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One Man's Family  The Life of Hiram Vasquez 1843-1939, Albright, Zella Rae
1 Albright, Zella Rae One Man's Family The Life of Hiram Vasquez 1843-1939
self 1984 Limited Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Limited edition Number 215 of 1000. Rust cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips now in mylar for protection. Rare signed copy. Traces this famous family from living with the Shoshone indians, to Ft. Bridger, Salt Lake City, Missouri, Colorado, Sincian, etc. Frustrations on the Wahatoya, as storekeeper, sawmiller, marshal, timber company owner. Extensive bibliograpy and index. Many surnames used throughout along with historical accounts. Wonderful reference and great read. Rare signed copy. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 362 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 29.97 USD
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Speak Ill of the Living  (Author Signed), Arsenault, Mark
2 Arsenault, Mark Speak Ill of the Living (Author Signed)
Scottsdale, AZ Poisoned Pen Press 2005 1590581393 / 9781590581391 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed. Beautiful book. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Shamus Award Nominee. Everybody thought the banker surprised by car-jackers was dead and buried until a photograph of him taken by his captors turns up. If the banker is alive, then whose ashes are buried in his grave? Eddie's chase after the story takes him across many neighborhoods of his home and crime beat, Lowell, Massachusetts, and deep into his own famiy's dark secrets. What he hears are the echoes of a forgotten crime. What he finds are bodies blocking his path.... Someone is killing off his sources. High tension, dark doings, and a real surprise mark this exciting novel. Rare. ; 1.02 x 8.66 x 5.59 Inches; 256 pages; p; Signed by Author 
Price: 19.97 USD
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3 Atcheson, Wayne Faith of the Crimson Tide Inspiring Alabama Sports Stories of Faith
Cross Training Publishing 2000 1929478224 / 9781929478224 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Signed by author on end paper. Subtitle: Inspiring Alabama Sports Stories of Faith

This book features moving stories of faith from Alabama athletes, coaches and staff. These (sometimes humours) stories are taken from events with Crimson Tide athletics; from events during games, practices and in the locker room. They deal with a variety of spiritual issues like role models, adversity, illness, tragedy, hardship, decision-making, forgiveness, death, patience and love. Featuring stories from: Shaun Alexander, Coach Ronnie Cottrell, Coach Mike DuBose, Tommy Ford, Chad & Leah Goss, Coach Mark Gottfried, Coach Charlie Harbison, Coach Ellis Johnson, Kermit Koenig, Bill McDonald, Coach Rick Moody, Coach Betty Palmer, Coach David Patterson, Ryan Pflugner, Andy Phillips, John David Phillips, Coach Robert Scott, Coach Dick Spybey, Kevn Stephen, and Coach Jim Wells. ; 1.06 x 8.86 x 5.94 Inches; 288 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 18.97 USD

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4 Brittingham, Alvin and Joseph The First Trading Post At Kicotan Hampton, Virginia A description of the excavation work, with map and photographs of some of the ... for trading with the Indians prior to 1610
Hampton, VA Franklin Printing Co. 1947 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Fine with no dust jacket 
Blue booklet. Kicotan (Kecoughtan) Photos, Rare work concerning the first trading post establised by the Virginia colonists for trade with the indians in 1610. Kecoughtan in Virginia was originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kiccowtan, Kikowtan etc.), the name of the Algonquian Native Americans living there when the English colonists arrived in the Hampton Roads area in 1607.; Photographs, Maps; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 23 pages; 
Price: 17.97 USD
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Dawn Land   (Author Signed, Bruchac, Joseph
5 Bruchac, Joseph Dawn Land (Author Signed
Golden, CO Fulcrum Publishing 1993 155591134X / 9781555911348 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed, "For Carol, Joseph Bruchac". Excellent condition. Bruchac ( Native American Stories ) draws on an imaginative mix of Native American tradition and historical facts to craft this lyrical first novel, set about 10,000 years ago in the area now known as New England and the maritime provinces of Canada. As the Ice Age recedes, the People of the Dawn Land (the Abenaki) enjoy an idyllic existence, with people in 13 villages living in harmony with one another and with all creation. Their loyal dogs have an almost telepathic link to their human keepers. Then a mysterious threat darkens the horizon. Have the Cannibal Giants returned? The heroic Young Hunter is dispatched on a desperate, dangerous journey to meet the enemy, and takes with him a new technology, the bow. Fluidly and to poetic effect, Bruchac incorporates tales from the oral traditions of the Abenaki and other Northeastern tribes. ; 0.75 x 8.5 x 5.75 Inches; 332 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 11.97 USD
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BARBARA BUSH (Author Signed)  A Memoir, Bush, Barbara
6 Bush, Barbara BARBARA BUSH (Author Signed) A Memoir
New York , NY Charles Scribners Sons 1994 0025196359 / 9780025196353 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Violet cover. Dust not price clipped. Original signature on bookplate in addition to machine signature. Very clean almost new condition. Mrs. Bush was an engaging women that through adversity and trial will be remembered for her strength and poise. After her husband (President George H.W. Bush) finished his presidency she became a well known speaker and advoate for literacy. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover. Rare signed copy.; Photos; 1.9 x 9.56 x 6.52 Inches; 512 pages;

Barbara Bush is certainly among the most popular First Ladies ever to live in the White House. Politics aside, people worldwide have come to admire her wit, her candor and compassion, as well as her unswerving devotion to her husband and children.

