ABookLegacy    

 Hard to Find and Rare Books

 Americana, Local History, Genealogy, Religion, Military

 Author Signed, First Editions, and others! 

Quick Search

Title
Author
Description
Keyword
Book Number
Advanced Search
 
 
Our secure web pages are hosted by Chrislands Inc, who use a Thawte SSL Certificate to ensure secure transmission of your information.
Fully Trusted SSL Certificate
 
A Book Legacy

Promote Your Page Too
Sign Up Today for Newsletter and Discounts!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse
 
Browse By Category
African American
Alabama
Alaska
Americana
Archaeology
Arizona
Arkansas
Art
Astronomy
Autobiography
Biography
Books On Books
Business- See Scholarly
California
Canada
Children
Colorado
Comics
Connecticut
Cookbook

View Other Categories
 
 
 

Search

Click on Book Title to view full description

 
The Lincoln Reader, Angle, Paul M.
1 Angle, Paul M. The Lincoln Reader
Rutgers University Press 1947 First Edition; Various Hardcover Very Good in Fair dust jacket 
First Edition. Signed by Angle on endpaper. There is a Phi Beta Kappa bookplate from Philadelphia to a John Barringer of Overbrook High School for "excellence in his studies". Dust has chips around edges but is now in mylar archival sleeve. The Lincoln Reader is a biography of Abraham Lincoln written by sixty-five authors. Paul Angle, the noted Lincoln scholar, selected passages from the works on contemporaries, later biographers, and even Lincoln himself, to form a composite portrait of one of the wisest and most beloved American presidents. These passages, interwoven by Angle's running commentary, blend into a single vivid narrative of Lincoln's life, from his boyhood in Indiana to his assassination and funeral. First published in 1947, The Lincoln Reader has long been considered the most definitive, complete, and authentic retelling of the life of Abraham Lincoln. Fully indexed. We provide delivery tracking. ; Photographs; 8.50 X 5.80 X 1.40 inches; 592 pages; Signed by Editor 
Price: 74.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The Holy Bible [Douay Version] Translated from the Latin Vulgate...; the Old Testament, First Published by the English College at Douday, A.D. 1609, and the New Testament, First Published by the English College at Rheims, A.D. 1582, Challoner, Bishop & Gregory Martin
2 Challoner, Bishop & Gregory Martin The Holy Bible [Douay Version] Translated from the Latin Vulgate...; the Old Testament, First Published by the English College at Douday, A.D. 1609, and the New Testament, First Published by the English College at Rheims, A.D. 1582
John Murphy Company 1914 1st Edition Thus; First Impression Leather Bound Very Good with no dust jacket 
Black leather binding. Has small tear at top of spine otherwise fine condition. Contents clean with no markings. "The Douay–Rheims Bible (pronounced /?du?e?/ or /?da?.e? 'ri?mz/[1]) (also known as the Rheims–Douai Bible or Douai Bible, and abbreviated as D–R and DRB) is a translation of the Bible from the Latin Vulgate into English made by members of the English College, Douai, in the service of the Catholic Church.[2] The New Testament portion was published in Reims, France, in 1582, in one volume with extensive commentary and notes. The Old Testament portion was published in two volumes twenty-seven years later in 1609 and 1610 by the University of Douai. The purpose of the version, both the text and notes, was to uphold Catholic tradition in the face of the Protestant Reformation which up till then had dominated Elizabethan religion and academic debate." reviewer. ; Illustrations; 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
Price: 49.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Christian theology, Clarke, Adam
3 Clarke, Adam Christian theology
New York , NY Published by Lane & Scott 1851 1st Thus; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Original 1851 edition not a reprint. With a life of the Author by Samuel Dunn. Leather binding worn hing starting to crack. Foxing to end papers. Contents clean. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 438 pages 
Price: 99.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Anti-Paraclete, Godbey, W.B.
4 Godbey, W.B. Anti-Paraclete
Cincinnati, OH God's Revivalist Press ca 1900 1st Thus; First Impression Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Blue booklet. Rare imprint. This booklet is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. William B. Godbey was one of the most influential evangelists of the Wesleyan-holiness movement in its formative period (1880-1920). Thousands of people experienced conversion or entire sanctification under his ministry, and Godbey gained a reputation for having revivals everywhere he went. A prolific author, he dictated over 230 books and pamphlets and wrote numerous articles for holiness periodicals. He produced a new translation of the New Testament in 1901, and published a seven-volume Commentary on the New Testament (1896-1900). Godbey’s publications, along with his preaching and “Bible lessons” at camp meetings, earned for the evangelist a widespread reputation among “holiness people” as the “Greek scholar” and “Bible commentator.” Relentlessly on the move, Godbey traveled extensively across the continental United States and circled the globe five times. He was widely reputed to be the holiness movement’s expert on “Bible lands” and “Bible manners and customs.” Through his publications and sermons, Godbey joined a limited number of other ministers who introduced premillennialism into the holiness movement. Godbey was also one of the principal agents responsible for keeping the “tongues movement” out of the rest of the holiness movement. Rare. Possibly no publication date in item. Paperback may indicate a booklet, phamplet, tract or book.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 32 pages 
Price: 39.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Air commentary,, Helmore, William
