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An Old-Fashioned Girl, Alcott, Louisa May & Frances Brundage
1 Alcott, Louisa May & Frances Brundage An Old-Fashioned Girl
Saalfield Pub Co 1928 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Fair with no dust jacket Illustrated by Frances Brundage 
Green cover with color label of two girls hugging and boy in background. (See Scan) Soiling to cover, pages clean. There are pencil drawing on end papers (quite good of lady). Illustrations throughout. ; Illustrations; 401 pages 
Price: 6.97 USD
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Scouting for boys, Baden-Powell of Gilwell, Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell
2 Baden-Powell of Gilwell, Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell Scouting for boys
England Pearson 1967 First Edition; Third Printing Paperback Very Good with no dust jacket 
Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition. Signed by three scoutmasters from central Florida. The blueprint for the Boy Scout movement, this hugely influential manual is a must for anyone interested in scouting, youth education, and outdoor activities. The celebrated British general not only provides energetic tips on camping, tracking, and woodcraft, but offers proper Victorian-era advice on manners, self-discipline, and, above all, good citizenship. Includes the original illustrations. Rare. ; 182 pages 
Price: 11.97 USD
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Kimo the Whistling Boy  A Story of Hawaii, Bailey, Alice Cooper & Lucille Holling
3 Bailey, Alice Cooper & Lucille Holling Kimo the Whistling Boy A Story of Hawaii
The Wise-Parslow Company 1928 Rainbow Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by Lucille Holling 
full of fabulous full colour 'Art Deco like' illustrations and many other smaller ones by Lucille Holling.; Color Illustrations; 3.94 X 2.76 X 0.01 inches; 95 pages 
Price: 9.97 USD
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Poplar Island  My memories as a boy, Bailey, Peter K
4 Bailey, Peter K Poplar Island My memories as a boy
P.K. Bailey] 1996 096554530X / 9780965545303 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed and signed by author. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 158 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 49.97 USD
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The Official Handbook for Boys, 1916, Boy Scouts of America
5 Boy Scouts of America The Official Handbook for Boys, 1916
New York Boy Scouts of America 1916 Third Edition; First Impression Paperback Poor with No dust jacket as issued 
This is an original copy of the 1916 Boyscout Handbook in very poor condition but complete. Back cover has ad and the standard cover. The pages are all there but several in front are loose with tears and detached from binding. As you can see from the scan the cover is work, broken in places, and tattared. Back is some better but very tattered. some of spine is missing. Book is in a box and could be a rebind/restoration project. Scarce if not rare. ; Illustrations 
Price: 11.97 USD
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The Dream of Troy, Brackman, Arnold C.
6 Brackman, Arnold C. The Dream of Troy
Mason & Lipscomb 1656 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
First edition stated, dust not price clipped. The dream of a small boy came to life later when Heinrich Schliemann discovered the ruins of Troy. This book traces his quest and the controversy around it. Fully indexed. Map endpapers.; 1974-01-01; Illustrations; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 246 pages; The dream of a small boy came to life later when Heinrich Schliemann discovered the ruins of Troy. This book traces his quest and the controversy around it. 
Price: 14.97 USD
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7 Chalonec, Georges The Brave Mousse, Deck Boy Voyages on the Tall Ship Putnick
College Station, TX Virtualbookworm Publishing 2003 1589394046 / 9781589394049 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Autographed copy. Cover is brown with yellowish print and drawing of tall ship on front. Looks almost new. ; 0.77 x 9.38 x 6.06 Inches; 212 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 11.97 USD
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Molly the Drummer Boy A story of the revolution, Comstock, Harriet T.
8 Comstock, Harriet T. Molly the Drummer Boy A story of the revolution
Philadelphia PA Henry Altemus 1900 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by Curtis Wager-Smith 
Original 1900 printing or author's first book not a reprint. Color image of drummer boy on cover. Some wear to edges of cover, otherwise fine condition. Harriet Theresa Comstock (1860–1925) was an American novelist and author of children's books. Harriet Theresa Comstock was born in Nichols, New York, and educated in Plainfield, New Jersey. In 1885, she married Philip Comstock of Brooklyn, New York.; Illustrations; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 67 pages 
Price: 14.97 USD
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The South African Quirt  (Author Signed), Edmonds, Walter D.