In her memoir, Mrs. Bush for the first time gives readers a very private look at a life lived in the public eye for more than twenty-five years. She begins with a compelling portrait of her early years, including: growing up in Rye, New York, and meeting George Bush; life as a young bride and mother, moving far away from home to West Texas; and the almost unbearable pain of losing a child.

With contemporary American history as the backdrop, Mrs. Bush remembers the shock of learning that her fiancé has been shot down in the Pacific during World War II; the disbelief when a black friend is refused service in a Southern restaurant in the 1950s; and the fear when she is caught in the middle of a student protest march in the 1960s.

She recounts her years in public life, from first moving to Washington when George Bush was elected to Congress; to her experience living in New York as the wife of the Ambassador to the United Nations and in China as wife of the U.S. envoy. She talks candidly about the ups and downs of three presidential campaigns and describes her role as the wife of the Vice President, culminating in the climactic White House years.

Drawing upon excerpts from her diary, which she has compiled for more than thirty years, Mrs. Bush takes us behind the scenes of the Persian Gulf conflict and the end of the Cold War. She talks about both the Bushes' struggle to overcome Graves' disease and how she faced the controversy that erupted at Wellesley College before her commencement speech.

Through the friendships she developed over the years with world leaders and their spouses, we meet and get to know the Gorbachevs, the Thatchers, the Mitterrands, the Mubaraks, and many others. And she tells us why she threw so much of her energy and compassion behind the important cause of making more Americans literate.

This memoir includes hundreds of the funny, often self-deprecating, and occasionally touching anecdotes for which Mrs. Bush is well known: surprising a rat while swimming in the White House pool; accidentally stomping on Boris Yeltsin's foot under the table during a state dinner; wearing a $29 pair of shoes for her husband's inaugural ball.

She also talks about the disappointments of the 1992 presidential campaign and the joys of rediscovering private life, including driving and cooking again for the first time in twelve years.

This is a warm and funny memoir that will charm Mrs. Bush's millions of admirers and earn her many more.; Signed by Author 
Price: 399.97 USD

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What will he do with it?, Caxton, Pisistratus, Sir E. Bulwer Lytton Bart
7 Caxton, Pisistratus, Sir E. Bulwer Lytton Bart What will he do with it?
New York, NY Harper & Brothers, Publishers 1861 Later Printing; First Edition Hardcover Fair with No dust jacket as issued 
Leather binding has wear at edges and corners with chips to top and bottom of spine. Contents show browning to pages due to age. Contains books 1-12 which seems to be the total book in one volume. Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton PC, was an English novelist, poet, playwright, and politician. Born: May 25, 1803, London, United Kingdom. Lytton was a florid, popular writer of his day, who coined such phrases as "the great unwashed", "pursuit of the almighty dollar", "the pen is mightier than the sword", and the infamous incipit "It was a dark and stormy night."He was the youngest son of General William Earle Bulwer of Heydon Hall and Wood Dalling, Norfolk and Elizabeth Barbara Lytton, daughter of Richard Warburton Lytton of Knebworth, Hertfordshire. He had two brothers, William Earle Lytton Bulwer (1799–1877) and Henry, afterwards Lord Dalling and Bulwer. Lord Lytton's original surname was Bulwer, the names 'Earle' and 'Lytton' were middle names. On 20 February 1844 he assumed the name and arms of Lytton by royal licence and his surname then became 'Bulwer-Lytton'. His widowed mother had done the same in 1811. His brothers were always simply surnamed 'Bulwer'. Died: January 18, 1873, Torquay, United KingdomAwards: Chancellor's Gold Medal. .....The opening chapters really compel one into reading on and on when Bulwer-Lytton unfolds the story of the angelic little Sophy and her grandfather, who is known as Gentleman Waife and who is forced to earn his living as an actor and to make his grandchild, too, appear on the stage amidst a group of itinerant actors under the guidance of the tyrannic Lorenzo Rugge. The yarn itself is brilliant and compelling, and the main motif is the difference between a man who sacrificed everything in order to keep his family’s good name unsullied and another who sacrificed his own name in order to give somebody he loves another chance. First was published in 1859 so this may be a second? ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 311 pages 
Price: 49.97 USD
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Red Rabbit, Clancy, Tom
8 Clancy, Tom Red Rabbit
Putnam Adult 2002 0399148701 / 9780399148705 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover . Long before he was President or head of the CIA, before he fought terrorist attacks on the Super Bowl or the White House, even before a submarine named Red October made its perilous way across the Atlantic, Jack Ryan was an historian, teacher, and recent ex-Marine temporarily living in England while researching a book. A series of deadly encounters with an IRA splinter group had brought him to the attention of the CIA's Deputy Director, Vice Admiral James Greer—as well as his counterpart with the British SIS, Sir Basil Charleston—and when Greer asked him if he wanted to come aboard as a freelance analyst, Jack was quick to accept. The opportunity was irresistible, and he was sure he could fit it in with the rest of his work. ; 9.21 X 5.98 X 1.89 inches; 640 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 99.97 USD
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Where the Swallowtail Kite Soars  The Legacies of Glades County, Florida and The Vanishing Wilderness, Dale, Nancy
9 Dale, Nancy Where the Swallowtail Kite Soars The Legacies of Glades County, Florida and The Vanishing Wilderness
iUniverse, Inc. 2004 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Near Fine with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Bok looks new. Very Rare Author inscribed poem in front along with Authors Signature. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. "May you walk with a gentle breeze upon your face- May you wake to the beauty of a lavender sky- May you sleep under a blanket of stars- In Florida Last pristine wilderness- Nancy Dale. Looks new. Palmdale, a remote town in Glades County, population less than 1,000, is on the curb of creeping urbanization. Today, more people than Palmdale's entire population are moving into Florida each day. The pioneer culture and Florida's last wilderness is threatened by growth that exploits "blue gold" water and the land. The sprawling ranches set amidst tall cabbage palm prairies are disappearing. The cost to stay is more than the price to sell with high inheritance taxes and the evaporation of a cattle based economy. The early pioneers forecasted Florida's future in their own lifetime as they struggled to hold onto a way of life in a place where few chose to carve a living.