5 Helmore, William Air commentary,
G. Allen & Unwin 1942 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Illustrated by EHK 
Blue cover grey print. Dust has been price clipped and has creases and a tear at tip of spine otherwise in very good condition. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. ; Black and white drawings; 1 x 9 x 6 Inches; 90 pages 
Price: 25.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Addresses on the Gospel of John, Ironside, H. A
6 Ironside, H. A Addresses on the Gospel of John
Loizeaux Bros 1950 First Edition; Fourth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.In 1930, Wheaton College presented Ironside with an honorary Doctorate of Letters degree, and in 1942-06-03 Bob Jones University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.[3].Bob Jones, Jr., wrote that although Ironside was considered a dignified man, when one got to know him, "he had a terrific sense of humor. Nothing was more fun than to have a good meal in a home somewhere when Dr. Ironside was present. After he was full--he could eat a lot, and he ate faster than any man I ever saw, and his plate would be empty before everyone else got served--he would sit back, push his chair back from the table, and begin to tell funny stories and personal experiences."[4]A few months after he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, Helen died on May 1, 1948. Ironside resigned as pastor of Moody Church on May 30 and retired to Winona Lake, Indiana. On October 9, 1949, he married Annie Turner Hightower, of Thomaston, Georgia, who became his constant companion. He suffered from failing vision, and after surgery to restore it, he set out on November 2, 1950, for a preaching tour of New Zealand, once more among Brethren assemblies, but died in Cambridge, New Zealand, on Jan 15, 1951 and was buried there.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 723 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, Ironside, H. A
7 Ironside, H. A Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet
Neptune City, NJ Loizeaux Bros 1968 Second Edition; Twentieth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust in excellent condition and covered in mylar cover.. Has fold out chart. Former owners name in front. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; Lectures on Daniel the Prophet; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 253 pages 
Price: 26.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised), Ironside, H.A.
8 Ironside, H.A. Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised)
Bible Truth Depot 1954 First Edition; Eighth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Fair dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight and now in mylar cover. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 126 pages 
Price: 17.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
9 Ironside, Henry A. Addresses on the Epistles of John and an Exposition on the Epistle of Jude
Loizeaux Brothers, Incorporated 1948 New Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has minor chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission. 
Price: 26.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Notes on the Book of Genesis, Mackintosh, C. H.
10 Mackintosh, C. H. Notes on the Book of Genesis
New York , NY Loizeaux Brothers, Bible Truth Depot 1930 1st Thus; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Reddish cover with gold print. Excellent condition. Very clean. We provide delivery tracking on US orders. 
Price: 17.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
11 MacKintosh, C. H. The Great Commission
Loizeaux Brothers 1966 Second Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Of all the groups of Christian believers that developed in the English-speaking world in the nineteenth century, the one which produced the greatest number of gifted writers was the Brethren. Of their founder himself, John Nelson Darby, over fifty substantial volumes were published. But of all this notable group of writers, the one whose works have been most frequently printed is C. H. Mackintosh, generally known as C.H.M., which is all that appeared on the title pages of his major writings.C. H. Mackintosh was born in October 1820, at Glenmalure Barricks, County Wicklow, Ireland, the son of the captain of a Highland regiment. Mackintosh was converted at the age of eighteen through the letters of a devout sister, and the prayerful reading of J. N. Darby's Operations of the Spirit. When he was twenty-four years of age, he opened a private school at Westport, but it was not long before he concluded he must give himself entirely to the ministry of the Word of God, in writing and in public speaking. Soon thereafter he felt led to establish a periodical, which he continued to edit for twenty-one years, Things New and Old.Mr. Mackintosh took a great interest in, and actively participated in, the great revival of 1859 and 1860. He died on November 2, 1896, and was buried in Cheltenham Cemetery, awaiting the resurrection morn.Now that more than one hundred years have passed since his death, it is difficult to come upon much factual detail concerning his own personal life. He was a man of a much milder spirit than J N Darby, and breathed an atmosphere of deep devotion, and a love not only for Christian believers but for lost souls. He had a gracious spirit, avoiding conflict as far as possible.Mr. Mackintosh's fame rests primarily upon the work, Notes on the Pentateuch, beginning with a volume of 334 pages on Genesis, and concluding with a two-volume work on Deuteronomy extending to over 800 pages.Another series by Mr. Mackintosh also was frequently reprinted, under the general heading of Miscellaneous Writings, seven volumes, totalling over 2500 pages, and most of it still definitely worth reading.Let me especially call attention to Mr. Mackintosh's excellent comments on Evangelization, which seem to be remarkably up-to-date