9 Edmonds, Walter D. The South African Quirt (Author Signed)
Little Brown & Co (T) 1985 0316211532 / 9780316211536 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Signed by Author
Inscribed and signed by author. Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Beautiful scarce collectors grade copy of this book. First Edition stated. Little, Brown & Co., Boston 1985. Good/Good dust jacket condition. THE SOUTH AFRICAN QUIRT IS A CLASSIC TALE OF A BOY'S RITE OF PASSAGE, DRAMATICALLY HEIGHTENED BY THE TERRIFYING STRUGGLE THE BOY, NATTY DUNSTON, MUST UNDERGO AT THE HANDS OF HIS TYRANNICAL FATHER.... May have dust spotting on top edge from shelf storage over time.; 1 x 8.4 x 5.8 Inches; 186 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 11.97 USD
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10 Eleazer, J. M. A Dutch Fork Farm Boy (Author Signed)
University of South Carolina Press 1968 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket Illustrated by Corrie McCallum Signed by Author
We provide delivery tracking on US orders. ; Brodart Covered; 154 pages; ; Signed by Author 
Price: 34.18 USD
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Good little boy's book, Hale, S. J
11 Hale, S. J Good little boy's book
New York Published by Edwd. Dunigan, 151 Fulton-Street 1843 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Good with no dust jacket Illustrated by Vincent Dill 
Buff color cover with reddish print. There is no publication date only a date written in (1855) from former owner. The eight color engravings are excellent. Each depicts the associated chapters. The Well Behaved Little Boy, Attentive little boy, inattentive little boy, covetous little boy, dilatory little boy, exact little boy, quarrelsome little boy, and Good little boy. The front cover is detached and back weak. Pages show spotting and light foxing due to age. Book now in archival sleeve to protect condition.Sarah Josepha Hale was born on October 24th, 1788 in Newport, New Hampshire to Revolutionary War Captain Gordon Buell and Martha Whittlesay Buell. Well educated in the classics, Sarah continued her private studies after her marriage in 1813 to David Hale, a lawyer and Freemason. Sarah was widowed in 1822 with five children to support, four under the age of seven. After a brief stint with a millinery shop, she published her first book of poems, The Genius of Oblivion, with David Hale's Freemason lodge paying for the publication. Her career was firmly established with her first novel, Northwood, released in 1827. That same year, she began her most remembered literary position - that of editress. Scarce if not rare. ; Color engravings 
Price: 99.97 USD
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Colonel John Pelham  Lee's Boy Artillerist, Hassler, William Woods
12 Hassler, William Woods Colonel John Pelham Lee's Boy Artillerist
Garrett & Massie 1960 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket Illustrated by Sidney E. King 
Dust Jacket now in Mylar Protective Cover. Has former owners name in front otherwise looks new. ; Illustrations; 185 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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The Red Runners A sequel to The Cazanova Treasure (Author Signed), Hawkins, Seckatary
13 Hawkins, Seckatary The Red Runners A sequel to The Cazanova Treasure (Author Signed)
Cincinnati Robert F. Schulkers 1926 Later Printing; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Poor dust jacket Illustrated by Carll B Williams Signed by Author
Published by Author. Inscribed With all good wishes, signed Seckatary Hawkins. Dust has staining and chips, now in mylar dust cover. Book in very good condition with minor edge wear an stored in an archival slipcase. Very Rare inscribed copy. Seckatary Hawkins is the fictional lead character of a series of children's novels authored by Robert F. Schulkers. The eleven novels were first published between 1921 and 1932, although many appeared first in serialized form in The Cincinnati Enquirer and hundreds of other newspapers around the country. The eleven novels are Stoner's Boy, Seckatary Hawkins in Cuba, The Red Runners, The Gray Ghost, Stormie the Dog Stealer, Knights of the Square Table, Ching Toy, The Chinese Coin, The Yellow Y, Herman the Fiddler, and The Ghost of Lake Tapaho.Schulkers further popularized the series through a nationally syndicated NBC radio broadcast from Chicago and an extensive number of Seckatary Hawkins clubs in larger metropolitan areas. The official club name was "The Fair and Square Club". The club slogan was "A quitter never wins and a winner never quits". Except for Seckatary Hawkins in Cuba and The Ghost of Lake Tapaho, the setting was a river bank that was a composite based on Schulker's familiarity with segments of the Ohio River, the Licking River, and the Kentucky River. Seckatary Hawkins, a fat boy with a cowlick, recorded daily minutes of the adventures of a remarkably organized group of boys. The group of ten or so boys (some boys rotated in and out of the club) had their own club house on the river bank, complete with a stove for heat, a telephone, and even an organ for the required singing practice. Their enemies were formidable. Some had rifles, drove cars, and most were guilty of a number of felonious acts.While never the president of the club, Seckatary Hawkins was clearly the smartest member and the leader. He was regularly called upon by the books' few adult characters and many of the youthful ones to solve various mysteries and to keep the river bank safe. Most of their enemies in the end went home to their mothers or ended up in the school for bad boys. A few reformed during death scenes.Seckatary Hawkins has a small cadre of loyal followers still today who have, under the guidance of one of the author's grandsons, re-established a "Fair and Square" club.The author's books have always enjoyed an enthusiastic readership, the most notable Harper Lee, who mentions two of them in her classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Extremely rare. ; Illustrations; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 336 pages; Signed by Author 
Price: 299.97 USD
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Chrisman's Boy Company A history of the Civil War service of Company A, 3rd Battalion, Virginia Mounted Reserves, Heatwole, John L.