Their stories predict the high premium of development: light pollution, traffic, sewage, crime and the "napalming" of native trees replaced by "ornamental" shrubs, cement, and gated communities. They foresaw the destruction of natural eco-systems, water shortages and communities where wildlife extermination businesses spring up to destroy "pesky" intruders such as squirrels, woodpeckers, snakes and other Everglades species.

The story of Palmdale, Florida, and its people reflects a proud cultural heritage living on the edge of civilization. Palmdale is a ghost town today with only a few ranches left and the Seminole Indian Tribe living off a small market economy against the odds of metropolitan growth, dollars and political power.This story reflects a tragic national trend threatening the survival of rural America. ; 0.5 x 8.8 x 6 Inches; 180 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 19.19 USD

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Post War Letter to H.N. Comey (Civil War Captain) Verification of information Comey included in article about Dodge in Danvers , MA. Historical Collection (Book signed by Comey and Letter signed by Dodge included), Dodge, Grenville M. (Civil War General)
10 Dodge, Grenville M. (Civil War General) Post War Letter to H.N. Comey (Civil War Captain) Verification of information Comey included in article about Dodge in Danvers , MA. Historical Collection (Book signed by Comey and Letter signed by Dodge included)
Bristol, Ct Author 1914 First Edition; First Edition Ephemera Very Good Signed by Author
Letter is part of a two part offering that includes a signed copy of the Danvers (MA) Historical Collection Vol. II signed by Captain Comey. Comey wrote an article entitled "General Grenville M. Dodge, Danvers' Most Distinguished Living Son". The article follows the career of Dodge who was a General under General Sherman in the Civil War and then went on to design the route and build the Transcontinental Railroad. Dodge is confirming the information that Comey was to include in the article and also sent a donation of $100 to the Historical Society. Letter has handwritten note by Gen. Dodge in corner about the donation. There are two ink spots on letter and creases from being folded and placed in the book. The stationary for the letter has Baldwin Block, Council Bluffs, Iowa where General Dodge moved after completing the Transcontiential Railroad. Under Sherman General Dodge as an engineer built and rebuilt many roads and bridges to enable Sherman and his troops to move rapidly to the front lines. Rare items. ; 8 1/2 x 11; 1 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 899.97 USD
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Post War Letter to H.N. Comey (Civil War Captain), verifying information Comey included in article about General Dodge in Historical Collection book about  Danvers, MA. Book is from the Historical Collection.  (Author Signed), Dodge, Grenville M. , Comey H.N.
11 Dodge, Grenville M. , Comey H.N. Post War Letter to H.N. Comey (Civil War Captain), verifying information Comey included in article about General Dodge in Historical Collection book about Danvers, MA. Book is from the Historical Collection. (Author Signed)
Author 1914 First Edition; First Printing Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Letter part of a two part offering that includes a signed copy of the Danvers (MA) Historical Collection boo, Vol II that is signed by Captain H.N. Comey. Comey warte an article entitled "General Grenville M. Dodge, Danvers' Most Distinguished Living Son". The article follows the career of Dodge who was a Civil War General under General Sherman. Dodge then went on to design the route and build the Transcontinental Railroad. Dodge is confirming the information that Comey was to include in the article and also sent Comey a donation of $100 to the Historical Society. Letter has a handwritten note by Gen. Dodge in corner about the donation. There are two ink spots on letter and creases from being folded and placed in the book. The stationary for the letter has "Baldwin Block, Council Bluffs, Iowa" where General Dodge moved after completing the Transcontiential RR. Under Sherman General Dodge as engineer built and rebuilt many roads and bridges to enable Sherman and his troops to move rapidly to the front lines. Rare unique items. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; Signed by All Authors 
Price: 879.97 USD
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Special report on the subject of pensions at the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors Home, Force, M. F
12 Force, M. F Special report on the subject of pensions at the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors Home
Sandusky, Ohio Sandusky, OH 1896 First Edition Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Minutes of the Board November 25, 1896 requesting an investigation as to the feasibility and propriety of requiring all pensioners of the home to pay part of their pension to the state.... 8 pages. Imprint. Excellent condition. In 1886, a group of citizens led by I. F. Mack of Sandusky successfully petitioned the state legislature to establish a home for Ohio's honorably discharged Civil War veterans who, because of incapacitating disease, wounds, or other cause, were unable to earn a living. Governor J. B. Foraker appointed a commission charged with the duty of selecting a site and arranging for construction of the home. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Rare.; 8 pages; Missing as of 12/06 
Price: 14.97 USD
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Keswickism, Godbey, W.B.
13 Godbey, W.B. Keswickism
Louisville, KY Pentecostal Publishing Co. ca 1900 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