in this time when we are witnessing so much world-wide evangelization. In volume 4 is a very thorough, illuminating, and sensible discussion of ninety pages on the Great Commission of Luke 24: 44-49. His statements at the very beginning are refreshing to read:"Our divine Master called upon sinners to repent and believe the gospel. Some would have us to believe that it is a mistake to call upon persons dead in trespasses and sins to do anything. "How," it is argued, "can those who are dead repent? They are incapable of any spiritual movement. They must first get the power ere they can either repent or believe."What is our reply to all this? A very simple one indeed--our Lord knows better than all the theologians in the world what ought to be preached. He knows all about man's condition--his guilt, his misery, his spiritual death, his utter helplessness, his total inability to think a single right thought, to utter a single right word, to do a single right act; and yet He called upon men to repent. This is quite enough for us. It is no part of our business to seek to reconcile seeming differences. It may seem to us difficult to reconcile man's utter powerlessness with his responsibility; but "God is His own interpreter, and He will make it plain." It is our happy privilege, and our bounder duty, to believe what He says, and do what He tells us. This is true wisdom, and it yields solid peace. ... Our Lord preached repentance, and He commanded His apostles to preach it; and they did so constantly.Because many are teaching otherwise, one rejoices to see the author's emphasis on the need for genuine repentance. In volume 3 there is a section of eighty-six pages with the general heading, "Papers on Evangelism," in the midst of which is a long and excellent commentary of Acts 16: 8-31. A few lines from these rich pages:"We increasingly feel the immense importance of an earnest, fervent gospel testimony everywhere; and we dread exceedingly any falling off therein. We are imperatively called to "do the work of an evangelist," and not to be moved from that work by any arguments or considerations whatsoever ....We observe, with deep concern, some who were once known amongst us as earnest and eminently successful evangelists, now almost wholly abandoning their work and becoming teachers and lecturers.This is most deplorable. We really want evangelists. A true evangelist is almost as great a rarity as a true pastor. Alas! alas! how rare are both! The two are closely connected ....We are perfectly aware of the fact that there is in some quarters a strong tendency to throw cold water upon the work of evangelization. There is a sad lack of sympathy with the preacher of the gospel; and, as a necessary consequence, of active co-operation with him in his work ....We have invariably found that those who think and speak slightingly of the work of the evangelist are persons of very little spirituality; and on the other hand, the most devoted, the most true-hearted, the best taught saints of God, are always sure to take a profound interest in that work ....But I find in the Gospels, and in the Acts of the Apostles, that a quantity of most blessed evangelistic work was done by persons who were not specially gifted at all, but who had an earnest love for souls, and a deep sense of the preciousness of Christ and His salvation."In the midst of these papers, our author discusses what I think is very rare in his writing, his own participation in the great revival in 1859 in Ulster.; Miscellaneous Writings Volume IV 
Price: 16.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
BOSTON ENGLAND AND BOSTON NEW ENGLAND 1630-1930  Reproductions of Rare Prints with a Commentary Historic Notes Presented by the State Street Trust Company in Commemoration of the 300th Anniversary of the Naming of Boston., Massachusetts
12 Massachusetts BOSTON ENGLAND AND BOSTON NEW ENGLAND 1630-1930 Reproductions of Rare Prints with a Commentary Historic Notes Presented by the State Street Trust Company in Commemoration of the 300th Anniversary of the Naming of Boston.
Boston, MA The State Street Trust Company 1930 First Edition; Various Paperback Good with no dust jacket 
We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; B&W Photographs 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Eagles of the Black Cross, Musciano, Walter
13 Musciano, Walter Eagles of the Black Cross
New York Ivan Obolensky, Inc. 1965 0839211449 / 9780839211440 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
First printing stated. Book has neatly written former owners name in front. Dust has chip at top of spine otherwise excellent. A history of WWI German fighter Aces with minor commentary on their future roles in the Luftwaffe.; Photographs; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 301 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
14 Rice, John R. The Son of Man A Verse-by-Verse Commentary on the Gospel According to Luke
Sword of the Lord Publishers 1971 Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 

Price: 9.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
The golden conquistadores; texts edited by Harry M. Rosen., Rosen, Harry
15 Rosen, Harry The golden conquistadores; texts edited by Harry M. Rosen.
Bobbs-Merrill 1960 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
1960 stated first edition. "Journals, letters, and other legal and private documents by Bernal Diaz del Castillo, Bartolome de las Casas, Antonio de Mendoza, and lesser figures of Spain's Golden Age are presented here in a smooth-reading translation by Harry Rosen. Irwin Blacker's commentary introduces each of the seven chapters and suggests relationships among the excerpts and their authors".(Kirkus Review); Illustrations; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 384 pages 
Price: 11.97 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to [email protected]
Copyright©2019. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie