD MEN TELL TALES Some Archaeological Fragments
Lexington, KY Published By Author 1944 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 

Price: 18.97 USD
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Where Are the Dead?, Godbey, W.B.
15 Godbey, W.B. Where Are the Dead?
Nashville, Tenn Pentecostal Mission Pub. Co. N.D. 1st Thus; Various Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Rare booklet by this famous holiness preacher. May have chips and yellowing. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo; 49 pages 
Price: 47.97 USD
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Where Are the Dead?, Godbey, W.B.
16 Godbey, W.B. Where Are the Dead?
Nashville, Tenn Pentecostal Mission Pub. Co. ca 1900 1st Thus; Various Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Rare booklet by this famous holiness preacher. May have chips and yellowing. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo; 49 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
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Hitler's Niece  A Novel, Hansen, Ron
17 Hansen, Ron Hitler's Niece A Novel
HarperCollins 1999 0060194197 / 9780060194192 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by Author on Title Page. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. In September 1931, a 23-year-old woman was found dead in the Munich flat owned by Adolf Hitler, an unfinished letter on her desk and his handgun on the floor beside her. She was Geli Raubal, the daughter of Hitler's widowed half-sister, and, as Hitler later melodramatically claimed, the only woman he ever loved. Although he had known of Geli since her birth, he was aloof from his Austrian family during his first years as head of the struggling Nazi Party. But in 1927, six years before he became chancellor, Hitler invited his half-sister to become housekeeper of his alpine home in Obersalzberg and to bring along her daughter, offering to pay for Geli's medical studies at the university in Munich. Seeing his niece on a daily basis, he soon fell jealously in love, for Geli was, as Hitler's friends later said, "an enchantress," pretty, fun-loving, witty, flirtatious, and able, as no one else was, to put her strange, high-strung uncle at ease. In a carefully researched historical novel that is haunting, unflinching, shocking, profound, and as compulsively readable as a psychological thriller, Ron Hansen presents Adolf Hitler as he has never before been seen in fiction, but as his intimates must have seen him. And through the eyes of a favorite niece who has been all but lost to history, we see the frightening rise in prestige and political power of a vain, vulgar, sinister man who thrived on hate and cruelty and would stop at nothing to keep the horror of his inner life hidden from the world. Hitler's Niece is a masterpiece, a luminous, suspenseful, beautifully crafted novel, full of passion, events, and insight, that reinforces Ron Hansen's growing reputation as one of our foremost writers of fiction. ; (Author Signed); 1.3 x 9.6 x 6.4 Inches; 320 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 14.97 USD
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Addresses on the Gospel of John, Ironside, H. A
18 Ironside, H. A Addresses on the Gospel of John
Loizeaux Bros 1950 First Edition; Fourth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.In 1930, Wheaton College presented Ironside with an honorary Doctorate of Letters degree, and in 1942-06-03 Bob Jones University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.[3].Bob Jones, Jr., wrote that although Ironside was considered a dignified man, when one got to know him, "he had a terrific sense of humor. Nothing was more fun than to have a good meal in a home somewhere when Dr. Ironside was present. After he was full--he could eat a lot, and he ate faster than any man I ever saw, and his plate would be empty before everyone else got served--he would sit back, push his chair back from the table, and begin to tell funny stories and personal experiences."[4]A few months after he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, Helen died on May 1, 1948. Ironside resigned as pastor of Moody Church on May 30 and retired to Winona Lake, Indiana. On October 9, 1949, he married Annie Turner Hightower, of Thomaston, Georgia, who became his constant companion. He suffered from failing vision, and after surgery to restore it, he set out on November 2, 1950, for a preaching tour of New Zealand, once more among Brethren assemblies, but died in Cambridge, New Zealand, on Jan 15, 1951 and was buried there.; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 723 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Addresses on the Gospel of Luke, Ironside, H. A
19 Ironside, H. A Addresses on the Gospel of Luke
Loizeaux Bros 1946 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.In 1930, Wheaton College presented Ironside with an honorary Doctorate of Letters degree, and in 1942-06-03 Bob Jones University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.[3].Bob Jones, Jr., wrote that although Ironside was considered a dignified man, when one got to know him, "he had a terrific sense of humor. Nothing was more fun than to have a good meal in a home somewhere when Dr. Ironside was present. After he was full--he could eat a lot, and he ate faster than any man I ever saw, and his plate would be empty before everyone else got served--he would sit back, push his chair back from the table, and begin to tell funny stories and personal experiences."[4]A few months after he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, Helen died on May 1, 1948. Ironside resigned as pastor of Moody Church on May 30 and retired to Winona Lake, Indiana. On October 9, 1949, he married Annie Turner Hightower, of Thomaston, Georgia, who became his constant companion. He suffered from failing vision, and after surgery to restore it, he set out on November 2, 1950, for a preaching tour of New Zealand, once more among Brethren assemblies, but died in Cambridge, New Zealand, on Jan 15, 1951 and was buried there.; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 723 pages 
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Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, Ironside, H. A
20 Ironside, H. A Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet
Neptune City, NJ Loizeaux Bros 1968 Second Edition; Twentieth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust in excellent condition and covered in mylar cover.. Has fold out chart. Former owners name in front. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; Lectures on Daniel the Prophet; 12mo 7" - 7˝" tall; 253 pages 
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