Booklet's cover is detached and has chips. Contents complete. Rare work by Godbey on Keswickism. Rare if not unique. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. Booklet Possibly no publication date in item. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life. Wesleyan and Keswick Models of SanctificationRelated MediaI. IntroductionMuch of contemporary Evangelicalism is indebted in some way to John Wesley and his theological understanding of the Christian Life, or Sanctification. Wesleyanism, various varieties of Holiness Theologies, Keswick, Deeper Life, Higher life, Victorious Life Theologies all have their root in Wesley’s teaching concerning the Christian life.II. Wesley and WesleyanismA. Wesley & SanctificationIn the theology of John Wesley one finds a new direction, distinct both from Reformed and classic Arminianism Wesley built his understanding of the nature of man solidly upon the Reformed position of original sin, and the subsequent necessity of divine grace for salvation. Here however he parted company with the reformers and injected the doctrine of prevenient grace, (all men have received of the Holy Spirit the ability to respond to God) into his understanding of the doctrine of salvation. Wesley rejected the Reformed concept of election , opting instead for the Arminian concept of conditional election. Thus he joined the Reformed doctrine of the total sinfulness of the individual and the primacy of grace with the Arminian stress on human freedom, with its subsequent moral obligations. But his doctrine of Sanctification was not traditional Arminianism Wesley was also heavily influenced by the mystics. Packer has observed that he superimposed“on the Augustinianism of the Anglican prayer book and the heaven aspiring High Church moralist in which he was reared a concept of perfection . . . that he had learned from the Greek Patristic sources. “Macarius the Egyptian” . . . and Ephraem Syrus were chief among these. There idea of perfection was not of sinlessness, but of an ever deepening process of all around moral change. To this idea Wesley then added the lesson he had learned form those whom he called the “mystic writers” (a category including the Anglican William Law, the Roman Catholics Molinos, Fenelon, Gaston de Renty, Francis de Sales, and Madame Guyon, the Lutheran Pietist Francke, and the pre-reformation Theologia Gremanica) The lesson was that the heart of true godliness is a motivating spirit of love to God and man; without this all religion is hollow and empty. (Keep In Step with the Spirit,134)Wesley asserted the primacy of justification, and the assurance the believer could have based upon the righteousness of Christ. However, his Arminian view of election creeps into his view of final salvation. He views the process of Sanctification as one of making the individual worthy of salvation. This process is a work of God, but it is also a work of man. At this point a synergism appears. At one point he explicitly states that good works are a condition of final justification which he regards as necessary for final salvation (Lindstrom, 207)B. Developments within WesleyanismAs Wesleyanism took root in America, it was institutionalized in the context of the circuit rider and revivalism. This had profound results on the form of the teaching. As early as 1784 Francis Asbury advocated preaching the experience of entire sanctification as one which believers should expect immediately by faith. Revivalism emphasized definable turning points in a Christian’s life as essential. Holiness preaching tended to center around Wesley’s sanctification teaching of a second crisis experience subsequent to justification which was commonly termed entire sanctification. From this followed it followed that it was the duty of those who had experienced entire sanctification to confess it and seek to bring others into this experience.As Methodism became respectable, there was a call for a return to the pure doctrine of Wesley. In the latter part of the nineteenth century the National holiness Association was born to promote Wesleyan-holiness theology. Three names are prominent in the promulgation of holiness theology: Phobe Palmer; William Boardman; and Hannah Whitehall Smith.Phobe Palmer’s emphasis becomes key here. Although she says nothing that Wesley did not say a century before, she changes the Wesleyan emphasis subtly, and injects presuppositions foreign to Wesley. Whereas with Wesley the experience of perfection was something to be sought, for Palmer it was vital for continuance of salvation. For Palmer the crisis was vital. Perfection was the beginning of the Christian life and growth in holiness and the focal point of the Christian life. The focus of sanctification tended to be wholly upon a single point of wholehearted commitment, and divorced from any gradual process. “Thus, the moment of death to self and birth to love readily became an end in itself--a goal rather than an essential element in the establishment of a new relationship of freedom and love in the hearts of believers as the Holy Spirit led them from grace to grace in the will of God. (Dieter, 41)C. Key PropositionsSecond Work Of Grace.For the holiness proponents particularly the second work of grace became vital for retaining one’s salvation. Palmer particularly sees justification as dependent upon the believer’s faithfulness. she states:“As I ascended the heavenly way, clearer light shone upon my mind, revealing higher duties, requiring more of the spirit of sacrifice, and furnishing yet stronger tests of obedience. but with increasing light, increasing strength was given, enabling me to be answerable to these higher duties: for I had not learned how to retain justification while under condemnation at the same time for neglecting known duties.”For Palmer the solution lay in sanctification, envisioned as a post conversion crisis. She termed this a crisis because for her the issue was the retention or loss of justification. again she states:“I saw I could not; I must either make the necessary sacrifices, or I must sin, and by my sin forfeit my state of justification. And here my justification would have ended with me had I refused to be holy.”Thus, the second work of grace is really the basis of one’s continuance in salvation.The means of achieving this second work of grace is conceived of as an act of faith akin to the act of faith involved in justification. William Boardman notes:“Whether the question relates to justification or sanctification, the answer is the same. The way of freedom from sin is the same as the way of freedom from condemnation. . . faith in the purifying presence of Jesus.” (Higher Christian Life, 81)This same mentality persists to this day. in the Spring of 1986 I attended a Sanctification Conference sponsored by the C&MA in Piedmont CA. The keynote speaker, the president of the denomination began his first sermon with the words, “There are two gospels, the gospel of justification is for the sinner, the gospel of sanctification for the saint.” Justification is seen as delivering from the penalty of sin, sanctification is seen to deliver from the power of sin.For Boardman, this work of grace is a mystical inauguration into a process:“In the one, atonement has been made, and the moment it is accepted, pardon is complete; in the other, although the righteousness of Christ is perfect in which the soul is to be clothed, yet the work of unfolding . . . is a work of time and progress.” (40)Hannah Whitehall Smith propounds the basic teaching of holiness theology by bifurcating justification and sanctification. Her contribution, no doubt reflecting her Quaker background was the injection of a quietism into the process. She envisions the process as an entire surrender to the Lord, and a perfect trust in Him. She envisions three steps to the process:(1) The Christian must realize the gift of God.“In order therefore to enter into a practical experience of this interior life, the soul must be in a receptive attitude, fully recognizing that it is God’s gift in Christ Jesus.” (The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life, 47)(2) Consecration is necessary.She states that the soul must be abandoned to God and lie passive in His hands (47) “To some minds the word ‘abandonment might express this idea better than the word consecration. But whatever word we use, we mean an entire surrender of the whole being to God--spirit soul and body placed under his absolute control, for Him to do with us as He pleases.”(3) Faith then follows surrender.“Love may be lavished upon us by another without stint or measure, but until we believe we are that we are loved, it never really becomes ours.” (51) She concludes: “In order to enter into this blessed interior life of rest and triumph, you have to take two steps--first entire abandonment; and second absolute faith. (52-54)While, holiness theologies come in many varieties and with various emphases, they all make the crucial disjuncture between justification, appropriated by faith and securing pardon form sin and sanctification/crisis/second work of grace/baptism by the spirit as a post conversion faith experience which breaks the power of sin.Sinlessness:In Wesley’s mind sin was primarily voluntary and was thus intimately bound up with the will. In a sermon on 1 John 3:9 speaking of the privilege of sinlessness he defined sin in a wholly voluntary manner.By sin I here understand outward sin, according to the plain common acceptation [sic] of the word; an actual, voluntary, transgression of the law of God; and of any commandment of God, acknowledged to be such, at the time it is transgressed.Elsewhere speaking of the nature of sin he declared:Not only sin, properly so called, (that is, a voluntary transgression of a known law) but sin, improperly so called, (that is an involuntary transgression of a divine law, known or unknown) needs the atoning blood.I believe there is no such perfection in this life as excludes these involuntary transgressions which I apprehend to be naturally consequent on the ignorance and mistakes inseparable from mortality.Therefore sinless perfection is a phrase I never use, lest I should seem to contradict myself.I believe a person filled with the love of God is still liable to these involuntary transgressions.Such transgressions you may call sin, if you please: I do not, for the reasons above-mentioned. (Works: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 19 (XI, 396)Wesley’s hamartiology “emphasized the willful or spiritual dimensions of sin more than the outward (moral) or cognitive (theoretical knowledge) aspects of it. Sinlessness in this context was more a matter of willing God’s will than replicating God’s perfect knowledge, action, or holiness; sin was more a matter of knowledgeable and willful rebellion against God’s will than a failure or lack of conformity to the glory of God.” (John Tyson, Charles Wesley on Sanctification (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1986) 257.)Christian Perfection:John Wesley saw Christian perfection which was available to all believers in this life as a gift from God and to be accomplished in a moment in time Christian Perfection is that love of God and our neighbor, which implies deliverance from all sin. That this is received merely by faith That it is given instantaneously, in one moment. That we are to expect it, not at death, but at any moment; that is, now is the accepted time, now is the day of this salvationJohn Wesley was adamant about the instantaneous nature of this perfection/sanctification. His brother Charles however more and more brought the process to the forefront as the years progressed.Wesley himself drew up a list of ten propositions concerning perfection which teach a progress-crisis-progress as a model for Christian perfection. In these propositions it can clearly be seen that Wesley does not understand the term teleios in the sense of mature (BAG,187) but rather in the sense of his own definition of sinlessness. There is such a thing as perfection: for it is again and again mentioned in Scripture. It is not so early as justification: for justified persons are to “go on to maturity.” (Heb. 6:1) It is not so late as death; for St. Paul speaks of living men that were perfect (Phil. 3:15) It is not absolute. Absolute perfection belongs not to man, nor to angels, but to God alone. It does not make a man infallible: None is infallible, while he remains in the body. It is sinless? It is not worthwhile to contend for a term. It is ‘salvation from sin.’ It is ‘perfect love.’ (I John 4:18) This is the essence of it; its properties, or inseparable fruits, are, rejoicing evermore, praying without ceasing, and in everything giving thanks. (I Thess. 5:16, etc.) It is improvable. It is so far from lying in an indivisible point, from being incapable of increase, that one perfected in love may grow in grace far swifter than he did before. It is amissible, capable of being lost; of which we have numerous instances. But we were not thoroughly convinced of this, till five or six years ago. It is constantly both preceded and followed by a gradual work.” (WORKS: “A Plain Account of Christian Perfection,” 25 (XI, 441-42)).As can be seen from the above quoted propositions, for Wesley perfection was not the equivalent of maturity, but it was to be equated with sinlessness (i.e. voluntary transgression), or love. He explained perfection elsewhere as “perfect love.” “I want you to be all love. This is the perfection I believe and teach.” He was careful not to set perfection too high, recognizing the dangers of “high-strained perfection” which he said led to a thousand nervous disorders. Such high-strained perfection (“so high as no man we have ever heard or read of attained [it]”) would have the unexpected result of driving Christian perfection out of the world.Entire Sanctification:This is “a personal, definitive work of God’s sanctifying grace by which the war within oneself might cease and the heart be fully released from rebellion into wholehearted love for God and others.” (Dieter, 17) This experience has negative and positive benefits. Negatively, it is seen as a cleansing of the heart, which heals the remaining systemic damage from Adam’s transgression. Positively, it, it is a freedom, “a turning of the whole heart toward God in love to seek and to know His will, which becomes the soul’s delight.” (Dieter, 18) Wesley listed the benefits of this sanctification: To love God with all one’s heart and one’s neighbor as oneself; To have the mind that is in Christ; To bear the fruit of the Spirit (in accordance with Gal. 5); The restoration of the image of God in the soul, a recovery of man to the moral image of God, which consists of righteousness and true holiness”; 5.Inward and outward righteousness, “holiness of life issuing from the heart”; God’s sanctifying of the person in spirit, soul and body; The person’s own perfect consecration to God; A continuous presentation through Jesus of the individual’s thoughts, words and actions as a sacrifice to God of praise and thanksgiving; Salvation from all sin. (Wesley, sermon “On Perfection”, Works 6, 413-15.)D. Scriptural SupportWesleyans claim that they approach Scripture holistically and do not rely on proof-texts for their doctrine, and that the holistic teaching of Scripture, its warp and woof, supports their doctrine of Sanctification. Nevertheless there are several passages which form the matrix of their understanding of the nature of sanctification. These include:Deut. 30:6Ezekiel 35:-26, 29Matt. 5:8, 48; 6;10Rom 2:29Rom 12:1-2 Therefore I urge you brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship.Phoebe Palmer a leader in the revival of Wesleyanism in the late 19th century gives a typical holiness exposition of this passage, placing it in the context of the altar of Exodus 29:37. According to Palmer, Christ is the believers altar. Since according to Exodus everything that touched the altar is holy, every Christian who was willing by faith to present himself without reservation as a living sacrifice upon the altar of the finished work of Christ would be entirely sanctified and cleansed from all sin. (Dieter, 39)2 Cor 3:17-18; 7:1Gal 2:20Ephesians 3:14-29; 5:27Phil 3:151 Thess. 5:23Titus 2:11-14;Heb. 6:1; 7:25; 10:14John 8:34-36;John 17:20-23:Commenting on the John 17 passage, Mildred Wynkoop has noted parallels with Ephesians 4:Jesus had in mind a spiritually unified body of believersThat would bring glory to Himself.He died to sanctify them. Al other elements of redemption were included but incidental to this.Sanctification was in word and in truth. This “word” obviously not the Scripture primarily, but was found in living fellowship with the living Word, who is himself Truth.The commission was accompanied by a moral fitness--for the unity of the spirit indicated in both passages is moral clear through.(Wynkoop Theology of Love, 320, cited by Dieter, 32)1 John 1:51 John 7-91 John 2:61 John 3:31 John 3:8-10In commenting on this passage Wesley based his whole thesis upon his definition if sin as voluntary transgression. (see above), James 1:4E. CritiqueRedefinition Of Terminology:The Reformed have for centuries taken Wesley to task for teaching sinless perfection. While this charge is not really accurate, for the reasons shown above, Wesley himself must bear the blame for this charge because of his own redefinition of terms. Packer notes:It was indeed confusing for Wesley to give the name perfection to a state which from many standpoints was one of continued imperfection. It was yet more confusing that he should define sin “properly so called”, subjectively, as “voluntary transgression of a known law,” rather than objectively, as failure, whether conscious or unconscious, voluntary or involuntary, to conform to God’s revealed standards. It was supremely confusing when he let himself speak of sanctified persons as being without sin ( because they were not consciously breaking any known law) while at the same time affirming that they need the blood of Christ every moment to cover their actual shortcomings. Wesley himself insisted that by the objective standard of God’s “perfect law,” every sanctified sinner needs pardon every day; that makes it seem perverse of him also to have insisted on stating his view of the higher Christian life in terms of being perfect and not sinning.Unrealistic Theological Rationale:Wesley at least saw the experience of perfection uprooting and eradicating sinful desire from the heart. His understanding saw this not only as a change in the moral nature but as effecting some kind of a physical change as well. (see Packer 140-141) This thread of Wesley’s teaching has been picked up by such groups as the church of the Nazarene in its teaching of the eradication of the sin nature.Spiritual Elitism:The injection of a second work of grace into the Christian life also leads to a spiritual elitism on the part of those who have attained this “higher life.” There is a subtle tendency to look down patronizingly upon those who have not had this experience. (One of my former students at Simpson recently told me he was going to