14 Heatwole, John L. Chrisman's Boy Company A history of the Civil War service of Company A, 3rd Battalion, Virginia Mounted Reserves
Mountain and Valley Pub 2000 First Edition; First Impression Paperback Near Fine with no dust jacket Signed by Author
Author Signed. Looks new. "Chrisman's Boy Company relates the heroic service of a company of seventeen year-old cavalrymen from the Shenandoah Valley in the last desperate year of the American Civil War." ; Signed by Author 
Price: 49.97 USD
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In the reign of terror  The adventures of a Westminster boy, Henty, G. A
15 Henty, G. A In the reign of terror The adventures of a Westminster boy
New York, NY A.L. Burt N.D. Later Printing; First Impression Hardcover Fair with no dust jacket Illustrated by John Schonberg 
Illust. By John Schonberg Green with red and black. Kneeling man shooting and Naval boat with cannons firing. Shows wear to edges and corners. Some soiling. Text clean. ; Henty series for boys; Illustrations; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 406 pages; 
Price: 7.97 USD
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Addresses on the Gospel of John, Ironside, H. A
16 Ironside, H. A Addresses on the Gospel of John
Loizeaux Bros 1950 First Edition; Fourth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust jacket now in Brodart mylar protective (clear) cover.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.In 1930, Wheaton College presented Ironside with an honorary Doctorate of Letters degree, and in 1942-06-03 Bob Jones University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.[3].Bob Jones, Jr., wrote that although Ironside was considered a dignified man, when one got to know him, "he had a terrific sense of humor. Nothing was more fun than to have a good meal in a home somewhere when Dr. Ironside was present. After he was full--he could eat a lot, and he ate faster than any man I ever saw, and his plate would be empty before everyone else got served--he would sit back, push his chair back from the table, and begin to tell funny stories and personal experiences."[4]A few months after he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, Helen died on May 1, 1948. Ironside resigned as pastor of Moody Church on May 30 and retired to Winona Lake, Indiana. On October 9, 1949, he married Annie Turner Hightower, of Thomaston, Georgia, who became his constant companion. He suffered from failing vision, and after surgery to restore it, he set out on November 2, 1950, for a preaching tour of New Zealand, once more among Brethren assemblies, but died in Cambridge, New Zealand, on Jan 15, 1951 and was buried there.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 723 pages 
Price: 19.97 USD
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Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, Ironside, H. A
17 Ironside, H. A Daniel Lectures on Daniel the Prophet
Neptune City, NJ Loizeaux Bros 1968 Second Edition; Twentieth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust in excellent condition and covered in mylar cover.. Has fold out chart. Former owners name in front. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; Lectures on Daniel the Prophet; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 253 pages 
Price: 26.97 USD
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Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised), Ironside, H.A.
18 Ironside, H.A. Notes on Philippians (New Ed., revised)
Bible Truth Depot 1954 First Edition; Eighth Printing Hardcover Very Good in Fair dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight and now in mylar cover. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission.; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 126 pages 
Price: 17.97 USD
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19 Ironside, Henry A. Addresses on the Epistles of John and an Exposition on the Epistle of Jude
Loizeaux Brothers, Incorporated 1948 New Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good in Good dust jacket 
Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has minor chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Red cover with gold lettering. Dust has chips and tears otherwise clean and tight. Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside (October 14, 1876-January 15, 1951) was a Bible teacher, preacher, pastor, and author in the late 19th- and early 20th centuries.Ironside was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to John and Sophia (Stafford) Ironside, who were both active in the Plymouth Brethren. At birth, Harry was thought to be dead, so the attending nurses focused their attention on Sophia, who was dangerously ill. Only when a pulse was detected in Harry, 40 minutes later, was an attempt made to resuscitate the infant. When Harry was two years old, his father, John, died of typhoid, at the age of 27. From a very early age, Ironside showed a strong interest in evangelical Christianity and was active in the Salvation Army as a teenager before later joining the "Grant" section of the Plymouth Brethren.The family then moved to Los Angeles, California, on December 12, 1886, and finding no Sunday school there for him to attend, Harry started his own at age 11. Gathering old burlap bags, Harry and his childhood friends sewed them together, producing a burlap tent that could accommodate up to 100 people. Unable to find an adult teacher, Ironside himself did the teaching, with attendance averaging 60 children - and a few adults - each week.In 1888, well-known evangelist Dwight L. Moody preached at a campaign in Los Angeles, with meetings held at Hazard's Pavilion,[1][2] (later known as "Temple Pavilion") which could seat up to 4,000. This inspired Ironside, who hoped to also be able to preach to such crowds one day. In 1889, after a visit from evangelist Donald Munro, Ironside became convinced that he was not "born again," and so gave up preaching at his Sunday school, spending the next six months wrestling with this spiritual problem. After an evening of prayer, in February 1890, Ironside, at age 13, accepted Christ. As he is quoted as saying years later, "I rested on the Word of God and confessed Christ as my Savior." Ironside then returned to preaching, winning his first convert. Though he was taunted at school, he was undeterred from his mission to win souls. Later that year, his mother remarried, to William D. Watson. Ironside graduated from the eighth grade, began working as a part-time cobbler, and decided he had enough education (he never attended school again, which he later regretted).During the days, young Ironside worked full-time at a photography studio, and at night he preached at Salvation Army meetings, becoming known as the "boy preacher." At age 16, he left the photography business and became a preacher full-time with the Salvation Army. Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Salvation Army, Ironside was soon preaching over 500 sermons a year around Southern California. At 18, the grueling schedule had taken its toll on his health, and Ironside resigned from the Salvation Army, entering the Beulah Rest Home to recuperate.In 1896, at 20, he moved to San Francisco, becoming associated again with the Plymouth Brethren. While there, he began helping at British evangelist Henry Varley's meetings, and there met pianist Helen Schofield, daughter of a Presbyterian pastor in Oakland, California. The two soon married. In 1898, Ironside's mother died, and less than a year later, Harry and Helen's first son, Edmond Henry was born. The family moved across the bay to Oakland, where Harry resumed a nightly preaching schedule. They resided there until 1929.In 1903, Ironside accepted his first East Coast preaching invitation, but on returning, the family only had enough funds to make it as far as Salt Lake City, Utah, where he spent the next ten days doing street preaching. Just as the last of their money for a hotel ran out, they received an anonymous envelope with $15, enough to return to Oakland. In 1905, a second son, John Schofield Ironside, was born.During this time, Ironside also began his career as a writer, publishing several Bible commentary pamphlets. In 1914, he rented a storefront and established the Western Book and Tract Company, which operated successfully until the depression in the late 1920s. From 1916 to 1929, Ironside preached almost 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners. In 1918, he was associated with evangelist George McPherson; and in 1924, Ironside began preaching under the direction of the Moody Bible Institute. In 1926, he was invited to a full-time faculty position at the Dallas Theological Seminary, which he turned down, although he was frequently a visiting lecturer there from 1925 to 1943. After a series of sermons presented at the The Moody Church, in Chicago, he was invited to a one-year trial as head pastor there in 1929. Almost every Sunday that he preached there, the 4,000 seat church was filled to capacity. While there, he continued traveling to other US cities during the week for preaching engagements. In 1932, he expanded his travels internationally. Ironside preached the 1935 funeral of Billy Sunday, at Moody Church. In 1938, he toured England, Scotland and Ireland, preaching 142 times to crowds of upwards of 2,000. In 1942, he also became president of the missionary organization, Africa Inland Mission. 
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The Brazen Serpent, or Faith in Christ Illustrated, Jones, Joseph H. D. D. (1797-1868)
20 Jones, Joseph H. D. D. (1797-1868) The Brazen Serpent, or Faith in Christ Illustrated
Philadelphia PA Presbyterian Board of Publication 1864 First Edition; First Impression Hardcover Very Good with no dust jacket 
Reddish brown cover has raised pattern and lettering is in gold. This is an extremely rare publication made during the civil war. The first five chapters all have the title "The Brazen Serpent", Chapter 6 is Little Eleanor about a gifted child who died and then Chapter 7 is The Basket Boy. The book is written for children and is mostly about the serpent in the wilderness. There are contemporary stories mixed in to illustrate God's care for faithful.The cover is in fine condition, but pages starting to yellow.Very clean contents. Joseph Huntington Jones, D. D., the brother of Judge Joel Jones, was born in Coventry, Connecticut, on August 24th, 1797. He graduated at Harvard University, in 1817. For a time he was employed as Tutor in Bowdoin College, Maine. He completed his theological studies at the Princeton Theological Semi­nary; was licensed as a probationer, September 19th, 1822, by the Presbytery of Susquehanna, and was, by the same Presbytery, ordained as an evangelist, April 29th, 1824. This book is protected by an archival quality sleeve to maintain present condition. From 1861 to 1868 he was Secretary of the Relief Fund for Disabled Ministers, in which capacity he did a noble work, for which he deserves the lasting gratitude of the Church. He died on December 22d of 1868. Rare.; Engraving; 24mo 5" - 6" tall; 108 pages 
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