write an article entitled, “my life as a second class Christian”!)Dangers of Legalism:Particularly in the holiness groups, the Wesleyan concept of perfection as perfect love was exchanged for what Wesley called “high-strained” perfectionism which seeks the absolute perfection of God. To achieve this high standard, sin was redefined in terms of external acts and equated with cultural norms e.g. smoking, drinking, dancing, hair length, makeup, movies. Richard Lovelace speaks eloquently to this problem. . “. .. the conscience cannot accept sanctification unless it is based in a foundation in justification. When this is attempted the resulting insecurity creates a luxuriant overgrowth of religious flesh as believers seek to build a holiness formidable enough to pacify their consciences and quiet their sense of alienation from God. (The Dynamics of Spiritual Life, 104,) “The fully enlightened conscience cannot be pacified by any amount of grace inherent in our lives, since that always falls short of the perfection demanded by God’s law. . . such a conscience is forced to draw back into the relative darkness of self-deception. Either it manufactures a fictitious righteousness in heroic works of ascetic piety, or it redefines sin in shallow terms so that it can lose the consciousness of its presence.” (99)Problems With Exegesis:Wesley’s Scriptural proof of his doctrine (see above) consist of either promises and calls to holiness (with affirmations that God will indeed finally deliver his people from sin) or they are statements of accomplished deliverance which the believer possesses now. “Wesley affirms that the promises find fulfillment in total and absolute terms in this life and appeals to declarations, along with the prayers and commands, to buttress his conclusions.” (Packer, 139). In short he falls victim to a totally realized eschatology rather than seeing the tension of an “already but not yet” with reference to the Christian life.Protestations notwithstanding . . .Wesley in his own life did not rely upon justification for his acceptance before God. He looked to his state of Sanctification and there found that he was less than perfect. This caused him doubt of his salvation.On October 14, 1738 he wrote, “I cannot find in myself the love of God, or of Christ. Hence my deadness and wanderings in public prayer...Again: I find I have not that joy in the Holy Ghost.”On January 4, 1739 he wrote, “My friends affirm I am mad, because I said I was not a Christian a year ago. I affirm I am not a Christian now. Indeed, what I might have been I know not....Though I have constantly used all means of grace for twenty years, I am not a Christian.”On June 27, 1766 he wrote to Charles Wesley, “. . . and yet (this is the mystery) I do not love God. I never did. Therefore I never believed in the Christian sense of the word. Therefore I am only an honest heathen.”Comment by P.T. Forsythe :“It is a fatal mistake to think of holiness as a possession we have distinct from our faith and conferred upon it. That is a Catholic idea, still saturating Protestant Pietism. (see also Dieter, 14.)III. KeswickWith Keswick one finds a different situation than with the Holiness Movement. Whereas Wesleyan holiness theology is traceable directly to Wesley and has clearly identifiable tenets, Keswick is much more amorphous and comes in many varieties from the strict Keswick of a Major Ian Thomas, John Hunter, Alan Redpath and the Torchbearers fellowship to the milder Keswick of Campus Crusade For Christ and Moody Bible Institute and other respected Evangelical educational institutions. Whereas Holiness theology has tended to dominate in Arminian circles, Keswick has tended to dominate American Evangelicalism of a more Calvinistic bent. Indeed Packer asserts that it has become standard in virtually all of Evangelicalism except confessional Reformed and Lutheran.(151)A. Keswick OriginsIdeological roots: Holiness TheologyCharles Finney & Oberlin TheologyPhobe Palmer & Entire DevotionWilliam Boardman & The Higher Christian LifeHannah Whitehall Smith & The Christian Secret of a Happy LifeHistoric Origins:The term Keswick derives its name from a small community in the Lake district of England. In the wake of the Moody-Sankey campaigns there was an increased thirst for personal holiness and spiritual victory in the lives of many English Evangelicals. T. D. Harford-Battersby, vicar of Keswick was such a man. He had attended the Oxford meetings led by Robert Pearsall Smith and William Boardman 1874. (Bible.org) ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 63 pages 
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THE LIVING FLAME, Goodwin, J.W.
14 Goodwin, J.W. THE LIVING FLAME
Nazarene Publishing House 1939 First Edition; First Printing Paperback Good 
Rare paperback edition of this book. Flame is in reference to the Holy Spirit. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Signed in pencil by Elsie G. Martin, Feb. 1952. scarce. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 176 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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The Last Sanctuary  (Author Signed), Holden, Craig
15 Holden, Craig The Last Sanctuary (Author Signed)
Delacorte Press 1996 0385312091 / 9780385312097 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Author signed. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. From the author whose literary debut, The River Sorrow, was hailed by The New York Times as "a haunting, highly original thriller [with] one powerful surprise after another" comes a riveting new novel that could have come from today's headlines--at once a heart-pounding, chillingly realistic thriller and a dark, complex plunge into the human psyche. Rarely has a first novel received the kind of extraordinary critical acclaim garnered by The River Sorrow, Craig Holden's spellbinding tale of an innocent man accused of murder, caught in a nightmare of terror and survival.With The Last Sanctuary, Holden dazzles us once again with a mesmerizing thriller that introduces another good, ordinary man turned fugitive--this time a Gulf War veteran living on the edge of society, falsely accused of murder and plunged into America's dark underworld of armed militias and terrorist cults, running from the cops, federal agents--and from his own tortured soul. The cat and mouse chase across North America's last wilderness--the soaring mountains and glacier-strewn shores of Alaska--is brilliantly cinematic. The complex relationship between the fugitive, Joe Curtis, and his nemesis, a female Native American ATF agent, is superbly rendered and utterly unpredictable. And the novel, at once nerve-shattering and beautifully written, is as topical as Waco and Oklahoma City--and as universal as our own worst nightmares. ; 1.3 x 9.1 x 4.6 Inches; 370 pages; Signed by Author 
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Living at Home in the North Georgia Foothills: Remnants of a traditional way of life, Holtzberg-Call, Maggie
16 Holtzberg-Call, Maggie Living at Home in the North Georgia Foothills: Remnants of a traditional way of life
Georgia White County Historical Society 1989 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Very Good with No dust jacket as issued 
Green glossy cover with photo of author on cover holding dried peppers. The booklet contains many traditional folkways of the mountain people of Georgia. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. ; Photographs, illustrations; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 27 pages 
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Conquistadors in North American history., Horgan, Paul
17 Horgan, Paul Conquistadors in North American history.
New York Farrar, Straus 1963 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
First Edition. Dust now in mylar cover. The word conquistador comes from Spanish and means "he who conquers." The conquistadors were those men who took up arms to conquer, subjugate and convert native populations in the New World. They had to have some money to purchase the tools of their trade, such as weapons, armor, and horses. Many of them were veteran professional soldiers who had fought for Spain in other wars, such as the reconquest of the Moors (1482-1492) or the "Italian Wars" (1494-1559). Fully indexed, map endpapers. Paul Horgan (August 1, 1903 – March 8, 1995) was an American author of fiction and non-fiction, most of which was set in the Southwestern United States. He was the recipient of two Pulitzer Prizes for History. The New York Times Review of Books said of him, in 1989: "With the exception of Wallace Stegner, no living American has so distinguished himself in both fiction and history." (Wikipedia) ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 303 pages 
Price: 14.97 USD
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Biographical History of Indiana Vol 2., Indiana
18 Indiana Biographical History of Indiana Vol 2.
Chicago, Ill The Lewis Publishing Co 1899 First Edition; Various Hardcover Good with no dust jacket 
Brown 1/2 leather boards with decorative endpapers. Very clean contents. Not a reprint. Front and rear boards are loose and edges show heavy wear. Needs restoration or rebinding. Book is complete Volume 2 only. Excellent biographical records of those living in these Indiana Counties with some photos. Too many surnames to list, but here are a few. Mills, Walker, Bork, Wickersham, Rawn, Phillips, weyland, Small, Duvall, Small, Spitler, Noe, Spencer, Huddleston, Hamilton, West, Mcguire, Peak, Yeoman, York, Sayler, Paris, Ward, Walker, Wood, Kessinger, Knebel, and many many others. Each record contains historical information too. Excellent reference work. This is not a reprint but an original work. Rare.; Teppecanoe, White, Jasper, Newton, Benton, Warren and Pulaski Counties, Indiana; Photos 
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Mayan Enigma  The Search for a Lost Civilization., Ivanoff, Pierre,
19 Ivanoff, Pierre, Mayan Enigma The Search for a Lost Civilization.
Delacorte Press 1971 0440055288 / 9780440055280 First American Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Book and dust in very good condition. Translated from the French by Elaine P. Halperin. First American Edition. ""This careful journal records the French archaeologist's ten year inquiry into a twofold puzzle. Why did the classical Mayans build their incredible cities in the most inaccessible and almost unlivable areas in Central America? And why did they completely abandon them to disappear as the western hemisphere's most vital early culture? Ivanoff's search for clues led to the discovery of a lost city in the jungles of Peten and to years of living with a primitive tribe called the Lacandons who most closely resemble, both physically and culturally, the ancient Mayans. Kirkus Review. ; Photographs; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 202 pages 
Price: 12.97 USD
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Simpler Times (Author Signed), Kinkade, Thomas and Buchanan, Anne Christian
20 Kinkade, Thomas and Buchanan, Anne Christian Simpler Times (Author Signed)
Harvest House Publishers 1996 1565074165 / 9781565074163 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Illustrated by Author Signed by Author
Signed by Kinkade on end paper. Book and dust look new. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover.More than 20 full color paintings of nostalgic, heartwarming scenes accompany Thomas' rich, reflective text. In this personal glimpse into the artists life, you'll discover his thoughts on living, including keeping perspective and creating balance.William Thomas Kinkade III (January 19, 1958 – April 6, 2012) was an American painter of popular realistic, pastoral, and idyllic subjects. He is notable for the mass marketing of his work as printed reproductions and other licensed products via the Thomas Kinkade Company. He characterized himself as "Thomas Kinkade, Painter of Light", a phrase he protected through trademark but which was originally attributed to the British master J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851). Kinkade died in his Monte Sereno, California home on April 6, 2012. It was reported following autopsy that he died of "acute intoxication" from alcohol. (Wikipedia) Rare.; 0.7 x 11.2 x 9.1 Inches; 112 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 129.97 USD
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